diamond

noun, often attributive
di·​a·​mond | \ ˈdī-(ə-)mənd How to pronounce diamond (audio) \

Definition of diamond

 (Entry 1 of 4)

1a : native crystalline carbon that is the hardest known mineral, that is usually nearly colorless, that when transparent and free from flaws is highly valued as a precious stone, and that is used industrially especially as an abrasive also : a piece of this substance
b : crystallized carbon produced artificially
2 : something that resembles a diamond (as in brilliance, value, or fine quality)
3 : a square or rhombus-shaped figure usually oriented with the long diagonal vertical
4a : a playing card marked with a stylized figure of a red diamond
b diamonds plural in form but singular or plural in construction : the suit comprising cards marked with diamonds
5 : a baseball infield also : the entire playing field

diamond

verb
diamonded; diamonding; diamonds

Definition of diamond (Entry 2 of 4)

transitive verb

: to adorn with or as if with diamonds

diamond

adjective

Definition of diamond (Entry 3 of 4)

: of, relating to, or being a 60th or 75th anniversary or its celebration diamond jubilee

Diamond

biographical name
Di·​a·​mond | \ ˈdī-(ə-)mənd How to pronounce Diamond (audio) \

Definition of Diamond (Entry 4 of 4)

Peter A(rthur) 1940–     American economist

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Did You Know?

The largest uncut diamond ever found on earth was the 3,106-carat Cullinan diamond. It was mined in South Africa in 1905 and cut to form the 530-carat “Star of Africa,” which is now part of the British Crown Jewels. But that is nothing compared with the biggest in the known universe. In 2004 American astronomers discovered a diamond 2,500 miles (4,000 km) wide, weighing 10 billion trillion trillion carats, at the heart of a white dwarf star eight light years away in the constellation Centaurus. The star is unofficially known as Lucy, after the Beatles song “Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds.”

Examples of diamond in a Sentence

Noun a necklace studded with diamonds and rubies The ruby was surrounded by a ring of diamond. The children cut the fabric into diamonds. one heart, two diamonds, and two clubs He played the queen of diamonds. Adjective the celebration of Queen Victoria's diamond jubilee in 1897
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Also missing: Shanti's diamond engagement ring valued at approximately $15,000. Erin Moriarty, CBS News, "Was a Florida man's obsession with a home renovation a motive for murder?," 12 Sep. 2020 The house escaped the flames, but 39 of the property’s 40 acres burned, including one of the dugouts of a baseball diamond the couple had built for their sons and their friends. Rob Nikolewski, San Diego Union-Tribune, "Homeowners clean up and regroup amid the embers of the Valley fire," 12 Sep. 2020 From delivering financial aid to different Latin American countries to offering free baseball clinics to underprivileged youth, Clemente’s legacy goes far beyond the baseball diamond. Brett Shweky, sun-sentinel.com, "Rojas earns Marlins' nomination for Roberto Clemente Award," 10 Sep. 2020 And it’s a lot easier to divide cash than a diamond ring. Marni Jameson, orlandosentinel.com, "When liquidating home contents, keep legacy in mind," 21 Aug. 2020 The beauty mogul kept her accessories super simple, wearing only small diamond studs, so her signature curves could steal the show. Hanna Flanagan, PEOPLE.com, "The Best Style Moments from Cardi B and Megan Thee Stallion's New 'WAP' Music Video," 7 Aug. 2020 Earlier this month, Scott and his collaborator, a chemist at Bristol named Neil Fox, created a company called Arkenlight to commercialize their nuclear diamond battery. Daniel Oberhaus, Wired, "Are Radioactive Diamond Batteries a Cure for Nuclear Waste?," 31 Aug. 2020 Dubai already has a major gold market and growing diamond trade. Jon Gambrell, Star Tribune, "UAE formally ends Israel boycott amid US-brokered deal," 29 Aug. 2020 Ball has an industrial-grade studio with a fancy behemoth-size robotic diamond wire saw and every factory gadget under the sun. Brian T. Allen, National Review, "Timely Reminder in Dallas: Great Art Is Thrilling to Look At," 29 Aug. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Instead, they were drawn to the idea that diamonds represent authenticity. Andrew E. Kramer, New York Times, "A Diamond Giant Plays Up Its Russian Ties to Appeal to Americans," 11 July 2018 The Del Paso Youth Baseball league has not used the Johnston Park diamonds in two years, according to a staff report. Anita Chabria, sacbee, "Sacramento homeless: Tent city proposed for Johnston Park in north Sacramento | The Sacramento Bee," 24 Apr. 2017 They are accused of burglarizing Tustin Village Jewelers, Diamonds Direct in Laguna Hills, Nick’s Jewelry and Watch Craft in Fullerton and Mimi’s Jewelry and Ballard and Ballard Jewelry in Fountain Valley. Orange County Register, "Man gets 2 years for 5 Orange County jewelry store burglaries," 20 Jan. 2017 Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective Diamond experts say the gem could be the 10th-largest ever discovered and initially pegged its value at $50 million. Alpha Kamara, USA TODAY, "Sierra Leone mystery: What is whopping 709-carat diamond worth?," 4 July 2017 Diamond’s facility in the county is Pump Station #1 in San Diego, where large-scale waterfalls help dilute the wastewater entering the treatment plant. Kristina Davis, sandiegouniontribune.com, "San Marcos company admits illegally dumping wastewater from portable toilets," 3 June 2017

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'diamond.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of diamond

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

1751, in the meaning defined above

Adjective

1872, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for diamond

Noun

Middle English diamaunde, from Middle French diamand, from Late Latin diamant-, diamas, alteration of Latin adamant-, adamas hardest metal, diamond, from Greek

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Time Traveler for diamond

Time Traveler

The first known use of diamond was in the 14th century

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Statistics for diamond

Last Updated

16 Sep 2020

Cite this Entry

“Diamond.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/diamond. Accessed 20 Sep. 2020.

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More Definitions for diamond

diamond

noun
How to pronounce Diamond (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of diamond

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a very hard usually colorless stone that is a form of carbon and is used especially in jewelry
: a shape that is formed by four equal straight lines and that has two opposite angles that are smaller than a right angle and two opposite angles that are larger than a right angle
: a playing card that is marked with a red diamond shape

diamond

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of diamond (Entry 2 of 2)

: of or relating to the 60th or 75th anniversary of an important event (such as a marriage)

diamond

noun
di·​a·​mond | \ ˈdī-ə-mənd How to pronounce diamond (audio) , ˈdī-mənd \

Kids Definition of diamond

1 : a very hard mineral that is a form of carbon, is usually nearly colorless, and is used especially in jewelry
2 : a flat figure ◊ like one of the surfaces of certain cut diamonds

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Comments on diamond

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