reap

verb
\ ˈrēp How to pronounce reap (audio) \
reaped; reaping; reaps

Definition of reap

transitive verb

1a(1) : to cut with a sickle, scythe, or reaping machine
(2) : to clear of a crop by reaping
b : to gather by reaping : harvest
2 : obtain, win

intransitive verb

: to reap something

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Synonyms for reap

Synonyms

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Examples of reap in a Sentence

She is now reaping the benefits of her hard work. He reaped large profits from his investments. The workers were out reaping the crops. The workers were out reaping in the fields.
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Recent Examples on the Web Often, the negatives in the short term are necessary in order to reap the long-term benefits. Expert Panel, Forbes, 1 Sep. 2021 As many parents await COVID-19 vaccine approval for their kids aged 12 and younger, there may be a way for some children to reap the shot's protective benefits: breast milk. Miriam Fauzia, USA TODAY, 31 Aug. 2021 That put the driller in a strong position to reap the benefits of this year’s crude rally while also reducing its overall emissions. BostonGlobe.com, 2 Aug. 2021 All-Star to reap the benefits of quick reflexes and coordination. Jen Murphy, WSJ, 10 July 2021 Companies that focus on creating a strong culture of diversity and inclusion reap several benefits, including greater innovation, stronger employee engagement and productivity, and a positive impact on their bottom line. Lorraine Hariton, Fortune, 7 July 2021 But don't overdo it with this potent nut since eating too many Brazil nuts can lead to selenium toxicity; stick with 1 or 2 daily to reap the nutritional benefits. Ethan Millman, Rolling Stone, 4 June 2021 Researchers are not sure how much a person would have to meditate, or for how long, to reap the practice’s benefits. Annie Lowrey, The Atlantic, 4 June 2021 People don't need to have an intense session at the gym to achieve the activity level necessary to reap the benefits, said Bethany Barone Gibbs, lead author of the AHA's scientific statement. Tara John, CNN, 3 June 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'reap.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of reap

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a(1)

History and Etymology for reap

Middle English repen, from Old English reopan

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Learn More About reap

Time Traveler for reap

Time Traveler

The first known use of reap was before the 12th century

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Dictionary Entries Near reap

reannex

reap

reaper

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Statistics for reap

Last Updated

12 Sep 2021

Cite this Entry

“Reap.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/reap. Accessed 18 Sep. 2021.

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More Definitions for reap

reap

verb

English Language Learners Definition of reap

: to get (something, such as a reward) as a result of something that you have done
: to cut and collect (a plant, crop, etc.) from a field

reap

verb
\ ˈrēp How to pronounce reap (audio) \
reaped; reaping

Kids Definition of reap

1 : to cut (as grain) or clear (as a field) with a sickle, scythe, or machine
2 : harvest entry 2 sense 1 reap a crop
3 : to get as a result You'll reap the benefit of your hard work.

More from Merriam-Webster on reap

Nglish: Translation of reap for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of reap for Arabic Speakers

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