coalesce

verb
co·​a·​lesce | \ ˌkō-ə-ˈles How to pronounce coalesce (audio) \
coalesced; coalescing

Definition of coalesce

intransitive verb

1 : to grow together The edges of the wound coalesced.
2a : to unite into a whole : fuse separate townships have coalesced into a single, sprawling colony— Donald Gould
b : to unite for a common end : join forces people with different points of view coalesce into opposing factions— I. L. Horowitz
3 : to arise from the combination of distinct elements an organized and a popular resistance immediately coalesced— C. C. Menges

transitive verb

: to cause to unite sometimes a book coalesces a public into a mass market— Walter Meade

Other Words from coalesce

coalescence \ ˌkō-​ə-​ˈle-​sᵊn(t)s How to pronounce coalesce (audio) \ noun
coalescent \ ˌkō-​ə-​ˈle-​sᵊnt How to pronounce coalesce (audio) \ adjective

Choose the Right Synonym for coalesce

mix, mingle, commingle, blend, merge, coalesce, amalgamate, fuse mean to combine into a more or less uniform whole. mix may or may not imply loss of each element's identity. mix the salad greens mix a drink mingle usually suggests that the elements are still somewhat distinguishable or separately active. fear mingled with anticipation in my mind commingle implies a closer or more thorough mingling. a sense of duty commingled with a fierce pride drove her blend implies that the elements as such disappear in the resulting mixture. blended several teas to create a balanced flavor merge suggests a combining in which one or more elements are lost in the whole. in his mind reality and fantasy merged coalesce implies an affinity in the merging elements and usually a resulting organic unity. telling details that coalesce into a striking portrait amalgamate implies the forming of a close union without complete loss of individual identities. refugees who were readily amalgamated into the community fuse stresses oneness and indissolubility of the resulting product. a building in which modernism and classicism are fused

Did you know?

Coalesce unites the prefix co- ("together") and the Latin verb alescere, meaning "to grow." (The words adolescent and adult also grew from alescere.) Coalesce, which first appeared in English in the mid-16th century, is one of a number of verbs in English (along with mix, commingle, merge, and amalgamate) that refer to the act of combining parts into a whole. In particular, coalesce usually implies the merging of similar parts to form a cohesive unit.

Examples of coalesce in a Sentence

a group of young reformers who gradually coalesced into a political movement The ice masses coalesced into a glacier over time.
Recent Examples on the Web In skilled hands, though, those parts coalesce into something absorbing, even graceful, and undoubtedly one of a kind. New York Times, 12 Feb. 2022 Senate Democrats need 51 votes to confirm a Supreme Court nominee, which would require all 50 members of their caucus to coalesce behind Biden's pick with Vice President Kamala Harris breaking a tie if no Republicans support the nominee. Clare Foran And Manu Raju, CNN, 28 Jan. 2022 Cinema was much the same in the late nineteenth century: yet to coalesce into itself. Nat Segnit, Harper’s Magazine , 16 Mar. 2022 Williams said that when there are more aerosols, the water vapor in the cloud is distributed among a greater number of droplets, so the droplets are smaller and less likely to coalesce into larger rain droplets. ABC News, 9 Jan. 2022 Many factors coalesce to establish the value of a house. Shawn Tully, Fortune, 14 Apr. 2022 Foremost, local officials need to coalesce around a common definition of local control. Michael R. Ford, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, 6 Jan. 2022 Brussels has also started to coalesce around a fifth sanctions package, this one likely to bar purchases of Russian coal and block certain Russian banks from doing business with European entities. The Editors, National Review, 7 Apr. 2022 In France, political identities tend to coalesce around views of the past and, on the right in particular, around the father of modern France, Charles de Gaulle. New York Times, 31 Mar. 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'coalesce.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of coalesce

circa 1541, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

History and Etymology for coalesce

Latin coalescere, from co- + alescere to grow — more at old

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Time Traveler for coalesce

Time Traveler

The first known use of coalesce was circa 1541

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Dictionary Entries Near coalesce

coaler

coalesce

coalescency

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Statistics for coalesce

Last Updated

17 May 2022

Cite this Entry

“Coalesce.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/coalesce. Accessed 24 May. 2022.

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More Definitions for coalesce

coalesce

intransitive verb
co·​alesce | \ ˌkō-ə-ˈles How to pronounce coalesce (audio) \
coalesced; coalescing

Medical Definition of coalesce

: to grow together

Other Words from coalesce

coalescence \ -​ˈles-​ᵊn(t)s How to pronounce coalesce (audio) \ noun

More from Merriam-Webster on coalesce

Nglish: Translation of coalesce for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of coalesce for Arabic Speakers

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