censure

noun
cen·​sure | \ ˈsen(t)-shər How to pronounce censure (audio) \

Definition of censure

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a judgment involving condemnation unorthodox practices awaiting the censure of the city council
2 : the act of blaming or condemning sternly The country faces international censure for its alleged involvement in the assassination.
3 : an official reprimand The lawyer's misconduct resulted in a letter of censure from the judge.
4 archaic : opinion, judgment

censure

verb
censured; censuring\ ˈsen(t)-​sh(ə-​)riŋ How to pronounce censuring (audio) \

Definition of censure (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to find fault with and criticize as blameworthy She would tell him it was … no sign of a good pastor to be eternally censuring his flock.— Charlotte Brontë
b : to formally reprimand (someone) : to express official censure of (someone) While a vote to censure the president has no legal ramifications, it is a significant and rare symbolic vote of disapproval.— Emma Loop
2 obsolete : estimate, judge

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Other Words from censure

Verb

censurer \ ˈsen(t)-​shər-​ər How to pronounce censurer (audio) \ noun

Choose the Right Synonym for censure

Verb

criticize, reprehend, censure, reprobate, condemn, denounce mean to find fault with openly. criticize implies finding fault especially with methods or policies or intentions. criticized the police for using violence reprehend implies both criticism and severe rebuking. reprehends the self-centeredness of today's students censure carries a strong suggestion of authority and of reprimanding. a Senator formally censured by his peers reprobate implies strong disapproval or firm refusal to sanction. reprobated his son's unconventional lifestyle condemn usually suggests an unqualified and final unfavorable judgment. condemned the government's racial policies denounce adds to condemn the implication of a public declaration. a pastoral letter denouncing abortion

Censure Has an Offical Connotation

Verb

Censure and its synonyms criticize, reprehend,condemn, and denounce all essentially mean "to find fault with openly." Additionally, censure carries a strong suggestion of authority and often refers to an official action. Criticize implies finding fault with someone’s methods, policies, or intentions, as in "the commentator criticized the manager’s bullpen strategy." Reprehend implies sharp criticism or disapproval, as in "a teacher who reprehends poor grammar." Condemn usually suggests a final unfavorable judgment, as in "the group condemned the court’s decision to execute the criminal." Denounce adds to condemn the implication of a public declaration, as in "her letter to the editor denounced the corrupt actions of the mayor’s office."

