lifeblood

noun
life·​blood | \ ˈlīf-ˈbləd How to pronounce lifeblood (audio) , -ˌbləd \

Definition of lifeblood

1 : blood regarded as the seat of vitality
2 : a vital or life-giving force or component freedom of inquiry is the lifeblood of a university

Examples of lifeblood in a Sentence

The town's lifeblood has always been its fishing industry. The neighborhoods are the lifeblood of this city. the lifeblood that flows through his veins
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Recent Examples on the Web The lifeblood of a bookstore flows through the conversations, the debates, the discourse, the discussion of a shared love of reading. Seth Marko, San Diego Union-Tribune, "Looking back at 2020 in the arts: Seth Marko: ‘Our business has managed to weather the storm’," 27 Dec. 2020 But thriving mixed neighborhoods have been transformed into luxury ghost towns, as the lifeblood of many communities gave way to grandiose condominiums with absentee owners and chain businesses. Eric Asimov, New York Times, "How Income Inequality Has Erased Your Chance to Drink the Great Wines," 22 Oct. 2020 And fresh talent, in any era, is the lifeblood of a thriving art form. Peter Rainer, The Christian Science Monitor, "From ‘American Utopia’ to ‘Ma Rainey’: The 10 best films of 2020," 21 Dec. 2020 And it’s this right of voluntary association that is the lifeblood of true pluralism. Jay Nordlinger, National Review, "The Great American Divorce?," 21 Dec. 2020 Hares are the lifeblood of our most successful predators. John Schandelmeier, Anchorage Daily News, "Alaska’s hard-core predators don’t have it as easy as you may think," 20 Dec. 2020 The small, civic projects that are the lifeblood of fledgling practices are here dominated by the big guns, who can out-compete the smaller-fry with bigger budgets and manpower. Mark Lamster, Dallas News, "Is Dallas architecture still so bad?," 18 Dec. 2020 Subways and buses are the lifeblood of dense cities like New York. Aarian Marshall, Wired, "Mass Transit Is in Jeopardy—and So Are Cities," 14 Dec. 2020 The junior guard was the lifeblood of the Bears' offense last season and has returned with the same production. Scott Gleeson, USA TODAY, "No. 1 Baylor men's basketball takes on No. 2 Gonzaga: Everything you need to know," 6 Dec. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'lifeblood.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of lifeblood

1579, in the meaning defined at sense 1

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Time Traveler for lifeblood

Time Traveler

The first known use of lifeblood was in 1579

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Statistics for lifeblood

Last Updated

14 Jan 2021

Cite this Entry

“Lifeblood.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/lifeblood. Accessed 21 Jan. 2021.

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More Definitions for lifeblood

lifeblood

noun
How to pronounce lifeblood (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of lifeblood

: the most important part of something : the part of something that provides its strength and energy
literary : a person's blood

More from Merriam-Webster on lifeblood

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for lifeblood

Nglish: Translation of lifeblood for Spanish Speakers

Comments on lifeblood

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