cord

noun
\ ˈkȯrd How to pronounce cord (audio) \

Definition of cord

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : a long slender flexible material usually consisting of several strands (as of thread or yarn) woven or twisted together
b : the hangman's rope
2 : a moral, spiritual, or emotional bond
3a : an anatomical structure (such as a nerve or tendon) resembling a cord especially : umbilical cord sense 1a
b : a small flexible insulated electrical cable having a plug at one or both ends used to connect a lamp or other appliance with a receptacle
4 : a unit of wood cut for fuel equal to a stack 4 x 4 x 8 feet or 128 cubic feet
5a : a rib like a cord on a textile
b(1) : a fabric made with such ribs or a garment made of such a fabric
(2) cords plural : trousers made of such a fabric

cord

verb
corded; cording; cords

Definition of cord (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to furnish, bind, or connect with a cord
2 : to pile up (wood) in cords

Other Words from cord

Verb

corder noun

Synonyms for cord

Synonyms: Noun

Visit the Thesaurus for More 

Examples of cord in a Sentence

Noun She wore the key on a cord around her neck. They used cords to tie the tent to the trees.
Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Today, with the advances in processing power and battery life of mobile devices, accelerated by cord-cutting and the rise of mobile-first culture, the mobile device is taking center stage in sports and gaming. Jonathan Anastas, Rolling Stone, 10 Nov. 2021 Charter is facing some of the same problems as its competitors, including cord-cutting and the decline of its video business, said Joseph Bonner, a senior securities analyst at investment research firm Argus Research Group. Mark Maurer, WSJ, 19 Oct. 2021 This pendant is a nod to the 70s, with its earthy tone, yellow gold and leather cord. Joseph Deacetis, Forbes, 8 Nov. 2021 The most memorable gifts are ones that strike a meaningful cord, remind us of fond memories, or are truly one-of-a-kind. Samantha Rees, Vogue, 6 Nov. 2021 So why, at a time of great social reckoning, is preppy style striking a pinwale cord? Kareem Rashed, Robb Report, 2 Oct. 2021 Claire Raymond, 23, stopped counting how many surgeries she's had to relieve the pain that her tethered cord syndrome gives her. Colleen Murphy, Health.com, 27 Oct. 2021 As American households continue to the cut the cord, competition in the connected TV space has heated up between Roku, Amazon, Google and Apple. Johan Moreno, Forbes, 26 Oct. 2021 In one of the new studies, the Boston researchers examined maternal blood, cord blood, and the placentas from 38 pregnant Covid patients. Megan Molteni, STAT, 20 Oct. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb That means a minimal number of poles, preferably shock-corded for fast assembly, and tent clips that snap onto the pole system without a wrestling match. The Editors, Field & Stream, 15 Apr. 2020 All the freedom of a free-roaming gas chainsaw with the environmental sensitivity of a corded electric. Popular Science, 15 Apr. 2020 This corded jigsaw from Black+Decker features a five-amp variable speed motor and an adjustable shoe that’s great for making perfect bevel cuts at an angle of up to 45 degrees. Popular Science, 17 Apr. 2020 Above the impressively broad shoulders is a hump resembling that of a Plains bison, but the hair of a musk ox is more like a mountain goat’s, long and corded, with a woolly underlayer to insulate it from the arctic cold. Andrew Mckean, Outdoor Life, 21 Feb. 2020 Pros: The fit was good and the product is well made, with an interior flap under the zipper, corded edging, and finished seams. The Good Housekeeping Institute, Good Housekeeping, 10 Aug. 2010 Rotary tools are available in both corded electric and cordless versions. Joseph Truini, Popular Mechanics, 24 July 2019 Fearn’s office, empty, shows on a screen, forest-tall metal bookshelves bungee-corded together in the background. Sarah Scoles, Scientific American, 29 July 2019 Jabra's Move headphones work wirelessly or corded with the included 3.5mm headphone cable. Wired Staff, WIRED, 15 July 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'cord.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of cord

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for cord

Noun

Middle English cord, corde, borrowed from Anglo-French corde "string, rope," going back to Latin chorda, corda "tripe, string of a musical instrument," borrowed from Greek khordḗ "catgut, string of a musical instrument, sausage," in plural "guts, tripe" — more at yarn entry 1

Verb

Middle English corden "to string a bow," in part derivative of cord, corde cord entry 1, in part borrowed from Anglo-French corder "to tie with a cord"

Learn More About cord

Time Traveler for cord

Time Traveler

The first known use of cord was in the 14th century

See more words from the same century

Dictionary Entries Near cord

Corcovado

cord

cordage

See More Nearby Entries 

Statistics for cord

Last Updated

26 Nov 2021

Cite this Entry

“Cord.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/cord. Accessed 30 Nov. 2021.

Style: MLA
MLACheck Mark Icon ChicagoCheck Mark Icon APACheck Mark Icon Merriam-WebsterCheck Mark Icon

More Definitions for cord

cord

noun

English Language Learners Definition of cord

: a long, thin material that is usually thicker than a string but thinner than a rope
: an electrical wire that is wrapped in a protective covering and used to connect a device to a power source
: a part of the body that is like a string or rope

cord

noun
\ ˈkȯrd How to pronounce cord (audio) \

Kids Definition of cord

1 : a covered electrical wire used to connect an electrical appliance with an outlet
2 : material like a small thin rope that is used mostly for tying things
3 : an amount of firewood equal to a pile of wood eight feet long, four feet high, and four feet wide or 128 cubic feet (about 3.6 cubic meters)
4 : a rib or ridge woven into cloth
5 : a ribbed fabric

cord

noun
\ ˈkȯ(ə)rd How to pronounce cord (audio) \

Medical Definition of cord

1 : a long slender flexible material usually consisting of several strands (as of thread or yarn) woven or twisted together
2 : a slender flexible anatomical structure (as a nerve) — see spermatic cord, spinal cord, umbilical cord, vocal cord sense 1

More from Merriam-Webster on cord

Nglish: Translation of cord for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of cord for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about cord

WORD OF THE DAY

Test Your Vocabulary

Name that Thing: Flower Edition

Name That Thing

Test your visual vocabulary with our 10-question challenge!

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!