sprout

verb
\ˈsprau̇t \
sprouted; sprouting; sprouts

Definition of sprout 

(Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to grow, spring up, or come forth as or as if a sprout

2 : to send out new growth

transitive verb

: to send forth or up : cause to develop : grow

sprout

noun

Definition of sprout (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : shoot sense 1a especially : a young shoot (as from a seed or root)

b sprouts plural

(1) chiefly British : brussels sprout sense 2

(2) : edible sprouts especially from recently germinated seeds (as of alfalfa or mung beans)

2 : something resembling a sprout: such as

a : a young person

b : scion sense 2

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Synonyms & Antonyms for sprout

Synonyms: Noun

bairn [chiefly Scottish], bambino, bud, chap [Southern & Midland], chick, child, cub, juvenile, kid, kiddie (also kiddy), kiddo, moppet, sprat, squirt, whelp, youngling, youngster, youth

Antonyms: Noun

adult, grown-up

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Examples of sprout in a Sentence

Verb

seeds sprouting in the spring Potatoes will sprout in the bag if kept in a warm place. The garden is sprouting weeds. The tree is already sprouting leaves. He sprouted a beard since the last time I saw him. She dreamed that her boss had sprouted horns. Hair sprouted on his face.

Noun

he earned the admiration of the neighborhood sprouts when he showed them how to make a slingshot the raspberry bushes began sending out sprouts in early spring
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

In this task, the Monitor is privileged to be the only American news organization participating in Impact Journalism Day, and to share with our readers the seeds of constructive, hopeful journalism that are sprouting in every corner of the globe. Mark Sappenfield, The Christian Science Monitor, "Global voices on progress: a special project of the Monitor Daily," 21 June 2018 Soon, there could be a number of indie operating systems for your smartwatch, sprouting from an open-source code project launched last week. Shannon Liao, The Verge, "New indie project could lead to a bunch of Wear OS smartwatch competitors," 3 Apr. 2018 Even before becoming a beauty editor and the grays started sprouting, I was tempted to transform my look. Lauren Levinson, Glamour, "Seeing Women in Their 30s With Gray Roots Inspired Me to Leave Mine Alone," 2 Apr. 2018 That's right: President Donald Trump was photographed in the Oval Office today with a full bounty of greens sprouting from his breast pocket. Cam Wolf, GQ, "Donald Trump Stashed an Entire Side Salad in His Breast Pocket," 15 Mar. 2018 In mid-August set out broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower and Brussels sprouts transplants, and in late August sow beets, carrots, radishes, spinach, lettuce and other leaf and root crops. Neil Sperry, star-telegram, "Here’s your gardening to-do list for the second part of the summer," 11 July 2018 Fashioned by a home cook making a meal, Bao sprouts a tiny body under his big head. Kaly Soto, New York Times, "The Creator of ‘Bao’ on That Twist: ‘Part of Me Wanted to Shock Audiences’," 27 June 2018 Based on interviews with nearly a dozen workers, system checks are lax enough that a sub-industry of fake reviews has sprouted. Rick Paulas, Longreads, "Sex Workers vs. The Internet," 15 June 2018 The planters are small oases on Hartford’s corners and streets: five-feet-by-five feet, sprouting kale and tomatoes and radish that anyone in the city is free to pick. Matthew Ormseth, courant.com, "A Planter On Every Corner: Whole Foods and Charter Oak To Sprout Fruits and Vegetables Throughout Hartford," 14 June 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Raw sprouts are dangerous because of their growing process. David J. Neal, charlotteobserver, "Nine things a food safety lawyer won’t eat, at home or in a restaurant," 6 July 2018 Raw sprouts are dangerous because of their growing process. David J. Neal, ajc, "Nine things this top food safety lawyer won’t eat at home or in a restaurant," 26 June 2018 Raw sprouts are dangerous because of their growing process. David J. Neal, miamiherald, "Here are the 9 things this top food safety lawyer won't eat at home or in a restaurant," 19 June 2018 Broccoli, cabbage, bok choy, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, and kale are all great options for filling your plate. Jaclyn London, Ms, Rd, Cdn, Good Housekeeping, "It's Official: Cauliflower Is Just as Good for You as Colorful Veggies," 31 May 2018 Three huge hangars capped in a tan fabric covering sprout-like giant mushrooms, visible from miles away. Eric Schmitt, New York Times, "A Shadowy War’s Newest Front: A Drone Base Rising From Saharan Dust," 22 Apr. 2018 Michelle Pemberton/IndyStar Indianapolis' latest bastion of roasted Brussels sprouts (in apple bacon caramel) and spicy tuna poke (with rainbow carrots) is not a free-wheeling Modern American restaurant in Fountain Square. Liz Biro, Indianapolis Star, "Why restaurants in Indianapolis hotels don't have to suck," 12 Apr. 2018 Yes, yes, hardworking Scandinavians developed Swedish meatballs and intrepid chefs from Belgium probably discovered the nutritional value of Brussels sprouts. Joe Queenan, WSJ, "Parmesan vs. Sarmesan: How Dare the Europeans Move Our Cheese," 25 May 2018 In 2017, Fullei Fresh sold more than 2 million pounds of bean sprouts and over 200,000 pounds of alfalfa sprouts. Joseph A. Mann Jr., miamiherald, "Fullei Fresh puts sprouts on your table | Miami Herald," 17 May 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'sprout.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of sprout

Verb

13th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for sprout

Verb

Middle English spruten, from Old English -sprūtan; akin to Old High German spriozan to sprout, Lithuanian sprausti to squeeze, thrust

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Learn More about sprout

Statistics for sprout

Last Updated

7 Nov 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for sprout

The first known use of sprout was in the 13th century

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More Definitions for sprout

sprout

verb

English Language Learners Definition of sprout

: to produce new leaves, buds, etc.

: to grow or develop (something)

: to appear suddenly and in large numbers

sprout

verb
\ˈsprau̇t \
sprouted; sprouting

Kids Definition of sprout

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to produce or cause to produce new growth The seeds of corn were sprouting.

sprout

noun

Kids Definition of sprout (Entry 2 of 2)

: a young stem of a plant especially when coming directly from a seed or root

\ˈsprau̇t \

Medical Definition of sprout 

(Entry 1 of 2)

: to send out new growth : produce sprouts vascular endothelial growth factor…has been shown to spur blood vessels to sprout— Greg Miller

sprout

noun

Medical Definition of sprout (Entry 2 of 2)

: a new outgrowth (as of nerve tissue) resembling the young shoot of a plant segments of the axon above the injury…produce new sprouts— J. L. Marx

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