bleed

verb
\ ˈblēd How to pronounce bleed (audio) \
bled\ ˈbled How to pronounce bleed (audio) \; bleeding

Definition of bleed

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

1a : to emit or lose blood
b : to sacrifice one's blood especially in battle
2 : to feel anguish, pain, or sympathy a heart that bleeds at a friend's misfortune
3a : to escape by oozing or flowing (as from a wound)
b : to spread into or through something gradually : seep foreign policy bleeds into economic policy— J. B. Judis
4 : to give up some constituent (such as sap or dye) by exuding or diffusing it
5a : to pay out or give money
b : to have money extorted
6 : to be printed so as to run off one or more edges of the page after trimming

transitive verb

1 : to remove or draw blood from
2 : to get or extort money from especially over a prolonged period
3 : to draw sap from (a tree)
4a : to extract or let out some or all of a contained substance from bleed a brake line
b : to extract or cause to escape from a container
c : to diminish gradually usually used with offa pilot bleeding off airspeed
d : to lose rapidly and uncontrollably the company was bleeding money
e : sap cost overruns … bleed other programs— Alex Roland
5 : to cause (something, such as a printed illustration) to bleed
bleed white
: to drain of blood or resources

bleed

noun

Definition of bleed (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : printed matter (such as an illustration) that bleeds also : the part of a bleed trimmed off
2 : the escape of blood from vessels : hemorrhage

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Examples of bleed in a Sentence

Verb She was bleeding from the face and hands. Doctors used to bleed their patients in an effort to cure them. We bled air from the tank. You'll need to bleed the car's brake lines.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Many people are stuck at home for most of their waking hours, watching one day bleed into the next. Jamie Ducharme, Time, "Why the COVID-19 Pandemic Has Caused a Widespread Existential Crisis," 29 Dec. 2020 Colbie suffered a bilateral brain bleed several days after her birth, which led to her cerebral palsy. Rachel Desantis, PEOPLE.com, "Toddler with Cerebral Palsy Who Doctors Feared Wouldn't Walk Uses Walker Alongside Great-Grandma," 21 Dec. 2020 This maneuver is critical for a Starship returning from orbit, both to bleed off velocity as well as ensure its reusability without a massive heat shield. Eric Berger, Ars Technica, "So, it turns out SpaceX is pretty good at rocketing," 10 Dec. 2020 The authors concluded that more work is needed to evaluate this approach across a range of different brain bleed characteristics. Carolyn Barber, Scientific American, "An Emerging Tool for COVID Times: The Portable MRI," 12 Nov. 2020 County election officials maintained that although the marks could bleed through, the ballot was designed with that in mind. Ronald J. Hansen, The Arizona Republic, "As Arizona vote count continues, Rep. Paul Gosar, GOP Chair Kelli Ward take lead in sowing doubt," 6 Nov. 2020 Across the country, places like Floyd County — which boasts one stoplight and fewer than 16,000 residents — have seen their community papers bleed staff, get gobbled up by large corporations or close down altogether. Washington Post, "This journalist was her paper’s only full-time reporter — until they fired her. Her small town wonders: Now what?," 23 Oct. 2020 Inside the two-minute warning, the Eagles were up 10 and apparently were content to bleed out the clock to halftime. Amie Just | Staff Writer, NOLA.com, "The Saints were flat, and it was costly; here's what happened in a Week 14 loss to Eagles," 13 Dec. 2020 Less than 24 hours after the franchise savior was carted off for the season, Bengal Land continued to bleed emotionally. Mike Bass, The Enquirer, "Column: Fans sound off on Joe Burrow's injury, being a Cincinnati Bengals fan," 27 Nov. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The numbers highlight how Covid-19 has spawned other public health emergencies, as the social effects and officials’ failures to grapple with the pandemic bleed into every part of American life. Aarian Marshall, Wired, "The Year of Driving Less—but More Dangerously," 24 Dec. 2020 Still, the clear motivation is to help stanch the cash bleed. Dominic Gates, chicagotribune.com, "Boeing saves cash by giving 82,000 workers stock, not pay raises," 17 Dec. 2020 The photographs run full bleed to the pages' edges as if the beauty seen in each image is too bold to be contained by any book. Donny Bajohr, Smithsonian Magazine, "The Ten Best Photography Books of 2020," 11 Dec. 2020 But in 2019, cold-cereal sales flattened, giving leaders at General Mills hope that the slow bleed was over. Kristen Leigh Painter, Star Tribune, "Minnesota food companies rejoice: Cereal's not just for breakfast anymore," 14 Nov. 2020 Second lady Karen Pence, who will visit Tipp City. Suburbia: The Republican bleed of suburban women is fairly apparent at this point, and that includes Ohio, the New York Times' Lisa Lerer writes. cleveland, "As coronavirus surge continues, Ohio posts record number of hospitalizations: Capitol Letter," 20 Oct. 2020 Two weeks earlier he was released from hospital, and straight into an alcohol-recovery clinic, following surgery for a bleed on his brain. NBC News, "Diego Maradona: Why Argentine soccer legend was loved like no other," 26 Nov. 2020 In Kentucky, Zach Vorbrink, a North Bullitt High School senior, suffered a head injury that resulted in a brain bleed and subsequent surgery. Lisa Kearns, STAT, "Add Covid-related myocarditis, mechanical ventilation, and death to this year’s football risks," 26 Nov. 2020 In addition to the brain bleed, the report states, Davena had a lacerated liver and damage to her lips. Carol Robinson | Crobinson@al.com, al, "Wrongful death suit filed in ‘heartbreaking’ abuse of 19-month-old Tuscaloosa County girl," 17 Nov. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'bleed.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of bleed

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1a

Noun

1917, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for bleed

Verb

Middle English bleden, from Old English blēdan, from blōd blood

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Time Traveler for bleed

Time Traveler

The first known use of bleed was before the 12th century

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Statistics for bleed

Last Updated

19 Jan 2021

Cite this Entry

“Bleed.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/bleed. Accessed 20 Jan. 2021.

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More Definitions for bleed

bleed

verb
How to pronounce bleed (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of bleed

: to lose or release blood because of a cut, injury, etc.
: to remove blood from (a person) as part of a medical procedure that was done in past times
: to remove air or liquid from something

bleed

verb
\ ˈblēd How to pronounce bleed (audio) \
bled\ ˈbled \; bleeding

Kids Definition of bleed

1 : to lose or shed blood A cut finger bleeds.
2 : to feel pain or pity My heart bleeds for the victims of the fire.
3 : to draw a liquid or gas from bleed a tire
4 : to spread into something else colors bleeding

bleed

verb
\ ˈblēd How to pronounce bleed (audio) \
bled\ ˈbled How to pronounce bleed (audio) \; bleeding

Medical Definition of bleed

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to emit or lose blood hemophiliacs often bleed severely from the slightest scratch
2 : to escape by oozing or flowing (as from a wound)

transitive verb

: to remove or draw blood from

bleed

noun

Medical Definition of bleed (Entry 2 of 2)

: the escape of blood from vessels : hemorrhage a massive gastrointestinal bleed

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Comments on bleed

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