sprout

1 of 2

verb

sprouted; sprouting; sprouts

intransitive verb

1
: to grow, spring up, or come forth as or as if a sprout
2
: to send out new growth

transitive verb

: to send forth or up : cause to develop : grow

sprout

2 of 2

noun

1
a
: shoot sense 1a
especially : a young shoot (as from a seed or root)
b sprouts plural
(1)
chiefly British : brussels sprout sense 2
(2)
: edible sprouts especially from recently germinated seeds (as of alfalfa or mung beans)
2
: something resembling a sprout: such as
a
: a young person

Examples of sprout in a Sentence

Verb seeds sprouting in the spring Potatoes will sprout in the bag if kept in a warm place. The garden is sprouting weeds. The tree is already sprouting leaves. He sprouted a beard since the last time I saw him. She dreamed that her boss had sprouted horns. Hair sprouted on his face. Noun he earned the admiration of the neighborhood sprouts when he showed them how to make a slingshot the raspberry bushes began sending out sprouts in early spring
Recent Examples on the Web
Verb
The microgreens sprouted shockingly quickly, within 24 hours of being planted. Rachel Ahrnsen, Better Homes & Gardens, 11 Apr. 2024 Since recreational marijuana became legal in July, some Prince George’s officials have heaved about the prospect of dispensaries sprouting up around the county, especially in areas where smoke and liquor shops are more plentiful than grocery stores and playgrounds. Lateshia Beachum, Washington Post, 10 Apr. 2024 The idea sprouted while Pinter, 43, was pregnant with the couple’s fourth child, daughter Goldie Patricia. Julia Moore, Peoplemag, 9 Apr. 2024 Why? April 5, 2024 When the flowers blossomed in 2019, a debate sprouted among airport officials and native plant experts over whether the flowers sprang up on their own or were planted. Summer Lin, Los Angeles Times, 8 Apr. 2024 Dandelion flowers sprout from the cracks in the pavement, and the property looks like a prairie dotted with the yellow weed. Discover Magazine, 4 Apr. 2024 Since their beginnings in the 1950s, dollar stores have mushroomed across the U.S., sprouting up in urban and rural communities alike. Aimee Picchi, CBS News, 15 Mar. 2024 The organization sprouted from an incognito Facebook account known as Lily Waterfield that was meant to hold leaders accountable and acknowledge opportunities to improve the community. Kira Caspers, The Arizona Republic, 29 Mar. 2024 With 65,000 five-star reviews, customers praise Sky Organics’ castor oil for its ability to strengthen strands, sprout new growth, and retain length. Jenn Barthole, Glamour, 29 Mar. 2024
Noun
Plants have more time to bloom and sprout leaves, releasing allergy-inducing pollen when there are longer periods of freeze-free days. Daniel Peck, ABC News, 20 Mar. 2024 Often, the best help is the kind that sprouts organically from within the local community itself. Hannah Fish, The Christian Science Monitor, 15 Feb. 2024 Her outfit—look 10 from the show—was affixed with all the bells and whistles: a lightweight, layered peplum that extended into a train, white embellishments on the bodice, and 3D sprouts emerging from the peplum and train. Hannah Jackson, Vogue, 11 Mar. 2024 Crispy, smoky sprouts contrast beautifully with sweet tangles of jammy caramelized onions. The Indianapolis Star, 19 Feb. 2024 In a large bowl, add the Brussels sprouts and toss well with all the other ingredients, minus the butter. Olivia Evans, The Courier-Journal, 30 Jan. 2024 When the sprouts are big enough, they are transplanted in uncultivated lands around their town owned or rented by the family. Tucker Harris, Washington Post, 23 Jan. 2024 Brussels sprouts can be ridiculously expensive, especially when not in season. Michelle Darrisaw, Southern Living, 13 Feb. 2024 Menu: first-course, warm Brussels sprouts salad; second-course, fried chicken tacos, veggie risotto, steaks and frites; third-course, two chocolate chip cookie dough stuffed beignets. The Courier-Journal, 5 Feb. 2024

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'sprout.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Verb

Middle English spruten, from Old English -sprūtan; akin to Old High German spriozan to sprout, Lithuanian sprausti to squeeze, thrust

First Known Use

Verb

13th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Time Traveler
The first known use of sprout was in the 13th century

Dictionary Entries Near sprout

Cite this Entry

“Sprout.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/sprout. Accessed 16 Apr. 2024.

Kids Definition

sprout

1 of 2 verb
1
: to grow or spring up as or as if a sprout
2
: to send out new growth
potatoes kept too warm will sprout in the bag
3
: to send forth or up : cause to develop : grow

sprout

2 of 2 noun
1
a
: shoot entry 2 sense 1a
especially : a young shoot (as from a seed or root)
2
plural : edible young shoots especially from recently germinated seeds (as of alfalfa)

Medical Definition

sprout

1 of 2 intransitive verb
: to send out new growth : produce sprouts
vascular endothelial growth factor … has been shown to spur blood vessels to sproutGreg Miller

sprout

2 of 2 noun
: a new outgrowth (as of nerve tissue) resembling the young shoot of a plant
segments of the axon above the injury … produce new sproutsJ. L. Marx

More from Merriam-Webster on sprout

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