deception

noun
de·​cep·​tion | \ di-ˈsep-shən How to pronounce deception (audio) \

Definition of deception

1a : the act of causing someone to accept as true or valid what is false or invalid : the act of deceiving resorting to falsehood and deception used deception to leak the classified information
b : the fact or condition of being deceived the deception of his audience
2 : something that deceives : trick fooled by a scam artist's clever deception

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Other Words from deception

deceptional \ di-​ˈsep-​shə-​nəl How to pronounce deception (audio) \ adjective

Choose the Right Synonym for deception

deception, fraud, double-dealing, subterfuge, trickery mean the acts or practices of one who deliberately deceives. deception may or may not imply blameworthiness, since it may suggest cheating or merely tactical resource. magicians are masters of deception fraud always implies guilt and often criminality in act or practice. indicted for fraud double-dealing suggests treachery or at least action contrary to a professed attitude. a go-between suspected of double-dealing subterfuge suggests the adoption of a stratagem or the telling of a lie in order to escape guilt or to gain an end. obtained the papers by subterfuge trickery implies ingenious acts intended to dupe or cheat. resorted to trickery to gain their ends

Examples of deception in a Sentence

She accuses the company of willful deception in its advertising. His many deceptions did not become known until years after he died.
Recent Examples on the Web On Tuesday afternoon, the company admitted that the whole thing was a tongue-in-cheek deception that had turned into an utter disaster, my CNN Business colleague Peter Valdes-Dapena reports. Julia Horowitz, CNN, "This IPO fail is a warning for the 'everything wins' rally," 31 Mar. 2021 The US Department of Homeland Security’s Transportation Security Administration, for example, still uses nonverbal deception clues to screen airport passengers for questioning. Jessica Seigel, Smithsonian Magazine, "Why You Can’t Spot a Liar Just By Looking," 30 Mar. 2021 Intriguing, maddening deception can shake up our existence and sometimes—sometimes—set us free. Virginia Heffernan, Wired, "Bed Tricks, Cod, and the Hidden History of Catfishing," 30 Mar. 2021 Damages for aggravated deception alone totaled nearly 159 million euros. Star Tribune, "Paris court convicts, fines pharma firm for deadly diet pill," 29 Mar. 2021 Brett Dustin Whittaker, 37, was indicted on a charge of theft by deception involving checks worth $10,000 or more. Ben Tobin, The Courier-Journal, "Matt Bevin called him 'a changed man.' Now pardoned killer is charged with stealing," 24 Mar. 2021 Baylor had an uncanny ability to hang in mid-air indefinitely, inventing shots and improvising deception along his flight path. Greg Beacham, Anchorage Daily News, "Elgin Baylor, Lakers great and aerialist pioneer, dies at 86," 23 Mar. 2021 Baylor had an uncanny ability to hang in midair, inventing shots and improvising deception along his flight path. Greg Beacham, San Francisco Chronicle, "Hall of Famer Elgin Baylor, longtime Lakers forward, dies at 86," 22 Mar. 2021 Baylor had an uncanny ability to hang in mid-air indefinitely, inventing shots and improvising deception along his flight path. Greg Beacham, ajc, "Elgin Baylor, Lakers great and aerialist pioneer, dies at 86," 22 Mar. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'deception.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of deception

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for deception

Middle English decepcioun, from Anglo-French deception, from Late Latin deception-, deceptio, from Latin decipere to deceive

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Time Traveler for deception

Time Traveler

The first known use of deception was in the 15th century

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Statistics for deception

Last Updated

8 Apr 2021

Cite this Entry

“Deception.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/deception. Accessed 18 Apr. 2021.

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More Definitions for deception

deception

noun

English Language Learners Definition of deception

: the act of making someone believe something that is not true : the act of deceiving someone
: an act or statement intended to make people believe something that is not true

deception

noun
de·​cep·​tion | \ di-ˈsep-shən How to pronounce deception (audio) \

Kids Definition of deception

1 : the act of making someone believe something that is not true Magicians are masters of deception.
2 : trick entry 1 sense 1 His clever deception fooled me.

deception

noun
de·​cep·​tion | \ di-ˈsep-shən How to pronounce deception (audio) \

Legal Definition of deception

1 : an act of deceiving
2 : something that deceives : deceit

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Comments on deception

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