blast

noun
\ ˈblast How to pronounce blast (audio) \

Definition of blast

 (Entry 1 of 4)

1a : a violent gust of wind a cold blast of air
b : the effect or accompaniment (such as sleet) of such a gust a blast of freezing rain
2 : the sound produced by an impulsion of air through a wind instrument or whistle the blast of the shofar on Rosh Hashanah the trumpet's blast
3 : something resembling a gust of wind: such as
a : a stream of air or gas forced through a hole
b : a vehement expression of feeling … let out a great blast of mirth …— Marcia Davenport a blast of anger
c : the continuous blowing to which a charge of ore or metal is subjected in a blast furnace
4a : a sudden pernicious influence or effect got a blast of reality when she left home a blast of criticism … virtue preserved from fell destruction's blast— Shakespeare
b botany : a disease of plants marked by the formation of destructive lesions on leaves and inflorescences
5a : an explosion or violent detonation The blast killed eight people. a shotgun blast
b : the shock wave of an explosion felt the blast from several miles away
c sports : a forceful hit (as in baseball) or shot (as in soccer or golf) especially : home run
6 : speed, capacity, operation turned the water on full blast go full blast
7 : an enjoyably exciting experience, occasion, or event I had a blast. Their wedding was a blast. especially : party
8 : the sending of a message (such as a fax or an email) in multiple copies to numerous recipients at one time The campaign then sends Jane targeted messages via canvassers, phone calls, ads, and its increasingly sophisticated email blasts.— Tim Murphy often used before another noun a blast fax
blast from the past
: a striking reminder of an earlier time : something that excites nostalgia This picture is a real blast from the past.

blast

verb
blasted; blasting; blasts

Definition of blast (Entry 2 of 4)

intransitive verb

1 : blare music blasting from the radio
2 : to make a vigorous attack blasting away at her opponent
3a : to use an explosive blast through the wall
b : shoot They walked in and started blasting.
4 : to hit a golf ball out of a sand trap with explosive force
5 : to proceed rapidly or aggressively blasting down the ski slope

transitive verb

1a : to injure by or as if by the action of wind young crops being blasted by the hot dry wind
b : blight The entire crop was blasted by fungus. The injury blasted her dreams of winning a gold medal.
2a : to shatter by or as if by an explosive blasting out nearly all of the building's windows
b : to remove, open, or form by or as if by an explosive blast a hole through the wall blast away these barriers to progress …— Elmer Davis
c : shoot The gunman blasted him down.
3 : to attack vigorously blasting their opponents in the media
4 : to cause to blast off will blast themselves from the moon's surface
5 : to hit vigorously and effectively blasted a home run
6 : to play loudly blasting rock music on the stereo
variants: or blasto-

Definition of blast- (Entry 3 of 4)

: bud : budding : germ blastodisc
\ ˌblast \

Definition of -blast (Entry 4 of 4)

: formative unit especially of living matter : germ : cell : cell layer epiblast

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Examples of blast in a Sentence

