despondent

adjective
de·​spon·​dent | \ di-ˈspän-dənt How to pronounce despondent (audio) \

Definition of despondent

: feeling or showing extreme discouragement, dejection, or depression despondent about his health

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Other Words from despondent

despondently adverb

Synonyms & Antonyms for despondent

Synonyms

Antonyms

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Choose the Right Synonym for despondent

despondent, despairing, desperate, hopeless mean having lost all or nearly all hope. despondent implies a deep dejection arising from a conviction of the uselessness of further effort. despondent about yet another rejection despairing suggests the slipping away of all hope and often despondency. despairing appeals for the return of the kidnapped child desperate implies despair that prompts reckless action or violence in the face of defeat or frustration. one last desperate attempt to turn the tide of battle hopeless suggests despair and the cessation of effort or resistance and often implies acceptance or resignation. the situation of the trapped miners is hopeless

Examples of despondent in a Sentence

His colleagues did not care for his despondent company, which made him suffer more, which perpetuated their distance … — Noah Charney, The Art Thief, 2007 The Simpsons' plots are a bit more sophisticated than their Saturday morning counterparts and are occasionally tinged with pathos—as when Homer loses his job at the nuclear-power plant and becomes despondent and even suicidal. — Jerry Lazar, TV Guide, 13 Jan. 1990 Writers who spend much time in universities are likely to grow despondent over the future of literature, for there it is treated as a finished thing. — Louis Simpson, New York Times Book Review, 21 Nov. l982 I had never seen them looking so despondent. a group of despondent fans
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Recent Examples on the Web Family members said Jones suffered from mental illness and was despondent over the death of his grandmother, who had been buried that day. Washington Post, "Police keep using force against Black citizens in Rochester. And the demands for change keep growing.," 6 Apr. 2021 Ultimately, the Weeknd’s music—rhythmic, dance-oriented, and often beautiful, but so plainly despondent at heart—felt like the night’s most appropriate mirror of our cultural moment. Amanda Petrusich, The New Yorker, "Super Bowl Music: The Weeknd’s Self-Loathing, Springsteen’s Jeep, and Dolly Parton’s Gig Economy," 8 Feb. 2021 Employees, stuck working from home for months on end can feel despondent and hopeless. Shawn Freeman, Forbes, "How Leaders Can Help Their Team Think About Growth During Tough Times," 12 Mar. 2021 The migrant girl was around 6 years old, dehydrated, fluish and despondent. al, "Jenn Budd, Border Patrol agent turned migrant activist, has deep Alabama roots," 19 Feb. 2021 Julia Gregor, an investigator for a public defender’s office in Seattle with two sons, ages 12 and 10, said the older boy had grown increasingly despondent during the pandemic. Matt Richtel, New York Times, "Children’s Screen Time Has Soared in the Pandemic, Alarming Parents and Researchers," 16 Jan. 2021 His defense had argued that the actress, despondent about her fading career, shot herself through the mouth. Christopher Weber And Linda Deutsch, USA TODAY, "Phil Spector, famed music producer convicted of murder, dies at 81," 17 Jan. 2021 His defense had argued that the actress, despondent about her fading career, shot herself through the mouth. The Salt Lake Tribune, "Phil Spector, famed music producer convicted of murder, dies at 81," 17 Jan. 2021 His defense had argued that the actress, despondent about her fading career, shot herself through the mouth. Christopher Weber And Linda Deutsch, Chron, "Phil Spector, famed music producer and murderer, dies at 81," 17 Jan. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'despondent.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of despondent

circa 1699, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for despondent

Latin despondent-, despondens, present participle of despondēre

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Time Traveler for despondent

Time Traveler

The first known use of despondent was circa 1699

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Statistics for despondent

Last Updated

11 Apr 2021

Cite this Entry

“Despondent.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/despondent. Accessed 18 Apr. 2021.

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More Definitions for despondent

despondent

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of despondent

formal : very sad and without hope

despondent

adjective
de·​spon·​dent | \ di-ˈspän-dənt How to pronounce despondent (audio) \

Kids Definition of despondent

: very sad Left alone, she grew despondent.

Other Words from despondent

despondently adverb

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Comments on despondent

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