adamant

adjective
ad·a·mant | \ ˈa-də-mənt , -ˌmant \

Definition of adamant 

(Entry 1 of 2)

: unshakable or insistent especially in maintaining a position or opinion : unyielding an adamant insistence on doing things his own way was adamant about making the change

adamant

noun
ad·a·mant | \ ˈa-də-mənt , -ˌmant \

Definition of adamant (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a stone (such as a diamond) formerly believed to be of impenetrable hardness

2 : an unbreakable or extremely hard substance "Trust not in your gold and silver, trust not in your high fortresses; for, though the walls were of iron, and the fortresses of adamant, the Most High shall put terror into your hearts and weakness into your councils …" —George Eliot

Keep scrolling for more

Other words from adamant

Adjective

adamantly adverb

Choose the Right Synonym for adamant

Adjective

inflexible, obdurate, adamant mean unwilling to alter a predetermined course or purpose. inflexible implies rigid adherence or even slavish conformity to principle. inflexible in their demands obdurate stresses hardness of heart and insensitivity to appeals for mercy or the influence of divine grace. obdurate in his refusal to grant clemency adamant implies utter immovability in the face of all temptation or entreaty. adamant that the work should continue

The Meaning and History of adamant

A person who is adamant about something has formed an opinion or taken a position that is not going to change because the person is determined to keep that opinion or position. If you're adamant about a decision you've made, no one can convince you that it was a mistake. If you're adamant that something be done (or not be done), you insist that it be (or not be) so.

The adjective dates to the early 1800s but it comes from a much older—and now much less common—noun. An adamant is an imaginary stone of impenetrable hardness. Historically, the word applied to actual stones (and other substances) believed to be impenetrable; in the 17th century the word was used as a synonym of diamond. The noun adamant comes from a Latin word meaning "material of extreme hardness, diamond."

One side note: however adamant the Adams in your life tend to be, the name Adam is not related etymologically to the word adamant. Adam comes from the Hebrew word 'āḏām, meaning "human being."

Examples of adamant in a Sentence

Adjective

I am keen not to share my genetic code with my insurer, I am keen that my doctor should know it and use it, but I am adamant to the point of fanaticism that it is my decision. —Matt Ridley, Genome, 1999 Arrive to find child physically intact but … adamant that he will not remain another minute in Ski Bunny program. Despite their 'professionalism,' staff members eagerly concur. —Christopher Buckley, New Yorker, 10 Mar. 1997 In the years following the First World War, the debts of our wartime allies and others came to be considered a serious burden on international commerce and well-being. Calvin Coolidge was adamant on repayment. —John Kenneth Galbraith, New Yorker, 21 Apr. 1986 We've tried to talk him into coming with us, but he's adamant about staying here. remained adamant about getting the actor's autograph even after he had disappeared backstage
See More

Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective

Fans on Twitter were adamant that Payet's pre-match contact with the coveted silverware was the reason for Marseille's loss ... not a dominant Atletico being the far superior side. CNN, "'Touching the trophy' curse strikes again in Europa League final?," 17 May 2018 There are a host of freshman who will arrive on campus in fall that will boost depth and opportunities but Clark was adamant that the current roster be accountable and focus on improving throughout the offseason. AL.com, "5 key takeaways from UAB spring game," 7 Apr. 2018 Merkel has toughened her migration policy significantly since 2015, but remains adamant that her stance then was correct. Geir Moulson, Fox News, "Germany's Merkel faces race against time in migrant standoff," 28 June 2018 Merkel has toughened her migration policy significantly since 2015, but remains adamant that her stance then was correct. Washington Post, "Germany’s Merkel faces race against time in migrant standoff," 27 June 2018 However, people at the rally were adamant that this was not enough. Emma Austin, The Courier-Journal, "Oxmoor neighbors gather to protest Topgolf Louisville location," 23 May 2018 Some pundits have noted Knox played out of position as a three at Kentucky, but UK coach John Calipari was adamant before the draft that teams were selling Knox short. Jon Hale, The Courier-Journal, "Kentucky's Kevin Knox is dominating in the NBA Las Vegas summer league," 11 July 2018 While the Universal Standard collection has a limited run, J.Crew is adamant that this won't be the end of its initiative. refinery29.com, "It's Happening! J.Crew Is Finally Introducing Plus Sizing," 10 July 2018 Spidey, too, is adamant about separating mentalism from psychic powers. Lindsay Carlton, Fox News, "Spidey, the mentalist and hypnotist, reveals the secrets of his 'magic'," 19 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'adamant.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of adamant

Adjective

1816, in the meaning defined above

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for adamant

Adjective

derivative of adamant entry 2

Noun

Middle English, "diamond, material of extreme hardness, lodestone," borrowed from Anglo-French, borrowed from Latin adamant-, adamās "material of extreme hardness, diamond," borrowed from Greek adamant-, adámas, probably a borrowing from a substratal or Near Eastern source, conformed by folk etymology to a- a- entry 2 and the stem of the verb dámnēmi "(I) tame, subdue, conquer"

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More about adamant

Statistics for adamant

Last Updated

22 Aug 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for adamant

The first known use of adamant was in the 14th century

See more words from the same century

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for adamant

adamant

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of adamant

: not willing to change an opinion or decision : very determined

adamant

adjective
ad·a·mant | \ ˈa-də-mənt \

Kids Definition of adamant

: not giving in I tried to change her mind, but she was adamant.

Keep scrolling for more

Comments on adamant

What made you want to look up adamant? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

alleviating pain or harshness

Get Word of the Day daily email!

Test Your Vocabulary

Musical Words Quiz

  • gramophone
  • Which word describes a musical performance marked by the absence of instrumental accompaniment?
Name That Thing

Test your visual vocabulary with our 10-question challenge!

TAKE THE QUIZ
Word Winder's CrossWinder

Test Your Knowledge - and learn some interesting things along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ

Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!