deprive

verb
de·​prive | \ di-ˈprīv How to pronounce deprive (audio) \
deprived; depriving

Definition of deprive

transitive verb

1 : to take something away from deprived him of his professorship— J. M. Phalen the risk of injury when the brain is deprived of oxygen
2 : to withhold something from deprived a citizen of her rights
3 : to remove from office the Archbishop … would be deprived and sent to the Tower— Edith Sitwell
4 obsolete : remove 'tis honor to deprive dishonored life— Shakespeare

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Synonyms for deprive

Synonyms

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Examples of deprive in a Sentence

working those long hours was depriving him of his sleep one of scores of bishops who had been deprived after the anticlericals came to power
Recent Examples on the Web Stone’s experience teaches that the appearance of feminine power in the media can be used as a weapon to deprive real-life women of actual power. Jo Livingstone, The New Republic, "Sharon Stone and the Fantasy of Female Domination," 30 Mar. 2021 Abusers often use violence, intimidation, degradation, and isolation to deprive victims of their rights to physical security, dignity and respect. Patricia Fersch, Forbes, "Domestic Violence: Coercion And Control Equates To A Loss Of Liberty, Sense Of Self, And Dignity For Women," 19 Mar. 2021 Voters unaware of the unusual circumstances might cast enough votes for the ineligible candidates to deprive Luna of the majority required to be elected. Andres Picon, San Antonio Express-News, "Election will set course of San Antonio's Harlandale ISD under TEA oversight," 28 Mar. 2021 Gaetz and Jordan want Congress to probe the process of conservatorships over concerns about their use to deprive Americans of personal freedoms by others through the courts, according to their letter. Kris Van Cleave, CBS News, "Republicans Matt Gaetz and Jim Jordan try to free Britney Spears," 11 Mar. 2021 People who want to turn a peaceful protest into a riot and are intent on breaking the law do not have the right to deprive peaceful protesters of their right to freedom of speech and their right to assemble. David P. Hutchinson, Star Tribune, "During trial, free speech, public safety will both be protected," 6 Mar. 2021 Police officials could still withhold such records in many situations, including if disclosure would interfere with an ongoing investigation, deprive someone of the right to a fair trial or create an unwarranted invasion of privacy. Washington Post, "After decades of secrecy, Maryland might make police disciplinary records public," 5 Mar. 2021 Instead, the guy elected to serve these constituents is hung up on a border wall, supported a race-baiter in Trump, and wants to deprive women of autonomy over their own bodies. Yvonne Abraham, BostonGlobe.com, "Out of step," 3 Mar. 2021 Many world leaders moved to reassure the public that supermarkets would remain well-stocked throughout the pandemic and that panic-buying would only serve to deprive more vulnerable members of the public of essential items. Niall Mccarthy, Forbes, "The Global State Of Food Security [Infographic]," 2 Mar. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'deprive.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of deprive

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 4

History and Etymology for deprive

Middle English depriven, from Anglo-French depriver, from Medieval Latin deprivare, from Latin de- + privare to deprive — more at private entry 1

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Time Traveler for deprive

Time Traveler

The first known use of deprive was in the 14th century

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Statistics for deprive

Last Updated

12 Apr 2021

Cite this Entry

“Deprive.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/deprive. Accessed 17 Apr. 2021.

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More Definitions for deprive

deprive

verb
de·​prive | \ di-ˈprīv How to pronounce deprive (audio) \
deprived; depriving

Kids Definition of deprive

: to take something away from or keep from having something Mr. Sir was no longer depriving him of water.— Louis Sachar, Holes

deprive

transitive verb
de·​prive | \ di-ˈprīv How to pronounce deprive (audio) \
deprived; depriving

Medical Definition of deprive

: to take something away from and especially something that is usually considered essential for mental or physical well-being a child deprived of emotional support tissue deprived of oxygen

deprive

transitive verb
de·​prive
deprived; depriving

Legal Definition of deprive

: to take away or withhold something from no person shall…be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of lawU.S. Constitution amend. V

Other Words from deprive

deprivation \ ˌde-​prə-​ˈvā-​shən, ˌdē-​ˌprī-​ How to pronounce deprive (audio) \ noun

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Comments on deprive

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