censure

noun
cen·​sure | \ ˈsen(t)-shər How to pronounce censure (audio) \

Definition of censure

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a judgment involving condemnation unorthodox practices awaiting the censure of the city council
2 : the act of blaming or condemning sternly The country faces international censure for its alleged involvement in the assassination.
3 : an official reprimand The lawyer's misconduct resulted in a letter of censure from the judge.
4 archaic : opinion, judgment

censure

verb
censured; censuring\ ˈsen(t)-​sh(ə-​)riŋ How to pronounce censuring (audio) \

Definition of censure (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to find fault with and criticize as blameworthy She would tell him it was … no sign of a good pastor to be eternally censuring his flock.— Charlotte Brontë
b : to formally reprimand (someone) : to express official censure of (someone) While a vote to censure the president has no legal ramifications, it is a significant and rare symbolic vote of disapproval.— Emma Loop
2 obsolete : estimate, judge

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Other Words from censure

Verb

censurer \ ˈsen(t)-​shər-​ər How to pronounce censurer (audio) \ noun

Choose the Right Synonym for censure

Verb

criticize, reprehend, censure, reprobate, condemn, denounce mean to find fault with openly. criticize implies finding fault especially with methods or policies or intentions. criticized the police for using violence reprehend implies both criticism and severe rebuking. reprehends the self-centeredness of today's students censure carries a strong suggestion of authority and of reprimanding. a Senator formally censured by his peers reprobate implies strong disapproval or firm refusal to sanction. reprobated his son's unconventional lifestyle condemn usually suggests an unqualified and final unfavorable judgment. condemned the government's racial policies denounce adds to condemn the implication of a public declaration. a pastoral letter denouncing abortion

Censure Has an Offical Connotation

Verb

Censure and its synonyms criticize, reprehend,condemn, and denounce all essentially mean "to find fault with openly." Additionally, censure carries a strong suggestion of authority and often refers to an official action. Criticize implies finding fault with someone’s methods, policies, or intentions, as in "the commentator criticized the manager’s bullpen strategy." Reprehend implies sharp criticism or disapproval, as in "a teacher who reprehends poor grammar." Condemn usually suggests a final unfavorable judgment, as in "the group condemned the court’s decision to execute the criminal." Denounce adds to condemn the implication of a public declaration, as in "her letter to the editor denounced the corrupt actions of the mayor’s office."

