desperate

adjective
des·per·ate | \ˈdes-p(ə-)rət, -pərt\

Definition of desperate 

1a : having lost hope a desperate spirit crying for relief

b : giving no ground for hope the outlook was desperate

2a : moved by despair or utter loss of hope victims made desperate by abuse

b : involving or employing extreme measures in an attempt to escape defeat or frustration made a desperate leap for the rope

3 : suffering extreme need or anxiety desperate for money desperate to escape celebrities desperate for attention

4 : involving extreme danger or possible disaster a desperate situation

5 : of extreme intensity … a desperate languor descended heavily upon her, and she slept …— Elinor Wylie

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Other Words from desperate

desperateness noun

Synonyms & Antonyms for desperate

Synonyms

despairing, despondent, forlorn, hopeless

Antonyms

hopeful, optimistic

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Choose the Right Synonym for desperate

despondent, despairing, desperate, hopeless mean having lost all or nearly all hope. despondent implies a deep dejection arising from a conviction of the uselessness of further effort. despondent about yet another rejection despairing suggests the slipping away of all hope and often despondency. despairing appeals for the return of the kidnapped child desperate implies despair that prompts reckless action or violence in the face of defeat or frustration. one last desperate attempt to turn the tide of battle hopeless suggests despair and the cessation of effort or resistance and often implies acceptance or resignation. the situation of the trapped miners is hopeless

Examples of desperate in a Sentence

The collapse of her business had made her desperate. As the supply of food ran out, people became desperate. We could hear their desperate cries for help. a desperate struggle to defeat the enemy He made a desperate bid to save his job. They made one last desperate attempt to fight their way out.
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Recent Examples on the Web

Karius, making his second appearance since his calamitous display against Los Blancos, will have been desperate for a solid, confident performance to try prove himself to his doubters. SI.com, "Liverpool Fans Furious as Loris Karius Makes Another Huge Mistake in Pre-Season Friendly," 11 July 2018 Trump has been in no mood to hear that migration patterns have returned to historic, seasonal norms this spring, a trend occurring in part because the American economy is buzzing and U.S. farms, factories and businesses are desperate for workers. Author: Josh Dawsey, Nick Miroff, Anchorage Daily News, "‘We’re closed!’: Trump directs his anger over immigration at Homeland Security secretary," 25 May 2018 For the first time in quite some the time, the Cougars are desperate for experience at the quarterback position after the graduation of Luke Falk. Matt Murschel, OrlandoSentinel.com, "Ten quarterback transfers to watch this season," 23 May 2018 That would come as a disappointment to county elections officials, who are desperate for the money. Steve Bousquet, miamiherald, "Florida changes course, will seek federal money for cyber-security on election | Miami Herald," 23 May 2018 Visitor numbers were dwindling and the medieval building complex itself was in desperate need of restoration. Jennifer Billock, Smithsonian, "How a Record-Breaking Aerial Tramway Helped Save a Centuries-Old Armenian Monastery," 6 July 2018 In desperate need for a bounce-back season, Isaiah Thomas should be highly motivated to produce this upcoming season. Josh Robbins, OrlandoSentinel.com, "Magic Mailbag: How will Orlando address its needs at point guard?," 1 July 2018 And while the show’s host, Jamie Foxx, brought a welcome level of irreverence to the telecast, the show was in desperate need of those watercooler moments worth talking about the next morning. Gerrick D. Kennedy, latimes.com, "Perspective: Chaos ruled at this weekend's BET fest — but the fans still flocked to celebrity," 26 June 2018 In 2015, the 911 police dispatch area was in desperate need of an upgrade, with water stains on the ceiling and desks and computers so old that replacement parts were no longer available. Claudia Vargas, Philly.com, "What happened to Philly's $40 million 911 surplus?," 26 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'desperate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of desperate

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for desperate

Latin desperatus, past participle of desperare — see despair entry 2

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Statistics for desperate

Last Updated

20 Oct 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for desperate

The first known use of desperate was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for desperate

desperate

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of desperate

: very sad and upset because of having little or no hope : feeling or showing despair

: very bad or difficult to deal with

: done with all of your strength or energy and with little hope of succeeding

desperate

adjective
des·per·ate | \ˈde-spə-rət, -sprət\

Kids Definition of desperate

1 : very sad and worried and with little or no hope People became desperate for food.

2 : showing great worry and loss of hope a desperate call for help

3 : giving little reason to hope : causing despair a desperate situation

4 : reckless because of despair : rash He made a desperate attempt to escape.

5 : very severe The injury is in desperate need of attention.

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Comments on desperate

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a state of commotion or excitement

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