capture

noun
cap·​ture | \ ˈkap-chər, -shər\

Definition of capture 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1 : an act or instance of capturing: such as
a : an act of catching, winning, or gaining control by force, stratagem, or guile the capture of the city by enemy forces
b : a move in a board game (such as chess or checkers) that gains an opponent's piece
c : the absorption by an atom, nucleus, or particle of a subatomic particle that often results in subsequent emission of radiation or in fission
d : the act of recording in a permanent file data capture motion capture
2 : one that has been taken (such as a prize ship)

capture

verb
captured; capturing\ ˈkap-​chə-​riŋ , ˈkap-​shriŋ \

Definition of capture (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to take captive also : to gain control of especially by force capture a city
b : to gain or win especially through effort captured 60 percent of the vote
2a : to emphasize, represent, or preserve (something, such as a scene, mood, or quality) in a more or less permanent form … at any such moment as a photograph might capture— C. E. Montague
b : to record in a permanent file (as in a computer) The system is used to capture data relating to the buying habits of young people.
3 : to captivate and hold the interest of The performer captured our attention.
4 : to take according to the rules of a game A knight captured his pawn.
5 : to bring about the capture of (a subatomic particle)
6 astronomy : to draw into the gravitational influence of a larger body Asteroids were thought to be too small to capture a moon, but the moon might be a fragment that broke off.— Kenneth Chang

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Other Words from capture

Verb

capturable \ ˈkap-​chə-​rə-​bəl , -​shrə-​bəl \ adjective

Synonyms & Antonyms for capture

Synonyms: Noun

captive, internee, prisoner

Synonyms: Verb

acquire, attain, bag, bring in, carry, come by, draw, earn, gain, garner, get, knock down, land, make, obtain, procure, pull down, realize, reap, secure, win

Antonyms: Noun

captor

Antonyms: Verb

forfeit, lose

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Choose the Right Synonym for capture

Verb

catch, capture, trap, snare, entrap, ensnare, bag mean to come to possess or control by or as if by seizing. catch implies the seizing of something in motion or in flight or in hiding. caught the dog as it ran by capture suggests taking by overcoming resistance or difficulty. capture an enemy stronghold trap, snare, entrap, ensnare imply seizing by some device that holds the one caught at the mercy of the captor. trap and snare apply more commonly to physical seizing. trap animals snared butterflies with a net entrap and ensnare more often are figurative. entrapped the witness with a trick question a sting operation that ensnared burglars bag implies shooting down a fleeing or distant prey. bagged a brace of pheasants

Examples of capture in a Sentence

Noun

the capture of the city by enemy forces a Spanish treasure ship was the most valuable capture ever taken by that privateer

Verb

They were captured by enemy soldiers. using traps to capture mice The city was captured by the Romans. She captured 60 percent of the vote in the last election. The company plans on capturing a larger segment of the market. The show has captured the attention of teenagers.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

The 855 will do 4K, HDR10+ video capture in portrait mode at 60fps, and at 30 percent less power than the 845, said Judd Heape, senior director of product management at Qualcomm. Mark Hachman, PCWorld, "Meet Qualcomm's Snapdragon 855: AI boosts, a smarter camera, mobile gaming—and bye-bye, JPEG," 5 Dec. 2018 Game capture and streaming hardware company Elgato announced a new gadget today that can turn any existing DSLR camera, action cam, or standard video camcorder into a 4K webcam. Nick Statt, The Verge, "Elgato’s newest Cam Link will let live streamers turn a DSLR or GoPro into a 4K webcam," 27 Nov. 2018 The company will for example capture and store carbon and work with suppliers to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. BostonGlobe.com, "Life sciences bill sent to the governor," 8 June 2018 Instead, nearly every potential plan relies on a strategy called carbon capture and storage, or CCS. Avery Thompson, Popular Mechanics, "What Is Carbon Capture?," 13 Apr. 2018 According to a report by Netlab 360's Genshen Ye, more than 7,500 of them are actively being spied on by attackers, who are actively forwarding full captures of their network traffic to a number of remote servers. Sean Gallagher, Ars Technica, "Unpatched routers being used to build vast proxy army, spy on networks," 5 Sep. 2018 Barcelona are reported to have triggered the buyout clause for Sevilla defender Clement Lenglet, suggesting that the formal Catalan capture of the French centre back is imminent. SI.com, "Barcelona Trigger €35m Clement Lenglet Buyout Clause Ahead of 'Imminent' Transfer," 11 July 2018 The Trump administration ordered the Oct. 29 capture of a second suspect, Mustafa Imam, who was brought to Washington and pleaded not guilty. Spencer S. Hsu, latimes.com, "Libyan militia leader gets 22-year sentence in Benghazi attacks that killed U.S. ambassador," 27 June 2018 First came the capture of Ismail al-Eithawi, described as a close aide to ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi. Jeff Pegues, CBS News, "5 top ISIS leaders captured in latest blow to militant group," 10 May 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

