conducive

adjective
con·​du·​cive | \ kən-ˈdü-siv How to pronounce conducive (audio) , -ˈdyü- \

Definition of conducive

: tending to promote or assist an atmosphere conducive to education

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Other Words from conducive

conduciveness noun

Synonyms for conducive

Synonyms

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Did You Know?

Something conducive "leads to" a desirable result. A cozy living room may be conducive to relaxed conversation, just as a boardroom may be conducive to more intense discussions. Particular tax policies are often conducive to savings and investment, whereas others are conducive to consumer spending. Notice that conducive is almost always followed by to.

Examples of conducive in a Sentence

… air-conditioner cooling towers on the roof provided a conducive summertime abode, from which the germs circulated throughout the edifice in a fine infectious mist. — Wayne Biddle, A Field Guide to Germs, 1995 To the extent to which the political realm is more conducive to rational choice, compared with the social realm which is governed by material and economic concerns, it is in politics that the potentiality for freedom lies. — Gertrude Himmelfarb, The New History and the Old, 1987 It was a hard time, and not conducive to obedience and warmth, and fairly soon I was tucked into a kindly concentration camp for budding Christians … — M. F. K. Fisher, Journal of Gastronomy, Summer 1984 The small hat of woven green plastic raffia, the jazzy short-sleeved shirt (fundamentally orange), the pale blue shorts, were not garments conducive to dignity. — A. N. Wilson, Scandal or Priscilla's Kindness, 1983 the claim that the state's long-standing antitax attitude is conducive to entrepreneurship the noisy environment of the dorms was not very conducive to studying
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Recent Examples on the Web The operation of race tracks is not conducive to this all-out effort. Kristina Goetz, The Courier-Journal, "World War II delayed the Kentucky Derby in 1945. Take a look back at how the race endured," 30 Apr. 2020 Radiation from such events is not particularly conducive to the existence of living organisms. Adam Mann, New York Times, "There’s Something Special About the Sun: It’s a Bit Boring," 30 Apr. 2020 Naturally, social distancing isn't conducive to dancing, but with Zoom, a successful freshman/sophomore affair along with competitions took place. James Weber, Cincinnati.com, "Coronavirus in Ohio: St. Xavier High School students assist in making 3D-printed door hooks," 7 Apr. 2020 The conditions onboard a vessel is conducive to the spread of disease, as navies have long suffered through since the Age of Sail. Joe Pappalardo, Popular Mechanics, "The Coronavirus Can’t Stop America’s Nukes," 1 Apr. 2020 Trading Slay and replacing him with Desmond Trufant, a soon-to-be 30-year-old on a two-year deal is not conducive to long-term success. Dave Birkett, Detroit Free Press, "Here's what Detroit Lions roster needs with NFL draft 1 month away," 27 Mar. 2020 This, too, is hardly conducive to social distancing, prompting officials to postpone Notre-Dame’s restoration indefinitely. Brigit Katz, Smithsonian Magazine, "Two Men Arrested After Trying to Steal Stones From Notre-Dame," 25 Mar. 2020 The choppy stock market is also not conducive to a share sale, while Softex needs more time to prepare its financial statements, said the people. Fathiya Dahrul, Bloomberg.com, "CVC-Backed Softex Considers Indonesian IPO Delay on Virus Concern," 13 Mar. 2020 That’s not conducive to the Spurs deciding to soon trade some of their best players. Callie Caplan, Dallas News, "10 possible trade deadline targets for the Mavs: Would veterans like Andre Drummond, Kevin Love make sense?," 14 Jan. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'conducive.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of conducive

1646, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for conducive

see conduce

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Time Traveler for conducive

Time Traveler

The first known use of conducive was in 1646

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Statistics for conducive

Last Updated

27 May 2020

Cite this Entry

“Conducive.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/conducive. Accessed 27 May. 2020.

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More Definitions for conducive

conducive

adjective
How to pronounce conducive (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of conducive

formal : making it easy, possible, or likely for something to happen or exist

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