conflation

noun

con·​fla·​tion kən-ˈflā-shən How to pronounce conflation (audio)
plural conflations
: the action or result of conflating:
a(1)
: blend, fusion
What needs to be highlighted is the power that the state wields through conflations of people and place, and policies and programs.Thomas Klak
(2)
: confusion
The conflation of lie and lay is an old problem and, admittedly, an understandable one.Cullen Murphy
Clearly the dominant American culture confuses us Mennonites with the Amish, who in fact began as an insurgent faction rebelling from the Mennonites. America's conflation is reasonable, since the Mennonites and the Amish have historically overlapped in many lifestyle choices.Rhoda Janzen
b
: a composite reading or text
But this book is not simply a conflation of old dispatches from one of the world's forgotten trouble spots.William Boyd

Examples of conflation in a Sentence

the word “robustious” is probably a conflation of “robust” and “boisterous”
Recent Examples on the Web Massie said his vote was due to the conflation of anti-Zionism with antisemitism. Julia Johnson, Washington Examiner, 14 Jan. 2024 To have failed to create that perceptual distinction, to have allowed a conflation of Hamas and the Palestinians, would have risked making a justified Israeli war against Hamas an unjustified war against the Palestinians. Bradley Gitz, arkansasonline.com, 13 Nov. 2023 To say that Taylor Swift’s latest look is a fusion of Princess Diana and an archetypal ’90s dad is perhaps an unnecessary conflation of terms. Daniel Rodgers, Vogue, 4 Oct. 2023 The half-Palestinian model took to Instagram this weekend to share an infographic condemning the conflation of support for Palestinians with antisemitism or support for Hamas — and suddenly, the Israeli government has short-term memory loss. Larisha Paul, Rolling Stone, 16 Oct. 2023 On both a personal and a political level, the Naomi conflation went from periodic annoyance to existential dilemma. Chris Vognar, Los Angeles Times, 5 Sep. 2023 The current conflation of the names is unfortunate for the school, given its longstanding history, Nelson says. Stephen Pastis, Fortune, 12 Aug. 2023 On the heels of five years’ worth of #MeToo revelations, Hollywood’s conflation of love with predation no longer seems so exotic. Time, 11 Aug. 2023 But in Japan, the light-hearted conflation of the two blockbusters has stirred anger from those who view it as trivializing the deaths of hundreds of thousands in the cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, where the U.S. dropped atomic bombs in 1945. Cheng Cheng, NBC News, 2 Aug. 2023 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'conflation.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

First Known Use

1625, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of conflation was in 1625

Dictionary Entries Near conflation

Cite this Entry

“Conflation.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/conflation. Accessed 20 Feb. 2024.

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