Noun She opened the door and felt a cold blast. He was hit by a blast of water from the hose. The driver gave a long blast on his horn. the blast of the factory whistle The bomb blast killed eight people. Verb Workers were blasting rock where the new highway will go. The rock has been blasted away. The explosion blasted a hole in the side of the ship. The mayor was blasted by the local press. The judge blasted the lawyers for delaying the trial. Human rights groups have blasted the government for its treatment of political prisoners. He blasted his rival with a pistol. A gunship blasted enemy headquarters. They blasted the enemy plane out of the sky.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Christian Franklin's solo shot to open the inning for his 13th, Cayden Wallace's three-run blast to left-center for his 13th, and Cullen Smith's opposite-field liner that just cleared the left-field wall. Tom Murphy, Arkansas Online, 5 June 2021 Robbie Grossman's sacrifice fly pulled the Tigers to within four runs, and Jonathan Schoop crushed his second home run — a three-run blast — to cut his team's deficit to 7-6. Evan Petzold, Detroit Free Press, 5 June 2021 The unseasonable blast of warmth — 20 degrees above average — does come with some danger. Tim Harlow, Star Tribune, 4 June 2021 The blast registered as the equivalent of a small earthquake. Washington Post, 3 June 2021 Bundy gave up three home runs in the Memorial Day matinee: a two-run blast to Evan Longoria in the fourth, and solo shots to LaMonte Wade Jr. in the fifth and Mauricio Dubón in the sixth. Los Angeles Times, 1 June 2021 During his third deployment in Afghanistan, Crenshaw was hit by an IED blast, which left him completely blind. Sarah Elbeshbishi, USA TODAY, 31 May 2021 But Urshela’s blast to end a nine-pitch battle with reliever Travis Lakins Sr. Jon Meoli, baltimoresun.com, 14 May 2021 The Blue Devils broke open the game with the blast, which hit the camera deck in left field. Shannon Russell, The Courier-Journal, 14 May 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Bugatti doesn’t make any official claims for 60 mph times—these are regarded as a little passé these days by hypercar makers—but says the Super Sport can blast its way to 124 mph in 5.8-seconds and to 186 mph in just 12.1 seconds. Mike Duff, Car and Driver, 8 June 2021 The New York Stock Exchange traded gold and silver producer managed to blast above that unusual February high. John Navin, Forbes, 31 May 2021 From Illinois to Washington, D.C., trillions of horny, red-eyed critters are just about to burst out of their 17-year slumber to blast mating calls as loud as rock concerts. Saahil Desai, The Atlantic, 19 May 2021 Republicans were quick to blast the Democratic governor. From Usa Today Network And Wire Reports, USA TODAY, 19 May 2021 That pastime, however, consisted of making chemical explosives in his apartment and using them to blow up trees and blast deep craters in the ground in his suburban neighborhood, according to the FBI. Kevin Krause, Dallas News, 16 May 2021 With archvillain Darth Vader ready to blast our hero into nanoparticles, Luke suddenly feels the presence of Obi-Wan Kenobi, the deceased Jedi Knight who was once his mentor. David Kindy, Smithsonian Magazine, 10 May 2021 Critics from all sides were quick to blast the ruling. Fortune, 6 May 2021 Even in China, where propaganda has become increasingly pugnacious, the display was jarring: A photograph of a Chinese rocket poised to blast into space juxtaposed with a cremation pyre in India, which is overwhelmed by the coronavirus. BostonGlobe.com, 4 May 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'blast.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of blast

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

History and Etymology for blast

Noun

Middle English, from Old English blǣst; akin to Old High German blāst blast, blāsan to blow, Old English blāwan — more at blow

Verb

Middle English blasten, derivative of blast blast entry 1

Combining form

combining form from Greek blastós "shoot, bud, embryo, germ" — more at -blast

Noun combining form

combining form from Greek blastós "shoot, bud, embryo, germ," noun derivative from the base of blastánein "to bud, sprout, grow," of obscure origin

Note: The supposed base *melōdh- "protuberance, head" in Julius Pokorny, Indogermanisches etymologisches Wörterbuch (citing, in addition to blastós, Sanskrit mūrdhan- "head," Greek blōthrós "tall," Old English molda "top of the head") is improbable as an Indo-European root;a substratal origin is possible, but the semantic links are weak.

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Learn More About blast

Time Traveler for blast

Time Traveler

The first known use of blast was before the 12th century

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Statistics for blast

Last Updated

10 Jun 2021

Cite this Entry

“Blast.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/blast. Accessed 20 Jun. 2021.

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More Definitions for blast

blast

noun

English Language Learners Definition of blast

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a mass of air that moves very quickly and forcefully
: a mass of water, gas, heat, etc., that moves very quickly and forcefully through the air
: the loud sound made by a horn or a whistle

blast

verb

English Language Learners Definition of blast (Entry 2 of 2)

: to destroy, break apart, or remove (something) with an explosive
: to create (a space or opening) with explosives
: to strongly criticize (someone or something) especially in public

blast

noun
\ ˈblast How to pronounce blast (audio) \

Kids Definition of blast

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : the sound made by a wind instrument the blast of a whistle
3 : a strong gust of wind icy blasts of winter
4 : a stream of air or gas forced through an opening
5 : a very enjoyable experience The party was a blast.

blast

verb
blasted; blasting

Kids Definition of blast (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to break to pieces by an explosion : shatter blast rock
2 : to hit with great force He blasted a home run.
4 : to hit (someone or something) with something (as air or water) that is moving forcefully She blasted us with water from the hose.
5 : to make a loud unpleasant sound a television blasting
6 : to strongly criticize He was blasted for the mistake.
blast off
: to take off The rocket blasted off.

blast

noun
\ ˈblast How to pronounce blast (audio) \

Medical Definition of blast

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : an explosion or violent detonation
2 : the violent effect produced in the vicinity of an explosion that consists of a wave of increased atmospheric pressure followed by a wave of decreased atmospheric pressure

Other Words from blast

blast verb

blast

noun

Medical Definition of blast (Entry 2 of 2)

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