consecrate

adjective
con·​se·​crate | \ ˈkän(t)-sə-ˌkrāt How to pronounce consecrate (audio) \

Definition of consecrate

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: dedicated to a sacred purpose

consecrate

verb
consecrated; consecrating

Definition of consecrate (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to induct (a person) into a permanent office with a religious rite especially : to ordain to the office of bishop
2a : to make or declare sacred especially : to devote irrevocably to the worship of God by a solemn ceremony consecrate a church
b : to effect the liturgical transubstantiation of (eucharistic bread and wine)
c : to devote to a purpose with or as if with deep solemnity or dedication
3 : to make inviolable or venerable principles consecrated by the weight of history

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Other Words from consecrate

Verb

consecrative \ ˈkän(t)-​sə-​ˌkrā-​tiv How to pronounce consecrate (audio) \ adjective
consecrator \ ˈkän(t)-​sə-​ˌkrā-​tər How to pronounce consecrate (audio) \ noun
consecratory \ ˈkän(t)-​si-​krə-​ˌtȯr-​ē How to pronounce consecrate (audio) , -​ˌkrā-​tə-​rē \ adjective

Choose the Right Synonym for consecrate

Verb

devote, dedicate, consecrate, hallow mean to set apart for a special and often higher end. devote is likely to imply compelling motives and often attachment to an objective. devoted his evenings to study dedicate implies solemn and exclusive devotion to a sacred or serious use or purpose. dedicated her life to medical research consecrate stresses investment with a solemn or sacred quality. consecrate a church to the worship of God hallow, often differing little from dedicate or consecrate, may distinctively imply an attribution of intrinsic sanctity. battlegrounds hallowed by the blood of patriots

Examples of consecrate in a Sentence

Adjective the consecrate gold tablets which Joseph Smith claimed to have found Verb a philanthropist who consecrated his considerable fortune to an array of charitable causes plans to consecrate the altar in the new church with great ceremony
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb All this was meant to consecrate the celebration of Passover. Talia Lavin, The New Republic, "QAnon, Blood Libel, and the Satanic Panic," 29 Sep. 2020 Video of artists Devon Ginn, Okara Imani and Danicia Monét performing to consecrate the locations is the app. Domenica Bongiovanni, The Indianapolis Star, "This scavenger hunt will lead you to stories you might not know about Indianapolis," 18 Sep. 2020 The question of whether to consecrate a Hindu temple at this particular 1.1-hectare (2.8-acre) site has been bothering India since its independence from the British empire, reaching a zenith of political animosity in 1992. The Economist, "Ramming it home Narendra Modi cements a victory for Hindu nationalism at Ayodhya," 4 Aug. 2020 Established in 1232 and officially consecrated in 1259, the friary's burial grounds likely included wealthy, high-status laypersons, according to the authors. Jennifer Ouellette, Ars Technica, "Medieval arrows caused injuries similar to gunshot wounds, study finds," 13 May 2020 The bread to be consecrated for the Communion of the faithful should be placed on a corporal at the edge of the altar, not directly in front of the priest celebrant. Madeline Mitchell, Cincinnati.com, "In-person Mass to resume, but this is not going to be 'a return to normal,' Archbishop says," 8 May 2020 One of the Episcopal bishops in New York, Mary D. Glasspool, was the first openly lesbian bishop to be consecrated in the Anglican Communion, of which the Episcopal Church is a part. Liam Stack, New York Times, "Plan for Cathedral Hospital Stalls Amid Concern Over Evangelical Role," 9 Apr. 2020 It was rebuilt after reunification and consecrated in 2005. Melissa Eddy, New York Times, "How Dresden Looked After a World War II Firestorm 75 Years Ago," 25 Jan. 2020 New distilleries have opened, as have bars consecrated to gin. Anthony Lane, The New Yorker, "The Intoxicating History of Gin," 2 Dec. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'consecrate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of consecrate

Adjective

14th century, in the meaning defined above

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for consecrate

Verb and Adjective

Middle English, from Latin consecratus, past participle of consecrare, from com- + sacrare to consecrate — more at sacred

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Time Traveler for consecrate

Time Traveler

The first known use of consecrate was in the 14th century

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Cite this Entry

“Consecrate.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/consecrate. Accessed 21 Jan. 2021.

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More Definitions for consecrate

consecrate

verb

English Language Learners Definition of consecrate

: to officially make (something, such as a place or building) holy through a special religious ceremony
: to officially make (someone) a priest, bishop, etc., through a special religious ceremony

consecrate

verb
con·​se·​crate | \ ˈkän-sə-ˌkrāt How to pronounce consecrate (audio) \
consecrated; consecrating

Kids Definition of consecrate

: to declare to be sacred or holy : set apart for a sacred purpose consecrate a church

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Comments on consecrate

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