deception

noun
de·​cep·​tion | \ di-ˈsep-shən How to pronounce deception (audio) \

Definition of deception

1a : the act of causing someone to accept as true or valid what is false or invalid : the act of deceiving resorting to falsehood and deception used deception to leak the classified information
b : the fact or condition of being deceived the deception of his audience
2 : something that deceives : trick fooled by a scam artist's clever deception

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Other Words from deception

deceptional \ di-​ˈsep-​shə-​nəl How to pronounce deceptional (audio) \ adjective

Choose the Right Synonym for deception

deception, fraud, double-dealing, subterfuge, trickery mean the acts or practices of one who deliberately deceives. deception may or may not imply blameworthiness, since it may suggest cheating or merely tactical resource. magicians are masters of deception fraud always implies guilt and often criminality in act or practice. indicted for fraud double-dealing suggests treachery or at least action contrary to a professed attitude. a go-between suspected of double-dealing subterfuge suggests the adoption of a stratagem or the telling of a lie in order to escape guilt or to gain an end. obtained the papers by subterfuge trickery implies ingenious acts intended to dupe or cheat. resorted to trickery to gain their ends

Examples of deception in a Sentence

She accuses the company of willful deception in its advertising. His many deceptions did not become known until years after he died.

Recent Examples on the Web

And there are costs to that self-deception, including—as the flip-side of American exceptionalism—isolation in sport and otherwise. The Economist, "Baseball and exceptionalism," 8 June 2019 Ellyn Gottlieb, 58, of Havertown, is charged with first-degree neglect of a care-dependent person, first-degree aggravated assault, involuntary manslaughter, theft by unlawful taking and theft by deception. Fox News, "Pennsylvania woman charged in mother's death after victim found covered in feces, ulcers," 5 June 2019 What makes this book so fascinating, however, is just how little this scholar of self-deception seems to know himself. Emily Bobrow, WSJ, "‘Dark Water’ Review: Unfathomable Depths," 28 Dec. 2018 Given Holmes's penchant for deceit, perhaps speaking in a lower octave was just another part of her deception. Caroline Hallemann, Town & Country, "Is Elizabeth Holmes's Deep Voice Just Another Part of Her Scam?," 18 Mar. 2019 Kiley White, 26, of Galloway, was arrested July 12 and charged with deception and harassment for the alleged ruse, Egg Harbor Township police said. Ryan Gaydos, Fox News, "New Jersey woman faked brain cancer to scam couple into giving her a place to stay, cops say," 19 July 2018 Last month, the Justice Department indicted Mr. Winterkorn on fraud charges in connection with the emissions deception. Jack Ewing, New York Times, "Diesel Scandal Deepens as German Authorities Target Audi Chief and Daimler," 11 June 2018 Colleges will still be liable for intentional deception. The Editorial Board, WSJ, "DeVos’s Gainful Deregulation," 17 Aug. 2018 The journalist, 41-year-old Arkady Babchenko, apologized to all for the deception, first and foremost to his wife, Olga. Mansur Mirovalev, latimes.com, "Back from the dead, Russian journalist stuns colleagues by turning up in Ukraine as authorities describe sting," 30 May 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'deception.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of deception

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for deception

Middle English decepcioun, from Anglo-French deception, from Late Latin deception-, deceptio, from Latin decipere to deceive

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Statistics for deception

Last Updated

15 Jun 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for deception

The first known use of deception was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for deception

deception

noun

English Language Learners Definition of deception

: the act of making someone believe something that is not true : the act of deceiving someone
: an act or statement intended to make people believe something that is not true

deception

noun
de·​cep·​tion | \ di-ˈsep-shən How to pronounce deception (audio) \

Kids Definition of deception

1 : the act of making someone believe something that is not true Magicians are masters of deception.
2 : trick entry 1 sense 1 His clever deception fooled me.

deception

noun
de·​cep·​tion | \ di-ˈsep-shən How to pronounce deception (audio) \

Legal Definition of deception

1 : an act of deceiving
2 : something that deceives : deceit

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Comments on deception

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