blast

noun
\ ˈblast How to pronounce blast (audio) \

Definition of blast

 (Entry 1 of 4)

1a : a violent gust of wind a cold blast of air
b : the effect or accompaniment (such as sleet) of such a gust a blast of freezing rain
2 : the sound produced by an impulsion of air through a wind instrument or whistle the blast of the shofar on Rosh Hashanah the trumpet's blast
3 : something resembling a gust of wind: such as
a : a stream of air or gas forced through a hole
b : a vehement expression of feeling … let out a great blast of mirth …— Marcia Davenport a blast of anger
c : the continuous blowing to which a charge of ore or metal is subjected in a blast furnace
4a : a sudden pernicious influence or effect got a blast of reality when she left home a blast of criticism … virtue preserved from fell destruction's blast— Shakespeare
b botany : a disease of plants marked by the formation of destructive lesions on leaves and inflorescences
5a : an explosion or violent detonation The blast killed eight people. a shotgun blast
b : the shock wave of an explosion felt the blast from several miles away
c sports : a forceful hit (as in baseball) or shot (as in soccer or golf) especially : home run
6 : speed, capacity, operation turned the water on full blast go full blast
7 : an enjoyably exciting experience, occasion, or event I had a blast. Their wedding was a blast. especially : party
8 : the sending of a message (such as a fax or an e-mail) in multiple copies to numerous recipients at one time The campaign then sends Jane targeted messages via canvassers, phone calls, ads, and its increasingly sophisticated email blasts.— Tim Murphy often used before another nouna blast fax
blast from the past
: a striking reminder of an earlier time : something that excites nostalgia This picture is a real blast from the past.

blast

verb
blasted; blasting; blasts

Definition of blast (Entry 2 of 4)

intransitive verb

1 : blare music blasting from the radio
2 : to make a vigorous attack blasting away at her opponent
3a : to use an explosive blast through the wall
b : shoot They walked in and started blasting.
4 : to hit a golf ball out of a sand trap with explosive force
5 : to proceed rapidly or aggressively blasting down the ski slope

transitive verb

1a : to injure by or as if by the action of wind young crops being blasted by the hot dry wind
b : blight The entire crop was blasted by fungus. The injury blasted her dreams of winning a gold medal.
2a : to shatter by or as if by an explosive blasting out nearly all of the building's windows
b : to remove, open, or form by or as if by an explosive blast a hole through the wall blast away these barriers to progress …— Elmer Davis
c : shoot The gunman blasted him down.
3 : to attack vigorously blasting their opponents in the media
4 : to cause to blast off will blast themselves from the moon's surface
5 : to hit vigorously and effectively blasted a home run
6 : to play loudly blasting rock music on the stereo
variants: or blasto-

Definition of blast- (Entry 3 of 4)

: bud : budding : germ blastodisc
\ ˌblast \

Definition of -blast (Entry 4 of 4)

: formative unit especially of living matter : germ : cell : cell layer epiblast

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Examples of blast in a Sentence

