cellulose

noun
cel·​lu·​lose | \ ˈsel-yə-ˌlōs How to pronounce cellulose (audio) , -ˌlōz \

Definition of cellulose

: a polysaccharide (C6H10O5)x of glucose units that constitutes the chief part of the cell walls of plants, occurs naturally in such fibrous products as cotton and kapok, and is the raw material of many manufactured goods (such as paper, rayon, and cellophane)

Examples of cellulose in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web Scientists at the University of Tennessee found that plant cellulose could work better than the additives manufacturers currently use to slow the growth of ice crystals. Jennifer Ouellette, Ars Technica, 26 Mar. 2022 The bait would kill cellulose-digesting protozoa in the termite gut, leading to the termite's death. Elizabeth Gamillo, Smithsonian Magazine, 5 May 2022 Made of 70% wood pulp cellulose and 30% cotton, these can be boiled, soaked in bleach, or safely cleaned in the top rack of your dishwasher (up to 200 times, according to the company). Terri Huggins Hart, Woman's Day, 15 Apr. 2022 For a more sustainable solution, switch to sponges made from natural, biodegradable materials such as cellulose or cotton fibers. Lauren Krueger, Better Homes & Gardens, 12 Apr. 2022 Further, the cellulose nanocrystals worked better than commercial stabilizers when the ice cream was exposed to fluctuating temperatures. Jennifer Ouellette, Ars Technica, 26 Mar. 2022 For companies seeking to supply the growing market for paper and for rayon, made from cellulose, these large trees were ideal. Arkansas Online, 2 Jan. 2022 Courtesy of manufacturers Made from a natural cellulose and cotton, Swedish dishcloths are even more absorbent than paper towels and won't rip. Petra Guglielmetti, Health.com, 11 Mar. 2022 For companies seeking to supply the growing market for paper and for rayon, made from cellulose, these large trees were ideal. Arkansas Online, 2 Jan. 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'cellulose.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of cellulose

1848, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for cellulose

French, from cellule living cell, from New Latin cellula

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Time Traveler for cellulose

Time Traveler

The first known use of cellulose was in 1848

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Dictionary Entries Near cellulose

Cellulomonas

cellulose

cellulose acetate

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Statistics for cellulose

Last Updated

27 May 2022

Cite this Entry

“Cellulose.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/cellulose. Accessed 28 May. 2022.

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More Definitions for cellulose

cellulose

noun
cel·​lu·​lose | \ ˈsel-yə-ˌlōs How to pronounce cellulose (audio) \

Kids Definition of cellulose

: a substance that is the chief part of the cell walls of plants and is used in making various products (as paper and rayon)

cellulose

noun
cel·​lu·​lose | \ ˈsel-yə-ˌlōs, -ˌlōz How to pronounce cellulose (audio) \

Medical Definition of cellulose

: a polysaccharide (C6H10O5)x of glucose units that constitutes the chief part of the cell walls of plants, occurs naturally in such fibrous products as cotton and kapok, and is the raw material of many manufactured goods (as paper, rayon, and cellophane)

More from Merriam-Webster on cellulose

Nglish: Translation of cellulose for Spanish Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about cellulose

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