conducive

adjective
con·​du·​cive | \ kən-ˈdü-siv How to pronounce conducive (audio) , -ˈdyü- \

Definition of conducive

: tending to promote or assist an atmosphere conducive to education

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Other Words from conducive

conduciveness noun

Synonyms for conducive

Synonyms

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Something conducive "leads to" a desirable result. A cozy living room may be conducive to relaxed conversation, just as a boardroom may be conducive to more intense discussions. Particular tax policies are often conducive to savings and investment, whereas others are conducive to consumer spending. Notice that conducive is almost always followed by to.

Examples of conducive in a Sentence

… air-conditioner cooling towers on the roof provided a conducive summertime abode, from which the germs circulated throughout the edifice in a fine infectious mist. — Wayne Biddle, A Field Guide to Germs, 1995 To the extent to which the political realm is more conducive to rational choice, compared with the social realm which is governed by material and economic concerns, it is in politics that the potentiality for freedom lies. — Gertrude Himmelfarb, The New History and the Old, 1987 It was a hard time, and not conducive to obedience and warmth, and fairly soon I was tucked into a kindly concentration camp for budding Christians … — M. F. K. Fisher, Journal of Gastronomy, Summer 1984 The small hat of woven green plastic raffia, the jazzy short-sleeved shirt (fundamentally orange), the pale blue shorts, were not garments conducive to dignity. — A. N. Wilson, Scandal or Priscilla's Kindness, 1983 the claim that the state's long-standing antitax attitude is conducive to entrepreneurship the noisy environment of the dorms was not very conducive to studying
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Recent Examples on the Web If the weather is not conducive to being outdoors, Sulapas recommends finding time to visit an indoor gym for resistance training or cardio. Baylor College Of Medicine, Houston Chronicle, "Three tips to work off holiday eating," 13 Dec. 2019 That’s not an environment conducive with a five-time All- Star seeking at least one final glorious championship run. BostonGlobe.com, "Meanwhile, Love and Thompson are caught in purgatory. LeBron James bailed on the Cavaliers for the Los Angeles Lakers. Kyrie Irving demanded a trade and was sent to the Celtics. All of the other role players are gone or retired.," 11 Dec. 2019 People who are financially secure and who have an education conducive to seeking out and evaluating evidence are less vulnerable to such notions. Scientific American, "Readers Respond to the March 2019 Issue," 1 July 2019 Philosophical and spiritual heirs to the Run Prevention Red Sox of 2010, the Point Prevention Patriots will travel as far as their defense takes them, especially with an offense more conducive to finger-pointing than point production. BostonGlobe.com, "You're using a browser set to private or incognito mode.," 7 Dec. 2019 What really works There are ways to make your screen viewing more comfortable and more conducive to sleep. Phillip Yuhas, Quartz, "Blue light isn’t the main cause of eye fatigue and sleep loss," 8 Nov. 2019 Environmental conditions could become a little more conducive for development when the system moves into the Gulf of Mexico over the weekend. Richard Tribou, orlandosentinel.com, "Tropical Storm Humberto could form from system that has Florida in its sights," 9 Sep. 2019 Others think children have special environments and incentives, not more conducive brains. The Economist, "To master a language, start learning it early," 10 May 2018 The Maryland offense is in the same boat and weather won’t be conducive to cranking out big numbers. Joe Williams, USA TODAY Sportsbook Wire, "Maryland at Michigan State odds, picks and best bets," 29 Nov. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'conducive.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of conducive

1646, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for conducive

see conduce

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Time Traveler for conducive

Time Traveler

The first known use of conducive was in 1646

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Statistics for conducive

Last Updated

22 Jan 2020

Cite this Entry

“Conducive.” The Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster Inc., https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/conducive. Accessed 25 January 2020.

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More Definitions for conducive

conducive

adjective
How to pronounce conducive (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of conducive

formal : making it easy, possible, or likely for something to happen or exist

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Comments on conducive

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