burgeon

verb
bur·​geon | \ ˈbər-jən How to pronounce burgeon (audio) \
variants: or less commonly
burgeoned also bourgeoned; burgeoning also bourgeoning; burgeons also bourgeons

Definition of burgeon

intransitive verb

1a : to send forth new growth (such as buds or branches) : sprout
b : bloom when the flame trees and jacaranda are burgeoning— Alan Carmichael
2 : to grow and expand rapidly : flourish The market for her work has burgeoned in recent years. tiny events which burgeon into national alarums— Herman Wouk

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Did You Know?

Burgeon comes from the Middle English word burjonen, which is from Anglo-French burjuner; both mean "to bud or sprout." "Burgeon" is often used figuratively, as when P.G. Wodehouse used it in Joy in the Morning: "I weighed this. It sounded promising. Hope began to burgeon." Usage commentators have objected to the use of "burgeon" to mean "to flourish" or "to grow rapidly," insisting that any figurative use should stay true to the word's earliest literal meaning and distinguish budding or sprouting from subsequent growing. But the sense of "burgeon" that indicates growing or expanding and prospering (as in "the burgeoning music scene" or "the burgeoning international market") has been in established use for decades, and is, in fact, the most common use of "burgeon" today.

Examples of burgeon in a Sentence

The market for collectibles has burgeoned in recent years. the trout population in the stream is burgeoning now that the water is clean

Recent Examples on the Web

The question for America’s burgeoning leftist movement is whether the version of democratic socialism that Bernie Sanders first forged in Vermont can survive without Bernie Sanders. Matthew Zeitlin, The New Republic, "Bernie’s Red Vermont," 13 June 2019 The victory in Cook County, the second-most-populous county in the United States, is the latest in a burgeoning nationwide movement to ensure housing for returning citizens. Jake Bittle, Curbed, "The fight for fair-chance housing ordinances," 12 June 2019 Even its founder, once a superstar of the burgeoning conservative movement, is mostly remembered (if at all) as Buckley’s brother-in-law and sometime collaborator. Declan Leary, National Review, "Catholics vs. Libertarians in the 1960s," 11 June 2019 From there, its presence in popular culture burgeoned into a multitude of reality shows and documentaries. Fox News, "Scientists warn that 'storm chasers' are hurting research and causing danger," 5 June 2019 In fact, this phenomenon is already burgeoning in the Northeastern US. Megan Geuss, Ars Technica, "IEA: Nuke retirements could lead to 4 billion metric tons of extra CO2 emissions," 28 May 2019 But a new study published in the journal Nature raises a critical question: Just how accurate are these burgeoning at-home DNA tests (such as 23andMe and others), which may well influence consumers’ personal health decisions? Sy Mukherjee, Fortune, "Brainstorm Health: DNA Testing Accuracy, Marijuana Laws and the Opioid Crisis, Alkermes Stock," 2 Apr. 2018 Night said he isn’t done yet with his burgeoning pot empire. Hugo Martin, latimes.com, "Full vending machines. Pot on the pillow. What some California hotels are doing to attract marijuana smokers," 22 June 2018 But the growing phenomenon of straight young adults attending just to party, sometimes in large numbers, has burgeoned in recent years. Ashley Wong, USA TODAY, "Gay Pride parades used to mean protests. Now they're an excuse for straight kids to party," 22 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'burgeon.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of burgeon

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for burgeon

Middle English burjonen, from Anglo-French burjuner, from burjun bud, from Vulgar Latin *burrion-, burrio, from Late Latin burra fluff, shaggy cloth

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Statistics for burgeon

Last Updated

25 Jun 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for burgeon

The first known use of burgeon was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for burgeon

burgeon

verb

English Language Learners Definition of burgeon

formal : to grow or develop quickly

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More from Merriam-Webster on burgeon

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with burgeon

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for burgeon

Spanish Central: Translation of burgeon

Nglish: Translation of burgeon for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of burgeon for Arabic Speakers

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