sprout

verb
\ ˈsprau̇t How to pronounce sprout (audio) \
sprouted; sprouting; sprouts

Definition of sprout

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to grow, spring up, or come forth as or as if a sprout
2 : to send out new growth

transitive verb

: to send forth or up : cause to develop : grow

sprout

noun

Definition of sprout (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : shoot sense 1a especially : a young shoot (as from a seed or root)

b sprouts plural

(1) chiefly British : brussels sprout sense 2
(2) : edible sprouts especially from recently germinated seeds (as of alfalfa or mung beans)
2 : something resembling a sprout: such as
a : a young person

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Synonyms & Antonyms for sprout

Synonyms: Noun

bairn [chiefly Scottish], bambino, bud, chap [Southern & Midland], chick, child, cub, juvenile, kid, kiddie (also kiddy), kiddo, moppet, sprat, squirt, whelp, youngling, youngster, youth

Antonyms: Noun

adult, grown-up

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Examples of sprout in a Sentence

Verb

seeds sprouting in the spring Potatoes will sprout in the bag if kept in a warm place. The garden is sprouting weeds. The tree is already sprouting leaves. He sprouted a beard since the last time I saw him. She dreamed that her boss had sprouted horns. Hair sprouted on his face.

Noun

he earned the admiration of the neighborhood sprouts when he showed them how to make a slingshot the raspberry bushes began sending out sprouts in early spring
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Think: enormous red roses enveloped in ribbons sprouting from your wrist, or heaps of petals that look like bulbous bags of potpourri. Vogue, "Can the Corsage Ever Be Cool? Chloë Sevigny Says “Yes!”," 8 Apr. 2019 Movement, attacking, and pursuing victory are unified here to provide stable ground from which the game’s unique identities can sprout. Charlie Theel, Ars Technica, "Root is a terrific—and fully asymmetric—woodland wargame," 29 Sep. 2018 On display for the first time are some of the things that keep sprouting from the local soil. Joshua Levine, Smithsonian, "Travel to Southern France for a Dazzling Taste of Ancient Rome," 24 May 2018 Another number down the list would have drawn knowing nods within the microcosmos of horse racing intellectuals: The cost of breeding a mare with Scat Daddy, the blossoming sire merely 11 years old, had sprouted from $35,000 to $100,000. Chuck Culpepper, chicagotribune.com, "Scat Daddy, sire who died in 2015, dominates Kentucky Derby field in 2018," 5 May 2018 Instead of angels and saints, there were soldiers beheading one another; instead of Madonnas and Christs, there were pregnant women sprouting from acanthus buds. Junot Díaz, The New Yorker, "The Hunt for Mexico’s Heirloom Beans," 17 Apr. 2018 The book also showcases a forest full of cloud-like native dogwoods, yellow Lady Banks's rose as groundcover, and even flower-shaped fungus sprouting from leaf litter. Birmingham Magazine, AL.com, "Birmingham magazine's top pop culture picks for April," 17 Apr. 2018 The plant thrives on the rocky forest floor, sprouting from pockets where rain collects. Jenny Staletovich, miamiherald, "Judge clears way for Walmart in rare Miami forest. But legal battle continues | Miami Herald," 14 Mar. 2018 Over the past few weeks, parts of the Big Island, particularly in the Puna District, seem to have grown hair, as golden fibers as long as two feet have sprouted from the earth. Marie Salcido, Sunset, "Hawaii’s Big Island Is Growing…Hair?!," 22 Jan. 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

On January 12, a cotton sprout poked out of the lattice of a planter on the far side of the moon. Jill Kiedaisch, Popular Mechanics, "Seeds Have Sprouted on the Moon for the Very First Time," 15 Jan. 2019 The Brussels sprouts were roasted with olive oil, salt and granulated garlic. Carrie Dennett, The Seattle Times, "Grain bowls are trending. Here’s how to make your own.," 28 Nov. 2018 Otherwise, maybe just bite your tongue and pass the Brussels sprouts. Dylan Scott, Vox, "The data is clear: nobody actually fights about politics at Thanksgiving dinner," 21 Nov. 2018 As his house pares down, ornament sprouts on his person like an irrepressible efflorescence of his inner rococo. Kennedy Fraser, Vogue, "From the Archives: Karl Lagerfeld, The Impresario," 19 Feb. 2019 Vegetables: Prepare a batch of roasted Brussels sprouts, broccoli, cauliflower, asparagus, fennel, and so on, but also add in some chopped, shredded, or thinly-sliced raw veggies. Carrie Dennett, The Seattle Times, "Grain bowls are trending. Here’s how to make your own.," 28 Nov. 2018 Upon arrival, chef Katie Gilligan, one of Guevara's protégés, served us a lunch of heirloom tomato gazpacho and butter lettuce with walnut cream, rose-radish sprouts, squash, and marinated purslane and gave us a brief nutrition lecture. Alex Kuczynski, Town & Country, "How GroundSea Fitness Is Bringing West-Coast Wellness Trends Back to the Berkshires," 17 Oct. 2016 Imagine popping to the store to pick up your final ribbons, wrapping paper, and sprouts—only to find actual Kate Middleton browsing the novelty festive socks and Prince George checking out the slime offerings. Lucy Wood, Marie Claire, "Kate Middleton Took Prince George and Princess Charlotte Christmas Shopping at a Bargain Store," 24 Dec. 2018 Cook 3 to 5 minutes or until sprouts are tender, stirring twice. The Good Housekeeping Test Kitchen, Good Housekeeping, "Maple-Glazed Brussels Sprouts," 23 Oct. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'sprout.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of sprout

Verb

13th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for sprout

Verb

Middle English spruten, from Old English -sprūtan; akin to Old High German spriozan to sprout, Lithuanian sprausti to squeeze, thrust

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Learn More about sprout

Statistics for sprout

Last Updated

11 Apr 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for sprout

The first known use of sprout was in the 13th century

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More Definitions for sprout

sprout

verb

English Language Learners Definition of sprout

: to produce new leaves, buds, etc.
: to grow or develop (something)
: to appear suddenly and in large numbers

sprout

verb
\ ˈsprau̇t How to pronounce sprout (audio) \
sprouted; sprouting

Kids Definition of sprout

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to produce or cause to produce new growth The seeds of corn were sprouting.

sprout

noun

Kids Definition of sprout (Entry 2 of 2)

: a young stem of a plant especially when coming directly from a seed or root
\ ˈsprau̇t How to pronounce sprout (audio) \

Medical Definition of sprout

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to send out new growth : produce sprouts vascular endothelial growth factor…has been shown to spur blood vessels to sprout— Greg Miller

sprout

noun

Medical Definition of sprout (Entry 2 of 2)

: a new outgrowth (as of nerve tissue) resembling the young shoot of a plant segments of the axon above the injury…produce new sprouts— J. L. Marx

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More from Merriam-Webster on sprout

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with sprout

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for sprout

Spanish Central: Translation of sprout

Nglish: Translation of sprout for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of sprout for Arabic Speakers

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