cortisol

noun
cor·ti·sol | \ˈkȯr-tə-ˌsȯl, -ˌzȯl, -ˌsōl, -ˌzōl\

Definition of cortisol 

: a glucocorticoid C21H30O5 produced by the adrenal cortex upon stimulation by ACTH that mediates various metabolic processes (such as gluconeogenesis), has anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive properties, and whose levels in the blood may become elevated in response to physical or psychological stress

called also hydrocortisone

Examples of cortisol in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web

This can help balance hormonal output (cortisol would be the biggest as far as sleep is concerned) as much as possible. Lori Nickel, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "A trainer's advice for parents on the go hoping to stay fit," 12 June 2018 The trouble is European eels need to build up fat before their migration to the Sargasso Sea to breed, and higher levels of cortisol could delay the timing of this journey. National Geographic, "Some Rivers Are So Drug-Polluted, Their Eels Get High on Cocaine," 20 June 2018 Running lowers cortisol and allows creativity to flow. Martin Fritz Huber, Outside Online, "The Invisible Benefits of Running," 19 June 2018 Their body releases a flood of stress hormones such as cortisol and adrenaline. William Wan, BostonGlobe.com, "What separation from parents does to children: ‘The effect is catastrophic’," 19 June 2018 Another tasty mood-booster and tension tamer: dark cherries, which a 2012 study found to reduce cortisol and increase serotonin, a brain chemical that helps regulate mood. Tori Rodriguez, Woman's Day, "10 Ways to Use Your Senses to Beat Stress," 20 May 2016 This is likely because at night, your body can release higher levels of the stress hormone cortisol that may promote more bodily inflammation, including in your airways. Korin Miller, SELF, "9 Asthma Symptoms Absolutely Everyone Should Know," 1 June 2018 People who work more than 40 hours a week may experience higher levels of stress, which can change hormones like cortisol. Alice Park, Time, "Working Long Hours Can Raise the Risk of This Disease," 2 July 2018 Their body releases a flood of stress hormones such as cortisol and adrenaline. William Wan, BostonGlobe.com, "What separation from parents does to children: ‘The effect is catastrophic’," 19 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'cortisol.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of cortisol

1951, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for cortisol

cortisone + -ol entry 1

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Statistics for cortisol

Last Updated

26 Sep 2018

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Time Traveler for cortisol

The first known use of cortisol was in 1951

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More Definitions for cortisol

cortisol

noun
cor·ti·sol | \ˈkȯrt-ə-ˌsȯl, -ˌzȯl, -ˌsōl, -ˌzōl \

Medical Definition of cortisol 

: a glucocorticoid C21H30O5 produced by the adrenal cortex upon stimulation by ACTH that mediates various metabolic processes (as gluconeogenesis), has anti-inflammatory and immunosupressive properties, and whose levels in the blood may become elevated in response to physical or psychological stress

called also hydrocortisone

More from Merriam-Webster on cortisol

See words that rhyme with cortisol

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about cortisol

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