demographic

noun
dem·​o·​graph·​ic | \ ˌde-mə-ˈgra-fik How to pronounce demographic (audio) , ˌdē-mə- \

Definition of demographic

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 demographics plural : the statistical characteristics of human populations (such as age or income) used especially to identify markets a change in the state's demographics
2 business : a market or segment of the population identified by demographics trying to reach a younger demographic

demographic

adjective
variants: or less commonly demographical \ ˌde-​mə-​ˈgra-​fi-​kəl How to pronounce demographic (audio) , ˌdē-​mə-​ \

Definition of demographic (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : of or relating to demography or demographics demographic data
2 sociology : relating to the dynamic balance of a population especially with regard to density (see density sense 2c) and capacity for expansion or decline demographic trends a demographic shift

Keep scrolling for more

Other Words from demographic

Adjective

demographically \ ˌde-​mə-​ˈgra-​fi-​k(ə-​)lē How to pronounce demographic (audio) , ˌdē-​mə-​ \ adverb

Did You Know?

Demographic analysis, the statistical description of human populations, is a tool used by government agencies, political parties, and manufacturers of consumer goods. Polls conducted on every topic imaginable, from age to toothpaste preference, give the government and corporations an idea of who the public is and what it needs and wants. The government's census, which is conducted every ten years, is the largest demographic survey of all. Today demographic is also being used as a noun; so, for example, TV advertisers are constantly worrying about how to appeal to "the 18-to-24-year-old demographic".

Examples of demographic in a Sentence

Noun The town's demographics suggest that the restaurant will do well there. The newspaper will be making some changes in order to adapt to the region's shifting demographics. The demographics of the disease are changing, and we are seeing much younger people being affected by it. Adjective The demographic information shows that the population increased but the average income went down.
See More
Recent Examples on the Web: Noun In other words, this demographic wants to connect with your brand, not just buy your products. Elliot Padfield, Forbes, "Five Lessons On Marketing To Gen Z," 15 Apr. 2021 In the adults 18-49 demographic, the margin is much thinner with Colbert drawing about 449,000 while Kimmel and Fallon are pulling in about 346,000. Cynthia Littleton, chicagotribune.com, "‘Late Show With Stephen Colbert’ to go live after Biden’s address to Congress," 15 Apr. 2021 Juggernauts like Fifty Shades nabbed film adaptations, but predominantly, romance readers had to settle for the likes of chaste, low-budget Lacey Chabert Hallmark vehicles aimed squarely at a lily-white demographic. Maureen Lee Lenker, EW.com, "Romancing the Screen: Could a Bridgerton effect give the romance genre a Hollywood ending?," 14 Apr. 2021 While attention has been focused on Trump supporters, there’s also been worry that white evangelicals, a massive demographic that largely overlaps with the counties in the analysis, will slow the nation’s path to herd immunity. Jordan Rubio, San Antonio Express-News, "By the numbers: How vaccine skepticism in Texas' Trump country threatens herd immunity," 12 Apr. 2021 The neighborhood is home to a large number of Asian American and Pacific Islander residents and businesses, a demographic that has been the target of a surge in hate crimes since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. David Hernandez, San Diego Union-Tribune, "San Diego police urge residents, business owners in Kearny Mesa to report anti-Asian hate crimes," 8 Apr. 2021 That’s a highly opinionated demographic; the discussions with them must have been, to say the least, lively. Karen Martin, Arkansas Online, "A definitive guide on where to ride," 4 Apr. 2021 Support for Navalny also taps a youthful demographic that could be a harbinger of longer-term gains for his political movement. Laura King, Los Angeles Times, "How dissident Alexei Navalny’s new standoff with Russia’s Putin could play out," 1 Apr. 2021 This demographic has now helped fuel the multibillion-dollar VOD market, a virtual replica of a Blockbuster Video. Joshua Hunt, Vulture, "The King of the Geezer Teasers," 31 Mar. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective The decline is even steeper among viewers ages 18 to 49, the demographic group desired most by advertisers. Stephen Battaglio Staff Writer, Los Angeles Times, "Awards shows are struggling to draw TV audiences. Should the Oscars be worried?," 13 Apr. 2021 The trend started—or at least picked up steam—with Nice White Parents, a podcast that blamed the demographic group named in its title for the inferior education inflicted on poor Black and brown kids in New York City. Natalie Wexler, Forbes, "Don’t Blame Privileged Parents For Education Inequity," 6 Apr. 2021 At the same time, Asian-Americans and Pacific Islanders—some 19.3 million strong according to the Census Bureau—are America’s fastest-growing demographic group. Sadanand Dhume, WSJ, "It’s Not Bigotry to Tell the Truth About China," 1 Apr. 2021 Every key demographic group supported photo ID, including African Americans, who split 50 percent to 41 percent in favor. John Fund, National Review, "IDs for a Vaccine Shot, but Not for Voting?," 21 Mar. 2021 According to marketing research firm Nielsen, while African Americans made up just 9.4 percent of bourbon buyers, their average spending on bourbon went up more than 37 percent in 2020, the highest increase of any demographic group. Washington Post, "Black-owned distilleries are breaking barriers that once surrounded the Kentucky bourbon industry," 3 Mar. 2021 Black women now serve in the military at a far higher rate than any other demographic group. New York Times, "In a Changing Military, the Army Eases Its Rules for Women’s Hair," 26 Feb. 2021 The differences by region and demographic group are obscured in the top-line numbers and nationwide comparisons. The Covid Tracking Project, The Atlantic, "Every Major COVID-19 Indicator Has Been Falling for Weeks Now," 18 Feb. 2021 In fourth and fifth grades, all students except white, multiracial and special education students not only failed to meet skill levels expected for their demographic group but missed that mark significantly, district officials said. Jill Tucker, San Francisco Chronicle, "S.F. schools see learning gaps widen during pandemic," 31 Jan. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'demographic.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of demographic

Noun

circa 1966, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Adjective

1882, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for demographic

Noun

derivative of demographic entry 2

Adjective

demography + -ic entry 1

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More about demographic

Time Traveler for demographic

Time Traveler

The first known use of demographic was in 1882

See more words from the same year

Statistics for demographic

Last Updated

20 Apr 2021

Cite this Entry

“Demographic.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/demographic. Accessed 21 Apr. 2021.

Style: MLA
MLACheck Mark Icon ChicagoCheck Mark Icon APACheck Mark Icon Merriam-WebsterCheck Mark Icon

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for demographic

demographic

noun

English Language Learners Definition of demographic

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: the qualities (such as age, sex, and income) of a specific group of people
: a group of people that has a particular set of qualities

demographic

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of demographic (Entry 2 of 2)

: of or relating to the study of changes that occur in large groups of people over a period of time : of or relating to demography

demographic

adjective
de·​mo·​graph·​ic | \ ˌdē-mə-ˈgraf-ik How to pronounce demographic (audio) , ˌdem-ə- How to pronounce demographic (audio) \

Medical Definition of demographic

1 : of or relating to demography
2 : relating to the dynamic balance of a population especially with regard to density and capacity for expansion or decline

Other Words from demographic

demographically \ -​i-​k(ə-​)lē How to pronounce demographic (audio) \ adverb

More from Merriam-Webster on demographic

Nglish: Translation of demographic for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of demographic for Arabic Speakers

Comments on demographic

What made you want to look up demographic? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

Test Your Vocabulary

Name that Thing: Flower Edition

How Strong Is Your Vocabulary?

Test your vocabulary with our 10-question quiz!

TAKE THE QUIZ
Typeshift

Anagram puzzles meet word search.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!