demographic

noun
dem·​o·​graph·​ic | \ ˌde-mə-ˈgra-fik How to pronounce demographic (audio) , ˌdē-mə- \

Definition of demographic

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 demographics plural : the statistical characteristics of human populations (such as age or income) used especially to identify markets a change in the state's demographics
2 business : a market or segment of the population identified by demographics trying to reach a younger demographic

demographic

adjective
variants: or less commonly demographical \ ˌde-​mə-​ˈgra-​fi-​kəl How to pronounce demographical (audio) , ˌdē-​mə-​ \

Definition of demographic (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : of or relating to demography or demographics demographic data
2 sociology : relating to the dynamic balance of a population especially with regard to density (see density sense 2c) and capacity for expansion or decline demographic trends a demographic shift

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Other Words from demographic

Adjective

demographically \ ˌde-​mə-​ˈgra-​fi-​k(ə-​)lē How to pronounce demographically (audio) , ˌdē-​mə-​ \ adverb

Did You Know?

Demographic analysis, the statistical description of human populations, is a tool used by government agencies, political parties, and manufacturers of consumer goods. Polls conducted on every topic imaginable, from age to toothpaste preference, give the government and corporations an idea of who the public is and what it needs and wants. The government's census, which is conducted every ten years, is the largest demographic survey of all. Today demographic is also being used as a noun; so, for example, TV advertisers are constantly worrying about how to appeal to "the 18-to-24-year-old demographic".

Examples of demographic in a Sentence

Noun The town's demographics suggest that the restaurant will do well there. The newspaper will be making some changes in order to adapt to the region's shifting demographics. The demographics of the disease are changing, and we are seeing much younger people being affected by it. Adjective The demographic information shows that the population increased but the average income went down.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun An interesting thing is that turnout among union members is much higher than among people of the same demographics who aren’t union members. Isaac Chotiner, The New Yorker, "An A.F.L.-C.I.O. Adviser Considers the Future of American Workers," 15 May 2020 There’s little chance that people outside a very narrow range of demographics have been infected by this group. Dan Goodin, Ars Technica, "Google Play has been spreading advanced Android malware for years," 29 Apr. 2020 The term is borrowed from the study of demographics, where it is used to describe birthrates. Max Fisher, New York Times, "R0, the Messy Metric That May Soon Shape Our Lives, Explained," 23 Apr. 2020 State officials said a fuller picture of racial demographics are coming into perspective as more information is included in COVID-19 reporting. Los Angeles Times, "L.A. County suffers a disproportionate share of coronavirus deaths amid a grim week," 17 Apr. 2020 Individuals of all demographics are currently stocking up on food and household items for their social distancing and self quarantining. Melissa Lee, USA TODAY, "Stores are running low on diapers—here's where you can still get them," 25 Mar. 2020 This illness infects quickly regardless of demographics, belief, wealth or skin color. Nick Paton Walsh, CNN, "Our connected world made coronavirus spread. It may also be what saves us from it," 12 Mar. 2020 One surprising omission from Murray’s account is the critical role of demographics in driving this social revolution — doubly odd since demographic change was a core topic in The Strange Death of Europe. Jeremy Carl, National Review, "Douglas Murray Challenges Us to Oppose Identity Politics and ‘Live in Truth’," 17 Oct. 2019 The demographics of climate politics are shifting, said Ed Maibach, professor and director of the George Mason University’s Center for Climate Change Communications. James Bruggers, The Courier-Journal, "Some Young Republicans embrace a slower, gentler brand of climate activism," 8 May 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective This basic demographic data is in everyone’s health records. Washington Post, "How the coronavirus exposed health disparities in communities of color," 22 May 2020 Twenty-five Arizona nonprofits and pastors are asking the Arizona Department of Health Services for expanded demographic data on COVID-19 testing. Alison Steinbach, azcentral, "25 Arizona nonprofits and clergy ask health department for more COVID-19 demographic data," 11 May 2020 Oregon’s demographic data contrasts with national numbers, which appear to suggest Hispanics and African-Americans are being hit hardest economically by the pandemic. Mike Rogoway | The Oregonian/oregonlive, oregonlive, "Oregon Insight: Coronavirus layoffs hit all ethnic and racial groups," 10 May 2020 Without compete demographic data, policymakers and researchers will not have information necessary to stop the escalating impact of coronavirus, the lawmakers warn. Alison Dirr, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "Gov. Tony Evers announces free testing for all African Americans, Latinos and tribal members in Wisconsin," 7 May 2020 At that time, of the victims whose demographic data was publicly shared by officials, about 42% of those who had died from COVID-19 were black. Stephanie Toone, ajc, "Teacher, 30, dies of COVID-19 after reportedly being denied testing twice," 30 Apr. 2020 An Associated Press analysis, based on data through Thursday, found that of the more than 21,500 victims whose demographic data was known and disclosed by officials, more than 6,350 were black, a rate of nearly 30%. Time, "Beyoncé, Lady Gaga Offer Hope at Star-Studded TV Special Aimed at Combating COVID-19," 19 Apr. 2020 Though Texas is making public demographic data related to coronavirus deaths, it is often delayed. Allie Morris, Dallas News, "Texas elected officials push for emergency response to racial disparities emerging in COVID-19 pandemic," 14 Apr. 2020 Local health departments record lots of demographic data about each Covid-19 case, including patients’ age, gender, and racial and ethnic background. Katie Palmer, Quartz, "Should coronavirus cases be reported by city? Officials across the US disagree," 12 Apr. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'demographic.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of demographic

Noun

circa 1966, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Adjective

1882, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for demographic

Noun

derivative of demographic entry 2

Adjective

demography + -ic entry 1

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Time Traveler for demographic

Time Traveler

The first known use of demographic was in 1882

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Statistics for demographic

Last Updated

31 May 2020

Cite this Entry

“Demographic.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/demographic. Accessed 2 Jun. 2020.

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More Definitions for demographic

demographic

noun
How to pronounce demographic (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of demographic

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: the qualities (such as age, sex, and income) of a specific group of people
: a group of people that has a particular set of qualities

demographic

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of demographic (Entry 2 of 2)

: of or relating to the study of changes that occur in large groups of people over a period of time : of or relating to demography

demographic

adjective
de·​mo·​graph·​ic | \ ˌdē-mə-ˈgraf-ik How to pronounce demographic (audio) , ˌdem-ə- How to pronounce demographic (audio) \

Medical Definition of demographic

1 : of or relating to demography
2 : relating to the dynamic balance of a population especially with regard to density and capacity for expansion or decline

Other Words from demographic

demographically \ -​i-​k(ə-​)lē How to pronounce demographically (audio) \ adverb

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More from Merriam-Webster on demographic

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with demographic

Spanish Central: Translation of demographic

Nglish: Translation of demographic for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of demographic for Arabic Speakers

Comments on demographic

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