bombe

noun
\ ˈbäm How to pronounce bombe (audio) , ˈbōⁿ(m)b \

Definition of bombe

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a frozen dessert usually containing ice cream and formed in layers in a mold

bombé

adjective
bom·​bé | \ (ˌ)bäm-ˈbā How to pronounce bombé (audio) , (ˌ)bōⁿ- \
variants: or bombe

Definition of bombé (Entry 2 of 2)

: having outward curving lines usually used of furniture

Examples of bombe in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Place the bombe, cake side down, on a large rimmed baking sheet. Washington Post, "A festive baked Alaska to end your night in a blaze of glory," 28 Dec. 2020 Many retailers are out of stock or back-ordered on the flexible trays that have been marketed to take advantage of the cocoa madness, beyond their original intent for candies, mousses and small bombe cakes. Washington Post, "Hot cocoa bombs are the perfect storm of viral food trends," 21 Dec. 2020 British chef Heston Blumenthal’s hot toddy bombe, sold in pretty boxes at Waitrose grocery stores in the UK, inspires the spice cake. Jeanmarie Brownson, chicagotribune.com, "Dessert classics updated: Hot toddy pudding and hazelnut cream pavlovas for Christmas," 18 Dec. 2020 To make some bathrooms' rounded bombe style vanities, Jo Anne Harris found old pieces and refinished them. Judy Rose, Detroit Free Press, "$1.6M hideaway on Lake Lapeer stuns with views of shore and nature," 8 Aug. 2020 Expect fancy pastries, too, like the beloved chocolate mousse and espresso bombe Schmutte served at Cerulean, alongside simple cookies, albeit with a twist like, maybe, ginger chocolate chip. Liz Biro, Indianapolis Star, "These are the most exciting Indianapolis restaurants opening in 2020," 31 Dec. 2019 Culprit’s boysenberry marshmallow ambrosia is one to try, as is Orphan’s Kitchen’s avocado bombe Alaska, served with lime and Kahikatea peppercorn, (a native pine). Amy Louise Bailey, Vogue, "The 7 Dishes You Have to Eat in New Zealand," 25 July 2018 While Alan Turing was organizing large-scale attacks on enigma codes using algorithms and large electromechanical devices called bombes, Elizebeth was more narrowly focused on a couple of Enigma’s systems being used by Nazi spies. National Geographic, "This Woman Saved the Americas From the Nazis," 7 Oct. 2017

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'bombe.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of bombe

Noun

1878, in the meaning defined above

Adjective

1874, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for bombe

Noun

borrowed from French, literally, "bomb" — more at bomb entry 1

Adjective

French, from bombe

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Statistics for bombe

Last Updated

14 Jan 2021

Cite this Entry

“Bombe.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/bombe. Accessed 5 Mar. 2021.

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More Definitions for bombe

bombé

Medical Definition of bombé

— see iris bombé

Comments on bombe

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