bud

1 of 2

noun

1
: a small lateral or terminal protuberance on the stem of a plant that may develop into a flower, leaf, or shoot
2
: something not yet mature or at full development: such as
a
: an incompletely opened flower
b
c(1)
: an outgrowth of an organism that differentiates into a new individual : gemma
(2)
: an outgrowth having the potential to differentiate and grow into a definitive organ or part : primordium
an embryonic limb bud
3
: buddy
4
slang : marijuana
The dance floor is packed. Red and blue lights filter through cigarette and bud smoke. T-Love

bud

2 of 2

verb

budded; budding

intransitive verb

1
of a plant
a
: to set or put forth buds
b
: to commence growth from buds
2
: to grow or develop from or as if from a bud
3
: to reproduce asexually especially by the pinching off of a small part of the parent

transitive verb

1
: to produce or develop from buds
2
: to cause (a plant) to bud
3
: to insert a bud from a plant of one kind into an opening in the bark of (a plant of another kind) usually in order to propagate a desired variety
budder noun
Phrases
in the bud
: in an early stage of development
nipped the rebellion in the bud

Example Sentences

Noun The bush has plenty of buds but no flowers yet. that sitcom star is still a bud, so all he needs right now are looks and personality Verb The trees budded early this spring.
Recent Examples on the Web
Noun
But recent editorials in The People’s Daily—the Chinese Communist Party’s flagship publication—continued to call on China’s population to stick with its approach of staying vigilant and nipping outbreaks in the bud. Sha Hua, WSJ, 18 Nov. 2022 The best way to nip signs of aging in the bud is by incorporating anti-aging products into your skincare regimen. Sophie Dweck, Town & Country, 16 Nov. 2022 Nipped in the bud: The Ohio Supreme Court unanimously ruled Thursday that the Cleveland Botanical Garden’s hours, parking and admission fees do not violate an 1882 deed and land donation. Jeremy Pelzer, cleveland, 21 Oct. 2022 As gossip swirls around you, nipping it in the bud might be difficult due to uncertainty and a lack of solid evidence on all sides. Tarot Astrologers, Chicago Tribune, 20 Oct. 2022 Exfoliating, acne-fighting ingredients will nip it in the bud. Sarah Madaus, SELF, 11 Oct. 2022 Conversely, nothing nips it in the bud like harsh rejection, especially for employees who are stepping out of their comfort zones. Eugene Xiong, Forbes, 11 Oct. 2022 Many immunologists have argued that T cells could help lower the risk of developing severe disease, or potentially even reduce mild illnesses by nipping infections in the bud. Ryan Cross, BostonGlobe.com, 7 Oct. 2022 Ninety percent of the charm of these movies is watching young love bud. Kara Warner, Peoplemag, 22 Oct. 2022
Verb
In spring, the southern Appalachian forests are flooded with light (maples, oaks, and tulip trees are just beginning to bud) and wildflowers—buttercups and purple trilliums, toothworts and mayapples, the neat white radials of great chickweed. Outside Online, 5 Nov. 2018 On one end, the neural tube started to fold around day 6, on the other a tail began to bud. Megan Molteni, STAT, 2 Aug. 2022 During the growing season, shoots will continue to bud along the trunk. oregonlive, 25 June 2022 The fuchsia magnolias begin to bud on the Champs-de-Mars.... Laura Manske, Forbes, 25 Apr. 2022 Thankfully, leaves have begun to bud and temperatures are rising. Matt Koesters, The Enquirer, 22 Apr. 2022 Lincoln bud Norman Reedus gunning hard for a shot at playing Ghost Rider in the MCU. Paul Tassi, Forbes, 15 Apr. 2022 In general, cold weather in spring delays bud break and warm weather accelerates it. Beth Botts, chicagotribune.com, 13 Mar. 2022 Many crops and plants in the Southeast have started to bud because of warmer weather until now and the freezing cold temperatures — maybe record low — that are expected on the back end of this bomb cyclone can cause some serious damage, Cohen said. CBS News, 12 Mar. 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'bud.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

Word History

Etymology

Noun

Middle English budde

First Known Use

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of bud was in the 14th century

Dictionary Entries Near bud

Cite this Entry

“Bud.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/bud. Accessed 7 Dec. 2022.

Kids Definition

bud 1 of 2

noun

1
: a small growth at the tip or on the side of a plant stem that later develops into a flower, leaf, or new shoot
2
: a flower that has not fully opened
3
: a part that grows out from the body of a plant or animal and develops into a new individual
4
: a stage in which something is not yet fully developed
trees in bud
a plan still in the bud

bud

2 of 2

verb

budded; budding
1
: to set or put forth buds
2
: to be or develop like a bud (as in freshness and promise of growth)
a budding diplomat
3
: to reproduce by the pinching off of a small part of the parent
budding yeast cells
4
: to insert a bud from one plant into an opening cut in the bark of (another plant) in order to grow a desired variety

Medical Definition

bud 1 of 2

noun

1
a
: an asexual reproductive structure
b
: a primordium having potentialities for growth and development into a definitive structure
an embryonic limb bud
a horn bud
2
: an anatomical structure (as a tactile corpuscle) resembling a bud

bud

2 of 2

intransitive verb

budded; budding
: to reproduce asexually especially by the pinching off of a small part of the parent

More from Merriam-Webster on bud

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