transubstantiation

noun
tran·​sub·​stan·​ti·​a·​tion | \ ˌtran(t)-səb-ˌstan(t)-shē-ˈā-shən How to pronounce transubstantiation (audio) \

Definition of transubstantiation

1 : the miraculous change by which according to Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox dogma the eucharistic elements at their consecration become the body and blood of Christ while keeping only the appearances of bread and wine
2 : an act or instance of transubstantiating or being transubstantiated

Examples of transubstantiation in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web Her Catholic upbringing also made a deep impression, especially the mystical aspects of religion such as transubstantiation. Jonathon Keats, Forbes, 20 May 2022 Lyrics are rich in Christian allusions to transubstantiation and the resurrection. Joseph Hudak, Rolling Stone, 8 Mar. 2022 Some bishops have expressed concern over Catholics' acceptance of the doctrine, citing a 2019 survey that found most church members don't believe in transubstantiation. Arkansas Online, 18 Nov. 2021 Some bishops have expressed concern over Catholics’ acceptance of the doctrine, citing a 2019 survey that found most church members don’t believe in transubstantiation. Peter Smith, chicagotribune.com, 17 Nov. 2021 The document highlights the centrality of the doctrine of transubstantiation, which says that when a priest celebrates Mass, the bread and wine is transformed into Jesus' actual body and blood. Arkansas Online, 18 Nov. 2021 The document highlights the centrality of the doctrine of transubstantiation, which says that when a priest celebrates Mass, the bread and wine is transformed into Jesus’ actual body and blood. Peter Smith, chicagotribune.com, 17 Nov. 2021 Found in Catholic doctrine, transubstantiation is when the substance of bread is turned into the substance of the body of Christ during the eucharist. Marya E. Gates, Vulture, 10 Aug. 2021 When the Protestant reformers in the 16th century rejected the Catholic teaching that the bread and wine substantively became the body and blood of Jesus, Catholic Church leaders affirmed the teaching, called transubstantiation. New York Times, 26 June 2021 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'transubstantiation.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of transubstantiation

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 2

Learn More About transubstantiation

Time Traveler for transubstantiation

Time Traveler

The first known use of transubstantiation was in the 14th century

See more words from the same century

Dictionary Entries Near transubstantiation

transubstantiate

transubstantiation

transudate

See More Nearby Entries 

Statistics for transubstantiation

Cite this Entry

“Transubstantiation.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/transubstantiation. Accessed 9 Aug. 2022.

Style: MLA
MLACheck Mark Icon ChicagoCheck Mark Icon APACheck Mark Icon Merriam-WebsterCheck Mark Icon

More from Merriam-Webster on transubstantiation

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about transubstantiation

WORD OF THE DAY

Test Your Vocabulary

The Great British Vocabulary Quiz

  • union jack speech bubble
  • Named after Sir Robert Peel, what are British police called?
Name That Thing

Test your visual vocabulary with our 10-question challenge!

TAKE THE QUIZ
Universal Daily Crossword

A daily challenge for crossword fanatics.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!