blithe

adjective
\ ˈblīth How to pronounce blithe (audio) , ˈblīt͟h How to pronounce blithe (audio) \
blither; blithest

Definition of blithe

1 : lacking due thought or consideration : casual, heedless blithe unconcern a blithe disregard for the rights of others
2 : of a happy lighthearted character or disposition a blithe spirit blithe enjoyment

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Other Words from blithe

blithely adverb

Choose the Right Synonym for blithe

merry, blithe, jocund, jovial, jolly mean showing high spirits or lightheartedness. merry suggests cheerful, joyous, uninhibited enjoyment of frolic or festivity. a merry group of revelers blithe suggests carefree, innocent, or even heedless gaiety. arrived late in his usual blithe way jocund stresses elation and exhilaration of spirits. singing, dancing, and jocund feasting jovial suggests the stimulation of conviviality and good fellowship. dinner put them in a jovial mood jolly suggests high spirits expressed in laughing, bantering, and jesting. our jolly host enlivened the party

Examples of blithe in a Sentence

He showed blithe disregard for the rights of others. He was blithe about the risks to his health.
Recent Examples on the Web The state has been built on promises of an eternal present, on blithe and deliberate disregard for the past so as not to have to learn from it—on a refusal to give a single naked whit about the future. Lauren Groff, The Atlantic, "The Dark Soul of the Sunshine State," 21 June 2020 His early entries that year are filled with blithe, gluttonous descriptions of food, plays and women. The Economist, "The lives of others Diaries written in adversity can be a source of solace," 23 May 2020 Had blithe optimism hampered the country’s ability to contain it? Tom Mctague, The Atlantic, "The Risks of Boris Johnson’s Relentless Optimism," 27 Apr. 2020 Sixties hippyish ideals and '70s loose silhouettes (not to mention disco fever) embraced bralessness, suggesting a blithe, undone glamour that was epitomized by the likes of Jane Birkin, Bianca Jagger, and Marisa Berenson. Rosalind Jana, refinery29.com, "The Nipple’s Place In Fashion History," 14 May 2020 By their blithe cost-benefit analyses that imply that our older people might be acceptable sacrifices at the altar of economic revival. Los Angeles Times, "Older does not equal expendable. We need to act in a way that protects our elders from coronavirus," 9 May 2020 Swinney’s comments drew a good bit of blowback for being too blithe at a time of deep uncertainty about the future and also unhelpful given that the governor of South Carolina, to that point, still hadn’t issued a statewide stay-at-home order. Dan Wolken, USA TODAY, "Opinion: College football fans seek comfort in familiar voice, Paul Finebaum," 7 Apr. 2020 Listeners sent in stories of unpaid overtime, blithe bosses, and having to cover writers’ lunch bills. John August, The Hollywood Reporter, "How Hollywood Can Step Up Now to Help Support Staff (Guest Column)," 27 Mar. 2020 Some slip from blithe whimsy into abject, desperate anxiety (Amy Hargreaves presenting a fantasy job application to be a worldwide secret agent, from a script by Shara Feit). Ben Brantley, New York Times, "In ‘Viral Monologues,’ Theater Mutates Into Online Deliverance," 20 Mar. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'blithe.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of blithe

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 2

History and Etymology for blithe

Middle English, from Old English blīthe; akin to Old High German blīdi joyous

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Time Traveler for blithe

Time Traveler

The first known use of blithe was before the 12th century

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Statistics for blithe

Last Updated

28 Jun 2020

Cite this Entry

“Blithe.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/blithe. Accessed 15 Aug. 2020.

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More Definitions for blithe

blithe

adjective
How to pronounce blithe (audio) How to pronounce blithe (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of blithe

: showing a lack of proper thought or care : not caring or worrying
literary : happy and without worry

blithe

adjective
\ ˈblīth How to pronounce blithe (audio) , ˈblīt͟h \
blither; blithest

Kids Definition of blithe

: free from worry : merry, cheerful She let out a quick, blithe laugh.— Kevin Henkes, Olive's Ocean

Other Words from blithe

blithely adverb

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More from Merriam-Webster on blithe

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for blithe

Spanish Central: Translation of blithe

Nglish: Translation of blithe for Spanish Speakers

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