dose

noun
\ ˈdōs How to pronounce dose (audio) \

Definition of dose

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : the measured quantity of a therapeutic agent to be taken at one time
b : the quantity of radiation administered or absorbed
2 : a portion of a substance added during a process
3 : an amount of something likened to a prescribed or measured quantity of medicine a daily dose of hard work a dose of scandal
4 : a gonorrheal infection

dose

verb
dosed; dosing

Definition of dose (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to give a dose to especially : to give medicine to
2 : to divide into doses dose a medicine
3 : to treat with an application or agent

Examples of dose in a Sentence

Noun I've been taking the same dose for five years. a large dose of vitamin C The drug is lethal even in small doses. a large dose of sugar a high dose of radiation Her parents hoped a daily dose of hard work would keep her out of trouble. He needs a good dose of reality. Verb Most patients are dosed at 50 milligrams per day.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun This one did take public money, including at least $1 billion from the U.S., and is being sold at cost, around $3-$5 per dose, during this phase of the pandemic, at least. NBC News, "Creating a Covid-19 vaccine is only the first step. Reaching the world is the next.," 24 Nov. 2020 The company has pledged not to profit on the vaccine during the pandemic, and has priced it at about $2.50 per dose. Amina Khan Staff Writer, Los Angeles Times, "Coronavirus Today: Our best hope to stem the spread," 23 Nov. 2020 AstraZeneca could also offer one of the cheapest Covid vaccines, at $4 to $5 per dose, according to the company. Stephanie Baker, Bloomberg.com, "Astra-Oxford Vaccine Works But Doses Could Be in Short Supply," 23 Nov. 2020 Companies either would charge all countries the same price or set tiered prices for low-, middle- and high-income nations; any could bow out if the price exceeded $21 per dose. Nicholas Kulish, New York Times, "Bill Gates, the Virus and the Quest to Vaccinate the World," 23 Nov. 2020 The federal government paid $1,250 per dose for 300,000 doses of the antibody, dubbed bamlanivimab, which experts say could be enough only for one weeks' worth of people becoming infected. Mica Soellner, Washington Examiner, "Hospitals may restrict Lilly's COVID-19 antibody because of limited supply," 17 Nov. 2020 Also, while new vaccines are making the headlines, a nearly century-old vaccine that costs pennies per dose and is already used by hundreds of millions of people world-wide can help reduce severe outcomes from respiratory infections. Salmaan Keshavjee, WSJ, "Two Existing Technologies Could Fight Covid Now," 16 Nov. 2020 However, the countries may be required to share some of the costs of the vaccines and delivery which is up to $1.60 to $2 per dose. Uwagbale Edward-ekpu, Quartz Africa, "The challenges African countries face to get hold of the Covid-19 vaccine," 13 Nov. 2020 Moderna has said that the cost of their vaccine is going to be US$37 per dose. Smitha Nair, Quartz India, "Why it will be challenging to deliver Pfizer’s Covid-19 vaccine in India," 10 Nov. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb In a challenge trial, the first step is to calibrate the virus dose the volunteers will be given. Jeremy Kahn, Fortune, "U.K. drug trial will deliberately expose young people to coronavirus, despite ethical concerns," 21 Oct. 2020 To dose the right amount onto hands, flip open the cap and gently tip the bottle without squeezing it. Lynn Redmile, Good Housekeeping, "Good Housekeeping's 2020 Sustainable Innovation Awards," 20 Oct. 2020 In 2017 and 2018, the only way to dose with CBD was using tinctures and eye droppers, usually mixed with olive oil or some other not-delicious oil. Rachel King, Fortune, "OneRepublic’s Ryan Tedder on launching a hemp-infused sparkling water brand," 24 Aug. 2020 So our unintended research project may support the studies suggesting reducing your viral exposure dose by distancing and mask-wearing could reduce severity of symptoms and hospitalizations. Stephanie Stradley, Houston Chronicle, "Stephanie Stradley’s Texans training camp preview," 14 Aug. 2020 The company is now planning to dose 40 patients in a phase 2 study in the U.S., including one study at HonorHealth in Arizona. Amanda Morris, The Arizona Republic, "Could one of these drugs be the next emergency treatment for COVID-19?," 6 Apr. 2020 CNMs learn how to dose Pitocin, the drug that speeds up contractions; how to read a continuous fetal monitor strip; and how to work with epidurals. Jennifer Block, Longreads, "The Criminalization of the American Midwife," 10 Mar. 2020 Twelve participants received two 10 microgram doses 21 days apart; 12 received two 30 microgram doses 21 days apart; 12 received a single 100 microgram dose on day one; and nine received placebo, according to the study. Jacqueline Howard, CNN, "Coronavirus vaccines: 'Encouraging' early data for some, a trial delay for another and more research ahead," 2 July 2020 The Pittsburgh International Airport, in a partnership with Carnegie Robotics, just rolled out five autonomous wheeled cleaning robots which scrub floors and dose them with ultraviolet (UV) light, a first for a U.S. airport. Susan Seubert, National Geographic, "Backyard camping and other ways to fire up wanderlust at home," 13 May 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'dose.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of dose

Noun

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

1654, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for dose

Noun

Middle English, from Middle French, from Late Latin dosis, from Greek, literally, act of giving, from didonai to give — more at date

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Time Traveler for dose

Time Traveler

The first known use of dose was in the 15th century

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Statistics for dose

Last Updated

29 Nov 2020

Cite this Entry

“Dose.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/dose. Accessed 1 Dec. 2020.

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More Definitions for dose

dose

noun
How to pronounce dose (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of dose

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: the amount of a medicine, drug, or vitamin that is taken at one time
: an amount of a substance
: an amount of something that a person experiences

dose

verb

English Language Learners Definition of dose (Entry 2 of 2)

: to give a dose of medicine to (someone or something)
: to give an amount of a substance to (someone or something)
US : to add something to (something)

dose

noun
\ ˈdōs How to pronounce dose (audio) \

Kids Definition of dose

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a measured amount to be used at one time a dose of medicine

dose

verb
dosed; dosing

Kids Definition of dose (Entry 2 of 2)

: to give medicine to

dose

noun
\ ˈdōs How to pronounce dose (audio) \

Medical Definition of dose

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : the measured quantity of a therapeutic agent to be taken at one time
b : the quantity of radiation administered or absorbed
2 : a gonorrheal infection

dose

verb
dosed; dosing

Medical Definition of dose (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to divide (as a medicine) into doses
2 : to give a dose to especially : to give medicine to
3 : to treat with an application or agent

intransitive verb

: to take medicine he is forever dosing but he gets worse

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Comments on dose

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