cortisol

noun
cor·​ti·​sol | \ ˈkȯr-tə-ˌsȯl How to pronounce cortisol (audio) , -ˌzȯl, -ˌsōl, -ˌzōl \

Definition of cortisol

: a glucocorticoid C21H30O5 produced by the adrenal cortex upon stimulation by ACTH that mediates various metabolic processes (such as gluconeogenesis), has anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive properties, and whose levels in the blood may become elevated in response to physical or psychological stress

called also hydrocortisone

Examples of cortisol in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web With an adaptogen blend primarily made up of ashwagandha extract and lemon balm powder, the brand notes that the product helps to reduce tension in the body and mind, while improving the body’s cortisol levels and nervous system response. Sydney Odman, The Hollywood Reporter, 11 Apr. 2022 People in a constant state of stress produce more of the hormone cortisol, which suppresses their immune system, increasing the risk for colds, viral illnesses and autoimmune diseases. NBC News, 26 Mar. 2022 Although the exact reasons are not yet known, this may be due to light’s effects on increasing levels of cortisol, a hormone that modulates the stress response or the effect of light on the amygdala, a part of the brain involved in emotions. Beth Ann Malow, The Conversation, 10 Mar. 2022 There were also findings from the study that the researchers want to dig into, one being that people who continued to have trouble breathing had lower levels of cortisol, the hormone that regulates stress. Julie Mazziotta, PEOPLE.com, 26 Jan. 2022 Numerous studies, recently summarized and published in the International Journal of Biometeorology, have shown that forest bathing significantly reduces levels of cortisol, the body’s principal stress hormone. Alan Lightman, The Atlantic, 15 Jan. 2022 Interacting with animals has been shown to decrease levels of cortisol (a hormone related to stress) and lower blood pressure. Aimee Gilbreath, Forbes, 5 Jan. 2022 Competitive or professional dancers have high levels of cortisol, the stress hormone, on the day of a competition or performance. Washington Post, 12 Nov. 2021 The original plan was to train dogs to detect heightened levels of cortisol, the stress hormone. From Usa Today Network And Wire Reports, USA TODAY, 3 May 2021 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'cortisol.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of cortisol

1951, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for cortisol

cortisone + -ol entry 1

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Time Traveler for cortisol

Time Traveler

The first known use of cortisol was in 1951

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Dictionary Entries Near cortisol

cortine

cortisol

cortisone

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Statistics for cortisol

Last Updated

29 Apr 2022

Cite this Entry

“Cortisol.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/cortisol. Accessed 19 May. 2022.

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More Definitions for cortisol

cortisol

noun
cor·​ti·​sol | \ ˈkȯrt-ə-ˌsȯl, -ˌzȯl, -ˌsōl, -ˌzōl How to pronounce cortisol (audio) \

Medical Definition of cortisol

: a glucocorticoid C21H30O5 produced by the adrenal cortex upon stimulation by ACTH that mediates various metabolic processes (as gluconeogenesis), has anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive properties, and whose levels in the blood may become elevated in response to physical or psychological stress

called also hydrocortisone

More from Merriam-Webster on cortisol

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about cortisol

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