discourse

noun
dis·​course | \ˈdis-ˌkȯrs, dis-ˈ\

Definition of discourse 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1 : verbal interchange of ideas especially : conversation

2a : formal and orderly and usually extended expression of thought on a subject

b : connected speech or writing

c : a linguistic unit (such as a conversation or a story) larger than a sentence

3 : a mode of organizing knowledge, ideas, or experience that is rooted in language and its concrete contexts (such as history or institutions) critical discourse

4 archaic : the capacity of orderly thought or procedure : rationality

5 obsolete : social familiarity

discourse

verb
discoursed; discoursing

Definition of discourse (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to express oneself especially in oral discourse

2 : talk, converse

transitive verb

archaic : to give forth : utter

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Other Words from discourse

Verb

discourser noun

Examples of discourse in a Sentence

Noun

Hans Selye, a Czech physician and biochemist at the University of Montreal, took these ideas further, introducing the term "stress" (borrowed from metallurgy) to describe the way trauma caused overactivity of the adrenal gland, and with it a disruption of bodily equilibrium. In the most extreme case, Selye argued, stress could wear down the body's adaptation mechanisms, resulting in death. His narrative fit well into the cultural discourse of the cold-war era, where, Harrington writes, many saw themselves as "broken by modern life." — Jerome Groopman, New York Times Book Review, 27 Jan. 2008 Such is the exquisite refinement of American political discourse in the early 21st century. — Brad Friedman, Mother Jones, January & February 2006 Literature records itself, shows how its records might be broken, and how the assumptions of a given discourse or culture might thereby be challenged. Shakespeare is, again, the great example. — Richard Poirier, Raritan Reading, 1990 He likes to engage in lively discourse with his visitors. She delivered an entertaining discourse on the current state of the film industry.

Verb

The most energetic ingredients in a Ken Burns documentary are the intervals of commentary, the talking heads of historians, sociologists, and critics coming at us in living color and discoursing volubly. — Richard Alleva, Commonweal, 22 Feb. 2002 Clarke had discoursed knowledgeably on the implications of temperature for apples; it was too cool here for … Winesaps, or Granny Smiths, none of which mature promptly enough to beat autumn's first freeze. — David Guterson, Harper's, October 1999 … Bill Clinton was up in the sky-box suites, giving interviews. So The Baltimore Sun's guy on the job was Carl Cannon and he took notes while Clinton discoursed on the importance of Ripken's streak, the value of hard work, the lessons communicated to our youth in a nation troubled by blah blah blah. — Richard Ben Cramer, Newsweek, 22 Mar. 1999 She could discourse for hours on almost any subject. the guest lecturer discoursed at some length on the long-term results of the war
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Lee uses Blaxploitation motifs playfully but with purpose, honoring an era of discourse and activism while urging for the necessity of a similar film language now. Richard Lawson, HWD, "In Spike Lee’s Invigorating BlacKkKlansman, the Real Joke Is on Us," 14 May 2018 There are no celebrity comparisons, no heated discourse, and no exertion involved, just a handful of stars and sparkles and an adorable picture. Emily Wang, Teen Vogue, "The Sparkle Meme Has Taken Over Twitter," 6 Apr. 2018 Drawing on close readings of their works and other sources, Dean succinctly charts how these women broke into public discourse and how they were viewed and received. Jim Higgins, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "A 'Sharp' take on Joan Didion, Susan Sontag and other opinionated women," 6 Apr. 2018 Dehumanizing discourse matters, but violence does not require it. Aliza Luft, Washington Post, "How dangerous is it when Trump calls some immigrants ‘animals’?," 25 May 2018 On the left, victimhood is a prime source of authority, and discourse revolves around establishing one’s intersectional credentials and detailing stories of mistreatment that reinforce them. Jonathan Chait, Daily Intelligencer, "Democrats Have Great Female Presidential Candidates. They Need to Avoid the Victim Trap.," 22 Apr. 2018 Meanwhile, Sarver, a former senior aide to then-Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison, has cast herself as one of the few candidates willing to engage in cordial discourse across the aisle. Jasper Scherer, San Antonio Express-News, "Field of 18 GOP candidates fighting for runoff in primary for Lamar Smith’s seat," 14 Feb. 2018 Regardless of the project’s myriad benefits, the council majority denied the application without regard for sound reasoning, solid public policy or even basic civil discourse. Jeffrey Harlan, latimes.com, "Costa Mesa City Council majority got it wrong by denying Plant project," 10 July 2018 Twitter's Vice President for Trust and Safety Del Harvey said in an interview this week the company is changing the calculus between promoting public discourse and preserving safety. Craig Timberg And Elizabeth Dwoskin, chicagotribune.com, "Twitter is sweeping out fake accounts like never before, putting user growth at risk," 7 July 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

That book opens with a group of Cambridge youths discoursing prettily on the existence of a cow on a riverbank. Josephine Livingstone, The New Republic, "Alan Hollinghurst’s Long Journey," 30 Mar. 2018 On the way there, Ed discoursed on Hebrew dialects in the Biblical era, which led to a lively discussion of some arcane points of Catholic Church governance. Fred Schwarz, National Review, "Bill Buckley’s Last Supper," 10 Feb. 2018 Similar themes are discernable in US discourses occurring after and in reaction to the first Chinese, Indian, and Pakistani nuclear tests. Terrell Jermaine Starr, The Root, "Why We Should Fear a North Korean Nuclear Attack, Explained," 2 Oct. 2017 Shaffer's play opens with Lettice Douffet, a classically quirky old-lady character, discoursing on the history of a stately British home. Christopher Arnott, courant.com, "Westport's 'Lettice & Lovage' Delightfully Messes With Your Head," 7 June 2017 In his weekly addresses to the nation, Gen. Prayuth has discoursed on subjects ranging from the best way to cook rice to gardening tips. James Hookway, WSJ, "Thai Prime Minister Prayuth Set to Gain Clout in Royal Succession," 17 Oct. 2016 The freedoms to live out your true sexual identity or use a bathroom without being discriminated against are not akin to discourse about the Trans-Pacific Partnership or Super PACs. Sarah Rense, Esquire, "Sam Bee Is at the Top of Her Game, So of Course a Columnist Tries to Take Her Down," 21 Sep. 2016 Lately, I’ve also written a lot about free speech, academic freedom, and norms around discourse on college campuses. Conor Friedersdorf, The Atlantic, "The Lessons of Bygone Free-Speech Fights," 10 Dec. 2015

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'discourse.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of discourse

Noun

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 4

Verb

1547, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

History and Etymology for discourse

Noun

Middle English discours, from Medieval Latin & Late Latin discursus; Medieval Latin, argument, from Late Latin, conversation, from Latin, act of running about, from discurrere to run about, from dis- + currere to run — more at car

Verb

see discourse entry 1

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Statistics for discourse

Last Updated

9 Nov 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for discourse

The first known use of discourse was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for discourse

discourse

noun

English Language Learners Definition of discourse

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: the use of words to exchange thoughts and ideas

: a long talk or piece of writing about a subject

discourse

verb

English Language Learners Definition of discourse (Entry 2 of 2)

: to talk about something especially for a long time

discourse

noun
dis·​course | \ˈdis-ˌkȯrs \

Kids Definition of discourse

 (Entry 1 of 2)

2 : a long talk or essay about a subject

discourse

verb
dis·​course | \dis-ˈkȯrs \
discoursed; discoursing

Kids Definition of discourse (Entry 2 of 2)

: to talk especially for a long time

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