Noun She opened the door and felt a cold blast. He was hit by a blast of water from the hose. The driver gave a long blast on his horn. the blast of the factory whistle The bomb blast killed eight people. Verb Workers were blasting rock where the new highway will go. The rock has been blasted away. The explosion blasted a hole in the side of the ship. The mayor was blasted by the local press. The judge blasted the lawyers for delaying the trial. Human rights groups have blasted the government for its treatment of political prisoners. He blasted his rival with a pistol. A gunship blasted enemy headquarters. They blasted the enemy plane out of the sky.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Texas continues to see record COVID-19 case increases that have led county and state officials to place restrictions on reopening, blast businesses that are ignoring state health protocols and urge the public to stay home as much as possible. Rebecca Hennes, Houston Chronicle, "Houston coronavirus updates: What you need to know for June 30," 30 June 2020 Ehlers stormed the beach on D-Day, Monsoor died in Iraq protecting his fellow Navy SEALS from a grenade blast and Rubin survived the Holocaust and more than two years as a prisoner of war during the Korean War. Eliott C. Mclaughlin And Deanna Hackney, CNN, "Democrats want John Wayne Airport renamed after 'I believe in white supremacy' interview resurfaces," 28 June 2020 Throttle response is instantaneous, and the engine always rewards prods of the pedal with a surge in the back and a trombone-like blast from the exhaust. Don Schroeder, Car and Driver, "Tested: 1993 Caterham Super 7 Blends the Lightweight Purity of the Lotus 7 With A Modern Drivetrain," 28 June 2020 For a small payment, it would be placed in the oven for an initial blast of heat. The Economist, "Home Entertainment Cholent, a traditional Jewish dish, is a perfect lockdown meal," 27 June 2020 Blanton was one of three Klansmen eventually convicted in the Sept. 15, 1963 10:15 a.m. blast that killed 11-year-old Denise McNair and 14-year-olds Addie Mae Collins, Cythnia Wesley and Carole Robertson. Carol Robinson | Crobinson@al.com, al, "16th Street Baptist Church bomber Thomas Blanton dies in prison," 26 June 2020 The best remedy for your yard is the safest: a hard blast of cold water. Jeff Lowenfels, Anchorage Daily News, "Freaking out over aphids? Here’s what you should absolutely not do.," 25 June 2020 Sam Ward stood on 5th Street NW and watched the Lakota blast the nearby trees into a frenzy. Washington Post, "A low-flying ‘show of force’," 23 June 2020 The only disturbance is the occasional blast of a low-flying Air Force training jet. John Maccormack, ExpressNews.com, "Wind farms threaten unspoiled West Texas river and Air Force pilot training routes," 19 June 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Other outdoor sports have already had to adapt: An unusually warm winter recently pushed Norwegians skiers into an icy hangar, while Alps resorts regularly blast homemade powder across the slopes. Molly Glick, Popular Science, "Pro surfers hit artificial waves in the heat of the climate crisis," 30 June 2020 In the oppressive heat of the Covid-19 summer, US cities are suddenly reverberating with the crack and boom of fireworks that blast on into the small hours. Stephen Collinson With Caitlin Hu, CNN, "The world isn't laughing at America -- it's pitying us," 28 June 2020 Red dwarfs -- although smaller and dimmer than our sun -- will often blast out energetic flares than can destroy a planet's atmosphere. Fox News, "Scientists spot promising super-Earth planets just 11 light-years away," 27 June 2020 In between periods, the museum will close for an hour to blast the interior with an electrostatic spray. Andrea Sachs, Washington Post, "Cultural institutions reopen with a more hands-off approach," 25 June 2020 Lance Roberts of Fairbanks has supported Coghill for nearly 30 years but recently became a harsh critic, using his Fairbanks Conservatives newsletter to blast the sitting senator. James Brooks, Anchorage Daily News, "In Alaska primary elections, it’s Republican versus Republican, with dividends as the battleground," 22 June 2020 When banished to his room, for rudeness or cursing or being mean to the girls, Izidor would stomp up the stairs and blast Romanian music or bang on his door from the inside with his fists or a shoe. Melissa Fay Greene, The Atlantic, "Can an Unloved Child Learn to Love?," 18 June 2020 But asking every worker to sue or blast their employer on social media is untenable as a long-term solution. Nick Martin, The New Republic, "At-Will Employment Is the Real Cancel Culture," 17 June 2020 Trammell, the former Tigers great, believes Torkelson has the athleticism and arm strength to play third base, the internal drive to be something special and the natural power to blast home runs out of cavernous Comerica Park. Jeff Seidel, Detroit Free Press, "Why Tigers' Alan Trammell is sold on Spencer Torkelson: 'No ballpark's gonna hold Tork'," 11 June 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'blast.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of blast

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

History and Etymology for blast

Noun

Middle English, from Old English blǣst; akin to Old High German blāst blast, blāsan to blow, Old English blāwan — more at blow

Verb

Middle English blasten, derivative of blast blast entry 1

Combining form

combining form from Greek blastós "shoot, bud, embryo, germ" — more at -blast

Noun combining form

combining form from Greek blastós "shoot, bud, embryo, germ," noun derivative from the base of blastánein "to bud, sprout, grow," of obscure origin

Note: The supposed base *melōdh- "protuberance, head" in Julius Pokorny, Indogermanisches etymologisches Wörterbuch (citing, in addition to blastós, Sanskrit mūrdhan- "head," Greek blōthrós "tall," Old English molda "top of the head") is improbable as an Indo-European root;a substratal origin is possible, but the semantic links are weak.

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Time Traveler for blast

Time Traveler

The first known use of blast was before the 12th century

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Statistics for blast

Last Updated

3 Jul 2020

Cite this Entry

“Blast.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/blast. Accessed 5 Jul. 2020.

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More Definitions for blast

blast

noun
How to pronounce -blast (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of blast

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a mass of air that moves very quickly and forcefully
: a mass of water, gas, heat, etc., that moves very quickly and forcefully through the air
: the loud sound made by a horn or a whistle

blast

verb

English Language Learners Definition of blast (Entry 2 of 2)

: to destroy, break apart, or remove (something) with an explosive
: to create (a space or opening) with explosives
: to strongly criticize (someone or something) especially in public

blast

noun
\ ˈblast How to pronounce blast (audio) \

Kids Definition of blast

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : the sound made by a wind instrument the blast of a whistle
3 : a strong gust of wind icy blasts of winter
4 : a stream of air or gas forced through an opening
5 : a very enjoyable experience The party was a blast.

blast

verb
blasted; blasting

Kids Definition of blast (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to break to pieces by an explosion : shatter blast rock
2 : to hit with great force He blasted a home run.
4 : to hit (someone or something) with something (as air or water) that is moving forcefully She blasted us with water from the hose.
5 : to make a loud unpleasant sound a television blasting
6 : to strongly criticize He was blasted for the mistake.
blast off
: to take off The rocket blasted off.

blast

noun
\ ˈblast How to pronounce blast (audio) \

Medical Definition of blast

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : an explosion or violent detonation
2 : the violent effect produced in the vicinity of an explosion that consists of a wave of increased atmospheric pressure followed by a wave of decreased atmospheric pressure

Other Words from blast

blast verb

blast

noun

Medical Definition of blast (Entry 2 of 2)

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More from Merriam-Webster on blast

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for blast

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with blast

Spanish Central: Translation of blast

Nglish: Translation of blast for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of blast for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about blast

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