cannonball

noun
can·​non·​ball | \ ˈka-nən-ˌbȯl How to pronounce cannonball (audio) \

Definition of cannonball

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a usually round solid missile made for firing from a cannon
2 : a jump into water made with the arms holding the knees tight against the chest
3 : a hard flat tennis service
4 : an express train

cannonball

verb
cannonballed; cannonballing; cannonballs

Definition of cannonball (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

: to travel with great speed

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Examples of cannonball in a Sentence

Verb a dune buggy came recklessly cannonballing down the crowded beach
Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Oh, what if after that first step so small, Neil’s giant leap had been a cannonball? Washington Post, "Style Invitational Week 1410: Legends of the fall," 12 Nov. 2020 Dan Coates, president of the Archaeological Society of the Northern Chesapeake, said that cannonball’s provenance is hard to determine. James Whitlow, baltimoresun.com, "Cannonball possibly dating back to 1800s and designed for naval warfare found in Bel Air," 23 Sep. 2020 That bent spacetime causes the path of a free-falling object to curve, resulting in the parabolic arc of a cannonball on Earth or the elliptical orbit of the Moon. Adrian Cho, Science | AAAS, "Famous shadow of black hole provides novel test for new theories of gravity," 2 Oct. 2020 Alkire said the office was notified of the cannonball at 10:07 a.m. Tuesday. James Whitlow, baltimoresun.com, "Cannonball possibly dating back to 1800s and designed for naval warfare found in Bel Air," 23 Sep. 2020 The cannonball appears to be the same type used during the English Civil Wars. Alex Fox, Smithsonian Magazine, "A Construction Project Reveals Whale Bones Beneath a Road in Scotland," 23 June 2020 The Battle of Ridgefield left one particularly visible scar: a British cannonball still lodged in a corner post of the Keeler Tavern Museum today, though at the time the building was simply called the Keeler Tavern. Theresa Machemer, Smithsonian Magazine, "Skeletons Unearthed in Connecticut May Belong to Revolutionary War Soldiers," 9 Jan. 2020 The project unearthed other relics, including an iron cannonball and a large stone wall that may both be remnants of Leith’s 16th or 17th century sea defenses, according to the Herald. Alex Fox, Smithsonian Magazine, "A Construction Project Reveals Whale Bones Beneath a Road in Scotland," 23 June 2020 Also in 2019, a Civil War cannonball was discovered lodged in a walnut tree at a historic house in Independence, Mo. Fox News, "The last person to receive a Civil War-era pension died last week," 9 June 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Over the weekend, David, Victoria, and their kids joined Elton John and David Furnish on a yacht trip in the South of France for an Instagram-worthy day of bonding, sunbathing, and cannonballing into the sea. Erica Gonzales, Harper's BAZAAR, "Victoria and David Beckham Live Their Best Lives on a Yacht with Elton John and David Furnish," 26 Aug. 2019 In February 2017, Ford cannonballed into the market, investing $1 billion self-driving startup Argo. Alex Davies, WIRED, "Softbank Pours $2.25 Billion Into GM's Bid for Self-Driving Dominance," 31 May 2018 In what can be considered typical Harbaugh fashion at this point, the Wolverines coach went ahead and cannonballed into the poll wearing his trademark khakis and polo. Chris Kwiecinski, ajc, "Michigan’s Jim Harbaugh spends his bye week Saturday practicing his cannonball," 30 Sep. 2017 Amazon effectively cannonballed into the placid waters of the grocery industry by grabbing headlines with price cuts. Greg Trotter, chicagotribune.com, "5 lessons learned from Amazon's first week with Whole Foods," 31 Aug. 2017

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'cannonball.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of cannonball

Noun

1606, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1899, in the meaning defined above

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Time Traveler for cannonball

Time Traveler

The first known use of cannonball was in 1606

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Statistics for cannonball

Last Updated

25 Nov 2020

Cite this Entry

“Cannonball.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/cannonball. Accessed 20 Jan. 2021.

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More Definitions for cannonball

cannonball

noun
How to pronounce cannonball (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of cannonball

: a heavy metal or stone ball that is shot from a cannon

cannonball

noun
can·​non·​ball | \ ˈka-nən-ˌbȯl How to pronounce cannonball (audio) \

Kids Definition of cannonball

1 : a usually round solid missile (as of stone or metal) for firing from a cannon
2 : a jump into water made with the arms holding the knees tight against the chest

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