Examples of censure in a Sentence

Noun The country faces international censure for its alleged involvement in the assassination. a rare censure of a senator by the full United States Senate for misconduct Verb He was censured by the committee for his failure to report the problem. a vote to censure the President for conduct that was unbecoming to his office
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Many derided this response, pointing out the gulf between corporate censure and actual censorship. Rumaan Alam, The New Republic, "Woody Allen’s Memoir Is Shrouded in Secrecy. Why?," 1 Apr. 2020 The union filed disciplinary charges against Domingo on Friday, initiating a potentially lengthy process that could result in a fine, suspension, censure or expulsion. Jocelyn Gecker, USA TODAY, "Opera union board member alleges cover-up in Placido Domingo scandal," 2 Mar. 2020 The court could take actions against Patterson such as removal from office, suspension without pay, censure or a lifetime ban from being a judge. Ashley Remkus | Aremkus@al.com, al, "Indicted judge should resign and get off payroll, Alabama lawmaker says," 21 Jan. 2020 Experts have also cautioned that over-disclosing can be counterproductive, as patients fearful of public censure may choose to hide instead of seeking treatment. Max S. Kim, The New Yorker, "Seoul’s Radical Experiment in Digital Contact Tracing," 17 Apr. 2020 Resigning or facing a recall are other possibilities, as is censure by the board. Cathy Kozlowicz, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "A Menomonee Falls trustee called for 'civil disobedience' over Gov. Tony Evers' safer-at-home order," 6 Apr. 2020 While in the Senate, Coburn delivered babies for free after he was threatened with censure for violating Senate conflict-of-interest rules that prohibited him from receiving compensation for professional services. CBS News, "Tom Coburn, former Republican senator and Oklahoma physician, has died," 28 Mar. 2020 With the latest censure, those restrictions will extend to the rest of his term, which ends in May 2022. Ashley Mcbride, ExpressNews.com, "North East ISD board censures a fellow trustee — again," 17 Sep. 2019 Instead putting forth a censure resolution that suggests that the president put personal political gain over national interest. Beatrice Peterson, ABC News, "Rep. Tulsi Gabbard ends presidential campaign," 19 Mar. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb In the film, some of her harshest words for him come at a lavish ball, visually reminiscent of the scene where Laurie previously censured Meg. John Matteson, The Atlantic, "One Way the New Little Women Film Is Radical," 1 Jan. 2020 The vast majority of citizens chastised Gibbs and supported censuring her. Bill Laitner, Detroit Free Press, "Royal Oak commissioners censure member who flouted COVID rules at anti-Whitmer rally," 28 Apr. 2020 Murkowski is the second senator to raise censuring the president instead of impeachment. Susan Ferrechio, Washington Examiner, "Key centrist Senate Republican will vote against convicting Trump," 3 Feb. 2020 The Post examined 67 investigations in 12 states in which pharmacy boards censured Walgreens or placed pharmacies on probation for violating state regulations, including inadequate security and theft of drugs. Anchorage Daily News, "At height of opioid crisis, Walgreens handled nearly one in five of the most addictive drugs," 7 Nov. 2019 Despite the director-general’s lack of authority to investigate and censure WHO member states, Ms. Brundtland went ahead and held China’s feet to the fire anyway. Howard Lafranchi, The Christian Science Monitor, "Beneath Trump-WHO spat, a US-China race for leadership," 16 Apr. 2020 The central leadership has focused blame on local bureaucrats, including for censuring doctors who warned others about the infections. Steven Lee Myers, BostonGlobe.com, "China created a fail-safe system to track contagions. It failed.," 29 Mar. 2020 The central leadership has focused blame on local bureaucrats, including for censuring doctors who warned others about the infections. Steven Lee Myers, New York Times, "China Created a Fail-Safe System to Track Contagions. It Failed.," 29 Mar. 2020 Hong Kong’s flagship carrier, Cathay Pacific Airways Ltd. replaced its top brass and dismissed several employees after China censured the airline for perceived support for the Hong Kong protests. Washington Post, "Why Foreign Firms Are Walking on Eggshells in China," 6 Nov. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'censure.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of censure

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1587, in the meaning defined at sense 2

History and Etymology for censure

Noun

Middle English, borrowed from Anglo-French & Latin; Anglo-French censure, borrowed from Latin cēnsūa "office of censor, assessment, moral oversight," from cēnsēre "to give as an opinion, perform the duties of a censor" + -ūra -ure — more at censor entry 1

Verb

derivative of censure entry 1, probably after Middle French censurer

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Time Traveler for censure

Time Traveler

The first known use of censure was in the 14th century

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Last Updated

23 May 2020

Cite this Entry

“Censure.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/censure. Accessed 26 May. 2020.

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More Definitions for censure

censure

noun
How to pronounce censure (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of censure

 (Entry 1 of 2)

formal : official strong criticism

censure

verb

English Language Learners Definition of censure (Entry 2 of 2)

formal : to officially criticize (someone or something) strongly and publicly

censure

noun
cen·​sure | \ ˈsen-shər How to pronounce censure (audio) \

Kids Definition of censure

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : the act of finding fault with or blaming
2 : an official criticism

censure

verb
censured; censuring

Kids Definition of censure (Entry 2 of 2)

: to find fault with especially publicly

censure

noun
cen·​sure | \ ˈsen-chər How to pronounce censure (audio) \

Legal Definition of censure

: an expression of official disapproval a House resolution approving a censure of the representative

Other Words from censure

censure transitive verb

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More from Merriam-Webster on censure

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for censure

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with censure

Spanish Central: Translation of censure

Nglish: Translation of censure for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of censure for Arabic Speakers

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