consecrate

adjective
con·​se·​crate | \ ˈkän(t)-sə-ˌkrāt How to pronounce consecrate (audio) \

Definition of consecrate

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: dedicated to a sacred purpose

consecrate

verb
consecrated; consecrating

Definition of consecrate (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to induct (a person) into a permanent office with a religious rite especially : to ordain to the office of bishop
2a : to make or declare sacred especially : to devote irrevocably to the worship of God by a solemn ceremony consecrate a church
b : to effect the liturgical transubstantiation of (eucharistic bread and wine)
c : to devote to a purpose with or as if with deep solemnity or dedication
3 : to make inviolable or venerable principles consecrated by the weight of history

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Other Words from consecrate

Verb

consecrative \ ˈkän(t)-​sə-​ˌkrā-​tiv How to pronounce consecrative (audio) \ adjective
consecrator \ ˈkän(t)-​sə-​ˌkrā-​tər How to pronounce consecrator (audio) \ noun
consecratory \ ˈkän(t)-​si-​krə-​ˌtȯr-​ē How to pronounce consecratory (audio) , -​ˌkrā-​tə-​rē \ adjective

Choose the Right Synonym for consecrate

Verb

devote, dedicate, consecrate, hallow mean to set apart for a special and often higher end. devote is likely to imply compelling motives and often attachment to an objective. devoted his evenings to study dedicate implies solemn and exclusive devotion to a sacred or serious use or purpose. dedicated her life to medical research consecrate stresses investment with a solemn or sacred quality. consecrate a church to the worship of God hallow, often differing little from dedicate or consecrate, may distinctively imply an attribution of intrinsic sanctity. battlegrounds hallowed by the blood of patriots

Examples of consecrate in a Sentence

Adjective the consecrate gold tablets which Joseph Smith claimed to have found Verb a philanthropist who consecrated his considerable fortune to an array of charitable causes plans to consecrate the altar in the new church with great ceremony
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb The second-most contested proposal concerned ordaining women deacons, a type of ministry in the church that allows for preaching, celebrating weddings and baptisms, but not consecrating the Eucharist. Nicole Winfield, USA TODAY, "Catholic bishops' historic proposal: Allow married men as priests in remote Amazon regions," 26 Oct. 2019 He was named bishop for the western province of Pinar del Río in December 1978 and was consecrated the following month. Andrea Rodriguez And Peter Orsi, Washington Post, "Jaime Lucas Ortega y Alamino, Catholic cardinal in Cuba, dies at 82," 26 July 2019 The ground was consecrated with an all-night Maya ceremony, and the anonymous skeletons were interred above where they’d been found. Natalie Keyssar, National Geographic, "The cold cases of Guatemala’s civil war were impossible to identify—until now," 19 Dec. 2019 Whoever is elected will be ordained and consecrated as bishop coadjutor on June 27. Greg Garrison | Ggarrison@al.com, al, "Three bishop candidates – 2 women – make list for Episcopal Church," 2 Dec. 2019 The second-most contested proposal concerned ordaining women deacons, a type of ministry in the church that allows for preaching, celebrating weddings and baptisms, but not consecrating the Eucharist. Nicole Winfield, Anchorage Daily News, "Pope’s Amazon synod proposes married priests, female leaders," 27 Oct. 2019 An epic consecrating empire’s end, rather than its origins, this book-length poem sings of the absurdities, inanities, and injustices that pervade modern life. Rachel Aviv, The New Yorker, "Briefly Noted," 19 Nov. 2019 But Twitter is a platform consecrated to the eternal pie fight—to the purposes of protest, complaint, and particularly punishment—where nobody is special and nobody is invulnerable. Tom Junod, The Atlantic, "What Would Mister Rogers Do?," 7 Nov. 2019 This led to three years in Mercer School and Suburban Temple, while Christ Church was rebuilt, then consecrated in 1958, with key elements such as the spire, pulpit, lectern, altar railing and many pews salvaged from the fire, Ellis writes. Thomas Jewell, cleveland, "Shaker’s Christ Episcopal Church marks sesquicentennial on All Saints Day, Nov. 1," 29 Oct. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'consecrate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of consecrate

Adjective

14th century, in the meaning defined above

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for consecrate

Verb and Adjective

Middle English, from Latin consecratus, past participle of consecrare, from com- + sacrare to consecrate — more at sacred

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Time Traveler for consecrate

Time Traveler

The first known use of consecrate was in the 14th century

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Statistics for consecrate

Cite this Entry

“Consecrate.” The Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster Inc., https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/consecrate. Accessed 23 January 2020.

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More Definitions for consecrate

consecrate

verb

English Language Learners Definition of consecrate

: to officially make (something, such as a place or building) holy through a special religious ceremony
: to officially make (someone) a priest, bishop, etc., through a special religious ceremony

consecrate

verb
con·​se·​crate | \ ˈkän-sə-ˌkrāt How to pronounce consecrate (audio) \
consecrated; consecrating

Kids Definition of consecrate

: to declare to be sacred or holy : set apart for a sacred purpose consecrate a church

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Comments on consecrate

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