The Christmas Chronicles Two siblings — portrayed by actors Darby Camp and Judah Lewis — attempt to follow through on a plan to capture Santa on camera. Lauren Rearick, Teen Vogue, "Christmas Movies on Netflix You Can Stream During the Holidays," 19 Dec. 2018 That image is a screenshot of the needle Vox staff captured on the night of the 2016 presidential election. Dara Lind, Vox, "America’s love-hate relationship with the New York Times election needle, explained," 6 Nov. 2018 Madrid, Spain The magic of Madrid is best captured on foot, strolling through the streets, stopping in a museum or sitting for a drink at La Alemana, a historic bar once frequented by Ava Gardner and Ernest Hemingway. Condé Nast Traveler, "The Best Cities in the World: 2018 Readers' Choice Awards," 9 Oct. 2018 This is Antarctica calling Completed in 2010, the IceCube observatory at the Amundsen–Scott South Pole Station in Antarctica aims to capture these exceptional encounters between neutrinos from beyond our solar system and atomic nuclei. Eoin O'carroll, The Christian Science Monitor, "Neutrino demonstration heralds a new way of observing the cosmos," 12 July 2018 But the true value, from a human perspective, is how the project captured and preserved the perspective of all the unsung heroes of the Apollo missions—not just the astronauts who were front and center in the public eye. Jennifer Ouellette, Ars Technica, "Behind-the-scenes audio from Apollo 11 mission made public for first time," 12 Nov. 2018 Her main contact is with a wealthy woman named Charlotte (Edie Falco), whose own son was captured and later successfully ransomed. Soren Andersen, The Seattle Times, "‘Viper Club’: Susan Sarandon brings grace, heartbreaking power to hostage drama," 30 Oct. 2018 Tuesday's summit meeting between President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has captured the attention and imagination of the entire world -- except, that is, in North Korea itself. Samuel Chamberlain, Fox News, "North Korean state media quiet about summit until after Kim's arrival in Singapore," 2 Oct. 2018 The friction of the generator capturing that braking energy is enough to slightly slow the truck. Matthew Jancer, Popular Mechanics, "Ram 1500 eTorque: Why the Electrified Pickup Truck Is Even Better," 19 Sep. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'capture.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of capture

Noun

circa 1542, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1574, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for capture

Noun

Middle French, from Latin captura, from captus — see captive entry 1

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Statistics for capture

Last Updated

4 Jan 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for capture

The first known use of capture was circa 1542

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More Definitions for capture

capture

noun

English Language Learners Definition of capture

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: the act of taking and holding someone as a prisoner or of being taken as a prisoner

: the act of getting control of something

: the act of putting information in a form that a computer can use or read

capture

verb

English Language Learners Definition of capture (Entry 2 of 2)

: to take and hold (someone) as a prisoner especially by using force

: to catch (an animal)

: to get control of (a place) especially by using force

capture

verb
cap·​ture | \ ˈkap-chər \
captured; capturing

Kids Definition of capture

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to take and hold especially by force The eagle captured its prey.
2 : to win or get through effort The candidate captured more than half the vote.
3 : to get and hold The seaweed strewn about … had captured her attention.— Kevin Henkes, Olive's Ocean
4 : to put into a lasting form She captured the scene in a photo.

capture

noun

Kids Definition of capture (Entry 2 of 2)

: the act of taking and holding especially by force

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More from Merriam-Webster on capture

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for capture

Spanish Central: Translation of capture

Nglish: Translation of capture for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of capture for Arabic Speakers

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