censure

noun
cen·​sure | \ ˈsen(t)-shər How to pronounce censure (audio) \

Definition of censure

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a judgment involving condemnation unorthodox practices awaiting the censure of the city council
2 : the act of blaming or condemning sternly The country faces international censure for its alleged involvement in the assassination.
3 : an official reprimand The lawyer's misconduct resulted in a letter of censure from the judge.
4 archaic : opinion, judgment

censure

verb
censured; censuring\ ˈsen(t)-​sh(ə-​)riŋ How to pronounce censure (audio) \

Definition of censure (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to find fault with and criticize as blameworthy She would tell him it was … no sign of a good pastor to be eternally censuring his flock.— Charlotte Brontë
b : to formally reprimand (someone) : to express official censure of (someone) While a vote to censure the president has no legal ramifications, it is a significant and rare symbolic vote of disapproval.— Emma Loop
2 obsolete : estimate, judge

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Other Words from censure

Verb

censurer \ ˈsen(t)-​shər-​ər How to pronounce censure (audio) \ noun

Choose the Right Synonym for censure

Verb

criticize, reprehend, censure, reprobate, condemn, denounce mean to find fault with openly. criticize implies finding fault especially with methods or policies or intentions. criticized the police for using violence reprehend implies both criticism and severe rebuking. reprehends the self-centeredness of today's students censure carries a strong suggestion of authority and of reprimanding. a Senator formally censured by his peers reprobate implies strong disapproval or firm refusal to sanction. reprobated his son's unconventional lifestyle condemn usually suggests an unqualified and final unfavorable judgment. condemned the government's racial policies denounce adds to condemn the implication of a public declaration. a pastoral letter denouncing abortion

Censure Has an Offical Connotation

Verb

Censure and its synonyms criticize, reprehend, condemn, and denounce all essentially mean "to find fault with openly." Additionally, censure carries a strong suggestion of authority and often refers to an official action. Criticize implies finding fault with someone’s methods, policies, or intentions, as in "the commentator criticized the manager’s bullpen strategy." Reprehend implies sharp criticism or disapproval, as in "a teacher who reprehends poor grammar." Condemn usually suggests a final unfavorable judgment, as in "the group condemned the court’s decision to execute the criminal." Denounce adds to condemn the implication of a public declaration, as in "her letter to the editor denounced the corrupt actions of the mayor’s office."

