concomitant

adjective
con·​com·​i·​tant | \ kən-ˈkä-mə-tənt How to pronounce concomitant (audio) , kän- \

Definition of concomitant

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: accompanying especially in a subordinate or incidental way

concomitant

noun
con·​com·​i·​tant | \ kən-ˈkä-mə-tənt How to pronounce concomitant (audio) , kän- \

Definition of concomitant (Entry 2 of 2)

: something that accompanies or is collaterally connected with something else : accompaniment

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Other Words from concomitant

Adjective

concomitantly adverb

Did You Know?

Adjective

Concomitant was introduced into English at a time when many people were criticizing the use of Latinate forms in favor of more "native" words from Old English. As a descendant of Latin concomitari ("to accompany") and ultimately of "comes," the Latin word for companion, "concomitant" may well have been initially derided as an ostentatious inkhorn term. Indeed, two associated words, the verb concomitate, meaning "to accompany," and another adjective, concomitaneous, meaning "of a concomitant nature," didn't survive to accompany "concomitant" into the 18th century.

Examples of concomitant in a Sentence

Adjective … Christopher Walken delivers his customary edge without any of his clichéd, concomitant weirdness. — Stephen Whitty, Entertainment Weekly, 12 Feb. 1999 The Lincoln and Johnson plans for settling the problems of peace and freedom never seriously touched on the concomitant problem of equality. — John Hope Franklin, "The Two Worlds of Race," 1965, in Race and History1989 But it was observed that this pill would be peculiarly bitter to the Southern States, and that some concomitant measure should be adopted to sweeten it a little to them. — Thomas Jefferson 4 Feb. 1818, in Thomas Jefferson: Writings1984 The drug's risks increase with the concomitant use of alcohol. an improvement in the facilities led to a concomitant improvement in morale Noun In the local bickering which was a concomitant of the grand campaigns of the wars, there may have been considerable fighting around fortifications, even if on a relatively small and brief scale. — Anthony Goodman, The War of the Roses, (1981) 1996 … there is a demand for schools, professional services, and such other concomitants of a full society as courthouses and jails. — Anthony Bailey, New Yorker, 25 May 1987 hunger, a lack of education, and other concomitants of poverty disease is all too often one of the concomitants of poverty
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Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective The assumption is that the use of self-driving cars will significantly reduce the number of car crashes, thus saving lives and foregoing the concomitant injuries. Lance Eliot, Forbes, "Here’s Why Some Are Vehemently And Diametrically Opposed To Self-Driving Cars," 5 Apr. 2021 Added to this, higher multifamily rents in these areas led to a rapid exodus, resulting in an increase in vacancy rates and concomitant softening of rents. Veena Jetti, Forbes, "Why 2021 Is A Watershed Year For The Multifamily Housing Industry," 25 Feb. 2021 However, there is little concomitant data to show how well the vaccine is impacting new U.K. infections. Kim Hjelmgaard, USA TODAY, "COVID-19 variant found in UK spreads 'like wildfire.' British experts fear what will happen if US won't lock down," 20 Feb. 2021 After a terrible year for independent artists and companies, this monopolization of the tech sector, and the concomitant homogenization of culture, is going to gather steam. Josephine Livingstone, The New Republic, "Monopolization Is Killing Art," 22 Dec. 2020 Another problem was a concomitant financialization of the economy, which diverted resources from the production of tangible goods into the arena of financial speculation, of which the financial crisis of 2007 to 2009 was one obvious result. Win Mccormack, The New Republic, "Meritocracy on Trial," 23 Dec. 2020 Their conception is shorn of any real emphasis on human sinfulness as a universal attribute, or on humility — and with it, the concomitant need for repentance, forgiveness, and mutual accountability. Daniel J. Mahoney, National Review, "The Spirit of Religion and the Spirit of Liberty," 23 Sep. 2020 Again, testing asymptomatic students would only create panic and pressure universities to close, with concomitant educational, economic and psychological harms. Martin Kulldorff, WSJ, "The Case Against Covid Tests for the Young and Healthy," 3 Sep. 2020 There is no evidence whatsoever that welfare states morph into total state control of the economy and produce a concomitant loss of freedom and prosperity. Bruce Bartlett, The New Republic, "Socialism Is as American as Apple Pie," 17 Aug. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Meanwhile, occupation forces committed scores of atrocities in both countries — some the typical concomitants of war, some simply gratuitous crimes, as in the torture dungeon at Abu Ghraib and the Nisour Square massacre. Ryan Cooper, TheWeek, "Bernie Sanders is America's best hope for a sane foreign policy," 7 Jan. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'concomitant.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of concomitant

Adjective

1607, in the meaning defined above

Noun

1621, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for concomitant

Adjective and Noun

Latin concomitant-, concomitans, present participle of concomitari to accompany, from com- + comitari to accompany, from comit-, comes companion — more at count

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Time Traveler for concomitant

Time Traveler

The first known use of concomitant was in 1607

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Statistics for concomitant

Last Updated

17 Apr 2021

Cite this Entry

“Concomitant.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/concomitant. Accessed 18 Apr. 2021.

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More Definitions for concomitant

concomitant

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of concomitant

 (Entry 1 of 2)

formal : happening at the same time as something else

concomitant

noun

English Language Learners Definition of concomitant (Entry 2 of 2)

formal : something that happens at the same time as something else : a condition that is associated with some other condition

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Comments on concomitant

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