cortisol

noun
cor·​ti·​sol | \ ˈkȯr-tə-ˌsȯl How to pronounce cortisol (audio) , -ˌzȯl, -ˌsōl, -ˌzōl \

Definition of cortisol

: a glucocorticoid C21H30O5 produced by the adrenal cortex upon stimulation by ACTH that mediates various metabolic processes (such as gluconeogenesis), has anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive properties, and whose levels in the blood may become elevated in response to physical or psychological stress

called also hydrocortisone

Examples of cortisol in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web The interplay between cortisol and glucose is complex and insidious, triggering metabolic changes that can lead to diabetes and other chronic diseases. Akilah Johnson, ProPublica, "How COVID-19 Hollowed Out a Generation of Young Black Men," 22 Dec. 2020 Boyles helped Karns understand the compound trauma of the two shootings and how his PTSD flipped his body into fight-or-flight mode — the tingling in his neck, the tightness in his back — as cortisol and adrenaline flooded his veins. Washington Post, "Scarred by two shootings, would firing a gun help him heal or wound him again?," 16 Oct. 2020 Petting a dog, which lowers cortisol and elevates levels dopamine and oxytocin, is even better. Meghan Overdeep, Southern Living, "Science Says Looking at Cute Animals Is Good for Your Brain," 29 Sep. 2020 Studies have consistently shown that environments that mimic or allow access to the natural world lower blood pressure and cortisol levels, improve concentration, and strengthen the immune system. Sonner Kehrt, Wired, "The ‘Healthy Building’ Surge Will Outlast the Pandemic," 15 Dec. 2020 The production of stress hormones — namely cortisol — also slows. Washington Post, "Through crinkly plastic, fierce embraces fight the loneliness of covid-19," 7 Dec. 2020 Adrenaline wears off quickly — within 15 minutes or so — but cortisol levels can remain elevated for hours, even once the stressful event has passed. Kara Mcgrath, Allure, "The Science of Beauty: Physical Symptoms of Stress and Relief Tips," 3 Dec. 2020 On a scientific level, our cortisol levels go up when we are stressed out. Chronicle Advice Team, SFChronicle.com, "Pandemic Problems: I moved to the Bay Area right before the pandemic. How do I make new friends?," 11 Nov. 2020 Our skyrocketing cortisol levels and mandatory face coverings have fueled an inescapable maskne epidemic. Jolene Edgar, Allure, "The Demand for Plastic Surgery Is Booming Despite an Ongoing Pandemic. Why?," 27 Oct. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'cortisol.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of cortisol

1951, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for cortisol

cortisone + -ol entry 1

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Time Traveler for cortisol

Time Traveler

The first known use of cortisol was in 1951

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Statistics for cortisol

Last Updated

11 Jan 2021

Cite this Entry

“Cortisol.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/cortisol. Accessed 22 Jan. 2021.

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More Definitions for cortisol

cortisol

noun
cor·​ti·​sol | \ ˈkȯrt-ə-ˌsȯl, -ˌzȯl, -ˌsōl, -ˌzōl How to pronounce cortisol (audio) \

Medical Definition of cortisol

: a glucocorticoid C21H30O5 produced by the adrenal cortex upon stimulation by ACTH that mediates various metabolic processes (as gluconeogenesis), has anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive properties, and whose levels in the blood may become elevated in response to physical or psychological stress

called also hydrocortisone

More from Merriam-Webster on cortisol

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about cortisol

Comments on cortisol

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