Examples of censure in a Sentence

Noun The country faces international censure for its alleged involvement in the assassination. a rare censure of a senator by the full United States Senate for misconduct Verb He was censured by the committee for his failure to report the problem. a vote to censure the President for conduct that was unbecoming to his office
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun This means that Gee’s depiction of faculty members somehow singling out Latter-day Saints for censure is an unfounded interpretation of the actual research. The Salt Lake Tribune, "Jana Riess: Controversial Latter-day Saint book pulled from publication," 8 Sep. 2020 Claudia Rankine takes on the world point blank, writing about incidents such as the murder of Trayvon Martin, Hurrican Katrina, the censure of Serena Williams and other modern moments of racial division. Trevor Fraser, orlandosentinel.com, "10 short books to read on National Read a Book Day," 2 Sep. 2020 On Tuesday, the council rescinded the censure to avoid a potential lawsuit. Gustavo Solis, San Diego Union-Tribune, "National City unable to move on from Ron Morrison’s censure," 6 Aug. 2020 In choosing to press ahead with holding Mr. Pompeo in contempt of Congress, however, House Democrats are seeking a particularly personal — if symbolic — censure. Catie Edmondson, New York Times, "House Panel Moves to Hold Pompeo in Contempt of Congress," 28 Aug. 2020 Burkons was upset that he was not made aware of the censure prior to the meeting, as were the other six members of council. cleveland, "Beachwood council votes to censure Burkons over matter involving off-duty cop, resident," 18 Aug. 2020 His repression of ethnic minorities in the Xinjiang region continues to draw global censure. Washington Post, "A lion or a porcupine? Insecurity drives China’s Xi to take on the world.," 7 Aug. 2020 Mayor Alejandra Sotelo-Solis and council members Gonzalo Quinetro and Mona Rios voted in favor of another censure. Gustavo Solis, San Diego Union-Tribune, "National City unable to move on from Ron Morrison’s censure," 6 Aug. 2020 Although most observers of Galileo's censure and trial were concerned about his ideas, his daughter Sister Maria Celeste, a cloistered nun in the order of the Poor Clares, attended, at a distance, to Galileo's physical state. Hannah Marcus, Scientific American, "Galileo’s Lessons for Living and Working through a Plague," 1 Aug. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb In 1954, soon after the Army-McCarthy hearings that humiliated the senator and a 67-to-22 Senate vote to condemn or censure him, Gallup found that 34 percent of voters still approved of McCarthy. Washington Post, "Joseph McCarthy: An American demagogue who foreshadowed Trump," 27 Aug. 2020 The City Council voted 5-1 to censure member Paul Brandmire for suggesting a mask mandate could lead to yellow star badges that mark COVID-19-positive people. From Usa Today Network And Wire Reports, USA TODAY, "Back to school, bowling, Sharon Stone: News from around our 50 states," 19 Aug. 2020 The Judicial Conduct Commission can remove Gentry from office or can censure her or reprimand her, according to the commission's website. Scott Wartman, The Enquirer, "A case 'infected with sex.' Key questions from NKY Judge Dawn Gentry's disciplinary hearing," 14 Aug. 2020 This was the second time that Cano has abstained from voting to censure his political ally. Gustavo Solis, San Diego Union-Tribune, "National City unable to move on from Ron Morrison’s censure," 6 Aug. 2020 After the hearing, council would have decided whether to remove Langshaw from office, censure him or take other action, such as stripping him of committee assignments. Bob Sandrick, cleveland, "North Royalton Councilman Dan Langshaw resigns, takes parting shots at city leaders," 13 July 2020 The Ector County Republican Party voted on Saturday to censure Gov. Greg Abbott, accusing him of violating five party principles while using his executive power during the pandemic, Chron.com partner site the Midland Reporter Telegram reports. Houston Chronicle, "Houston coronavirus updates: What you need to know for July 6," 6 July 2020 After the hearing, council may decide whether to remove Langshaw from office, censure him or take other action, such as stripping him of committee chairmanships, city Law Director Tom Kelly said. Bob Sandrick, cleveland, "North Royalton City Council will charge Dan Langshaw over threatening call; Langshaw apologizes," 1 July 2020 The board could decide to censure Dina Serrano for her Facebook post, which would ban her from attending board events besides meetings. Krista Torralva, ExpressNews.com, "Edgewood ISD board calls special meeting to discuss vice president’s noose joke," 29 June 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'censure.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of censure

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 4

Verb

1587, in the meaning defined at sense 2

History and Etymology for censure

Noun

Middle English, borrowed from Anglo-French & Latin; Anglo-French censure, borrowed from Latin cēnsūa "office of censor, assessment, moral oversight," from cēnsēre "to give as an opinion, perform the duties of a censor" + -ūra -ure — more at censor entry 1

Verb

derivative of censure entry 1, probably after Middle French censurer

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Time Traveler for censure

Time Traveler

The first known use of censure was in the 14th century

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Statistics for censure

Last Updated

14 Sep 2020

Cite this Entry

“Censure.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/censure. Accessed 21 Sep. 2020.

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More Definitions for censure

censure

noun
How to pronounce censure (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of censure

 (Entry 1 of 2)

formal : official strong criticism

censure

verb

English Language Learners Definition of censure (Entry 2 of 2)

formal : to officially criticize (someone or something) strongly and publicly

censure

noun
cen·​sure | \ ˈsen-shər How to pronounce censure (audio) \

Kids Definition of censure

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : the act of finding fault with or blaming
2 : an official criticism

censure

verb
censured; censuring

Kids Definition of censure (Entry 2 of 2)

: to find fault with especially publicly

censure

noun
cen·​sure | \ ˈsen-chər How to pronounce censure (audio) \

Legal Definition of censure

: an expression of official disapproval a House resolution approving a censure of the representative

Other Words from censure

censure transitive verb

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