Examples of censure in a Sentence

Noun The country faces international censure for its alleged involvement in the assassination. a rare censure of a senator by the full United States Senate for misconduct Verb He was censured by the committee for his failure to report the problem. a vote to censure the President for conduct that was unbecoming to his office
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun After former president Donald Trump’s acquittal over the weekend, several Republicans who supported impeachment faced backlash and calls for censure from GOP officials in their home states. Katie Shepherd, Anchorage Daily News, "GOP Rep. Adam Kinzinger’s family lashed out at him for voting to impeach Trump: ‘We are thoroughly disgusted with you!’," 16 Feb. 2021 Fact-checkers noted that many of those Republican members still criticized Trump or called for a censure despite not voting to impeach Trump and have denounced QAnon. Emily Brooks, Washington Examiner, "Republicans in decent shape to win House majority in 2022," 9 Feb. 2021 Robert Anthony, a Sarpy County resident, voted for censure. Fox News, "Ben Sasse's anti-Trump statements draw more Nebraska backlash," 7 Feb. 2021 The House and Senate can remove members with a two-thirds vote or censure or reprimand with a majority. Jeffrey Collins, BostonGlobe.com, "Lawmakers who voted against Biden get blasted back home," 10 Jan. 2021 On social media, Osaka posted photos from the protest that were met with the inevitable hodgepodge of support and censure. Rob Haskell, Vogue, "Leading By Example: How Naomi Osaka Became the People’s Champion," 11 Dec. 2020 Burkons defended his actions in the matter, and was upset that his six colleagues knew the censure vote was to take place that night but that he was informed, via email, just 22 minutes before the meeting began. cleveland, "Burkons objects to proposed new Beachwood council rules, citing a lack of transparency," 29 Nov. 2020 Some Democrats, like Sen. Tim Kaine of Virginia, argued that a bipartisan censure resolution with Republican support would be a better outcome this time around. Peter Baker, Star Tribune, "Analysis: House managers aim arguments at nation and history," 11 Feb. 2021 The Wyoming GOP approved a censure resolution by a vote of 56 to 8. Caroline Linton, Rebecca Kaplan, CBS News, "Wyoming GOP censures Liz Cheney for impeachment vote," 7 Feb. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb The International Association of Fire Fighters, the parent organization of Cleveland’s firefighters union, has voted to censure Chief Angelo Calvillo. Cliff Pinckard, cleveland, "Gov. Mike DeWine sets benchmarks to lift coronavirus restrictions: The Wake Up for Friday, March 5, 2021," 5 Mar. 2021 Days later, the New York Post first reported, the majority of the company’s nine-member board voted to censure the executive. Washington Post, "Goya’s CEO falsely claims Trump is the ‘real,’ ‘legitimate’ president. Critics call for a boycott.," 1 Mar. 2021 The Wyoming Republican party voted to censure Cheney over her vote to impeach. Aaron Navarro, CBS News, "Liz Cheney calls on Republicans to "make clear we aren't the party of white supremacy"," 23 Feb. 2021 But local Republicans are moving to censure, and perhaps even mount primary challenges against, GOP elected officials who break with Trump, suggesting anti-Trump voices in the party have a long way to go before convincing the rank-and-file. W. James Antle Iii, Washington Examiner, "Top conservatives struggle to escape Trump's clutches," 18 Feb. 2021 The Louisiana GOP executive committee unanimously voted later that day to censure Sen. Bill Cassidy for his decision to convict Trump. Bryan Anderson, BostonGlobe.com, "North Carolina GOP votes to censure Burr after impeachment vote," 16 Feb. 2021 Louisiana Republicans voted on Saturday to censure Sen. Bill Cassidy for voting to convict Trump, and the North Carolina party did the same on Sunday to Sen. Richard Burr. Katie Shepherd, Anchorage Daily News, "GOP Rep. Adam Kinzinger’s family lashed out at him for voting to impeach Trump: ‘We are thoroughly disgusted with you!’," 16 Feb. 2021 The Louisiana GOP executive committee unanimously voted later that day to censure Sen. Bill Cassidy for his decision to convict Trump. Bryan Anderson, Star Tribune, "NC GOP votes to censure Sen. Burr after impeachment vote," 15 Feb. 2021 Louisiana Republicans voted to censure Sen. Bill Cassidy. Los Angeles Times, "Loyalty to Trump remains the fault line for Republicans," 14 Feb. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'censure.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of censure

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 4

Verb

1587, in the meaning defined at sense 2

History and Etymology for censure

Noun

Middle English, borrowed from Anglo-French & Latin; Anglo-French censure, borrowed from Latin cēnsūa "office of censor, assessment, moral oversight," from cēnsēre "to give as an opinion, perform the duties of a censor" + -ūra -ure — more at censor entry 1

Verb

derivative of censure entry 1, probably after Middle French censurer

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Time Traveler for censure

Time Traveler

The first known use of censure was in the 14th century

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Statistics for censure

Last Updated

7 Mar 2021

Cite this Entry

“Censure.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/censure. Accessed 8 Mar. 2021.

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More Definitions for censure

censure

noun

English Language Learners Definition of censure

 (Entry 1 of 2)

formal : official strong criticism

censure

verb

English Language Learners Definition of censure (Entry 2 of 2)

formal : to officially criticize (someone or something) strongly and publicly

censure

noun
cen·​sure | \ ˈsen-shər How to pronounce censure (audio) \

Kids Definition of censure

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : the act of finding fault with or blaming
2 : an official criticism

censure

verb
censured; censuring

Kids Definition of censure (Entry 2 of 2)

: to find fault with especially publicly

censure

noun
cen·​sure | \ ˈsen-chər How to pronounce censure (audio) \

Legal Definition of censure

: an expression of official disapproval a House resolution approving a censure of the representative

Other Words from censure

censure transitive verb

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Comments on censure

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