consecrate

adjective
con·se·crate | \ˈkän(t)-sə-ˌkrāt \

Definition of consecrate 

(Entry 1 of 2)

: dedicated to a sacred purpose

consecrate

verb
consecrated; consecrating

Definition of consecrate (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to induct (a person) into a permanent office with a religious rite especially : to ordain to the office of bishop

2a : to make or declare sacred especially : to devote irrevocably to the worship of God by a solemn ceremony consecrate a church

b : to effect the liturgical transubstantiation of (eucharistic bread and wine)

c : to devote to a purpose with or as if with deep solemnity or dedication

3 : to make inviolable or venerable principles consecrated by the weight of history

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Other Words from consecrate

Verb

consecrative \ˈkän(t)-sə-ˌkrā-tiv \ adjective
consecrator \ˈkän(t)-sə-ˌkrā-tər \ noun
consecratory \ˈkän(t)-si-krə-ˌtȯr-ē, -ˌkrā-tə-rē \ adjective

Synonyms & Antonyms for consecrate

Synonyms: Adjective

blessed (also blest), consecrated, hallowed, holy, sacred, sacrosanct, sanctified

Synonyms: Verb

bless, hallow, sanctify

Antonyms: Adjective

deconsecrated, desacralized, unconsecrated, unhallowed

Antonyms: Verb

deconsecrate, desanctify

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Choose the Right Synonym for consecrate

Verb

devote, dedicate, consecrate, hallow mean to set apart for a special and often higher end. devote is likely to imply compelling motives and often attachment to an objective. devoted his evenings to study dedicate implies solemn and exclusive devotion to a sacred or serious use or purpose. dedicated her life to medical research consecrate stresses investment with a solemn or sacred quality. consecrate a church to the worship of God hallow, often differing little from dedicate or consecrate, may distinctively imply an attribution of intrinsic sanctity. battlegrounds hallowed by the blood of patriots

Examples of consecrate in a Sentence

Adjective

the consecrate gold tablets which Joseph Smith claimed to have found

Verb

a philanthropist who consecrated his considerable fortune to an array of charitable causes plans to consecrate the altar in the new church with great ceremony
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

That same year, Vekselberg paid a million dollars to transport 17 Russian church bells from Harvard University back to Moscow, where they were later consecrated by the head of the Russian Orthodox Church in a lavish ceremony. Washington Post, "Who is Viktor Vekselberg, the Russian billionaire linked to Michael Cohen?," 9 May 2018 To get inside was to be baptized, consecrated, canonized. New York Times, "Why Early ’80s New York Matters Today," 17 Apr. 2018 The Fourth of July is a holiday consecrated in meat smoke. Emily Dreyfuss, WIRED, "In Defense of the Vegan Hot Dog," 4 July 2018 In Avignon, Pope Clement VI consecrated the Rhône river. Anne Thériault, Longreads, "Queens of Infamy: Joanna of Naples," 3 July 2018 Calvary Cemetery, which was consecrated in 1857, is home to two Civil War Medal of Honor recipients. Meg Jones, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "Historical marker honoring Civil War veterans at Calvary Cemetery to be dedicated on Gettysburg anniversary," 29 June 2018 Appeals to scripture become a way to baptize our bigotries and consecrate our callousness. Jonathan L. Walton, Time, "Why Authoritarians Love to Quote This Bible Passage," 22 June 2018 Wat Pra Keo, home to the Emerald Buddha, is part of the palace complex and was consecrated in 1782, the first year of rule from Bangkok. Antonia Neubauer, Town & Country, "How to Plan a Trip to Asia," 5 Oct. 2016 The Katy Rotary Club dedicated and consecrated the Memorial Tower on Sept. 11, 2015. Staff Report, Houston Chronicle, "Memorial Tower ceremony honors veterans, 9/11 victims," 30 May 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'consecrate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of consecrate

Adjective

14th century, in the meaning defined above

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for consecrate

Adjective

see consecrate entry 2

Verb

Middle English, from Latin consecratus, past participle of consecrare, from com- + sacrare to consecrate — more at sacred

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Phrases Related to consecrate

consecrate oneself

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Time Traveler for consecrate

The first known use of consecrate was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for consecrate

consecrate

verb

English Language Learners Definition of consecrate

: to officially make (something, such as a place or building) holy through a special religious ceremony

: to officially make (someone) a priest, bishop, etc., through a special religious ceremony

consecrate

verb
con·se·crate | \ˈkän-sə-ˌkrāt \
consecrated; consecrating

Kids Definition of consecrate

: to declare to be sacred or holy : set apart for a sacred purpose consecrate a church

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