barge

noun
\ ˈbärj How to pronounce barge (audio) \

Definition of barge

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: any of various boats: such as
a : a roomy usually flat-bottomed boat used chiefly for the transport of goods on inland waterways and usually propelled by towing
b : a large motorboat supplied to the flag officer of a flagship
c : a roomy pleasure boat especially : a boat of state elegantly furnished and decorated

barge

verb
barged; barging

Definition of barge (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to carry by barge

intransitive verb

1 : to move ponderously or clumsily
2 : to thrust oneself heedlessly or unceremoniously barged into the meeting

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Synonyms & Antonyms for barge

Synonyms: Verb

Antonyms: Verb

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Examples of barge in a Sentence

Verb He came rushing down the stairs, barging into the crowd of people at the bottom. She barged through the door without even knocking.
Recent Examples on the Web: Noun According to the report, North Korea used barges to export millions of tons of commodities like coal -- via ship-to-ship transfers to Chinese vessels -- to earn money for its weapons programs. Richard Roth, CNN, "Once again, North Korea is accused of enhancing its nuclear and missile programs despite UN sanctions," 11 Feb. 2020 This time around they’re using barges to bring in the more stable sand. Washington Post, "BP oil spill cash rebuilds eroded Louisiana pelican island," 3 Feb. 2020 On Sunday, December 22, 2019, a barge holding 600 gallons of diesel fuel overturned after being struck by a crane and descended into the waters off the coast of San Cristóbal Island, one of the 19 Galápagos Islands off the coast of Ecuador. Popular Science, "Even with international protections, the Galápagos Islands are becoming more vulnerable to humans," 21 Jan. 2020 At least seven barges are doing the same thing on this stretch of the Red River, about an hour’s drive from Hanoi, the capital of Vietnam. The Economist, "Bring me a nightmare Asia’s hunger for sand is harmful to farming and the environment," 18 Jan. 2020 At the port, barges would bring material to and from tankers anchored in Kamishak Bay, which has a series of reefs and shallows. Acacia Johnson, National Geographic, "The risky plan to haul minerals from a mine in the Alaska wilderness," 14 Jan. 2020 The 212-foot-long core that also includes the rocket’s avionics (electronics) will travel from Michoud via barge to NASA’s nearby Stennis Space Center in Mississippi for live engine testing later this year. Lee Roop | Lroop@al.com, al, "How big is NASA’s Space Launch System? Check these new images," 2 Jan. 2020 USA TODAY Crews were working Monday to assess the impact of an oil spill off one of the Galápagos Islands after a barge carrying 600 gallons of diesel fuel sank, Ecuadoran officials say. Ryan W. Miller, USA TODAY, "Barge carrying 600 gallons of diesel sinks off Galápagos Island, prompting emergency," 23 Dec. 2019 Russia’s new floating power plant, the entire barge-like ship holding the reactors, is just 3 to 5 percent of the total volume of one large cooling tower on land. Caroline Delbert, Popular Mechanics, "A Brief History of Tiny Nuclear Reactors," 16 Dec. 2019 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb The lighting was held less than 24 hours after a knife-wielding man barged into a home where members of an Orthodox Jewish community were celebrating Hanukkah. BostonGlobe.com, "NEEDHAM — A crowd gathered outside the Chabad Jewish Center just after sunset Sunday to light a menorah in support of the victims of an attack the day before on a rabbi’s home in Monsey, N.Y.," 31 Dec. 2019 Authorities believe Dear first shot at people near his truck, then shot people in front of the clinic, then barged inside and continued shooting. Shelly Bradbury, The Denver Post, "Admitted Planned Parenthood killer Robert Dear indicted by federal grand jury in 2015 rampage," 9 Dec. 2019 When the turn-of-the-century Clifton Guest and Fishing Lodge was slated for demolition, Vitale bought and barged it down the St. Lucie River to its current spot on Seminole Street. Nancy Moreland, chicagotribune.com, "Old Florida is alive and well in sunny Stuart, where the past won’t be forgotten," 29 Oct. 2019 Constantine plans to truck copper and zinc concentrates to the Haines port, where the material would be barged about 15 miles to the deepwater ore terminal in nearby Skagway, which is owned by the Alaska Industrial Development and Export Authority. Author: Elwood Brehmer, Anchorage Daily News, "Southeast Alaska metals prospect has major potential, developers say," 14 June 2019 The chief barged into the police interrogation room where the man, handcuffed to the floor, called him a pervert. New York Times, "Scandal Began With Sex Toys. Now Ex-D.A. Is Convicted on Long Island.," 17 Dec. 2019 He's already barged into the campaign, slamming Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn and buddying up with Brexit Party boss Nigel Farage — a constant thorn in Johnson's right side. Stephen Collinson, CNN, "The most powerful destabilizing force facing NATO today," 3 Dec. 2019 Republicans barged en masse into a secure hearing-room to highlight their objection to holding hearings behind closed doors, though that has long been a mainstay of congressional oversight. The Economist, "The Ukraine affair The new politics of Donald Trump’s impeachment," 10 Nov. 2019 According to reports, gunmen first barged into an apartment two doors down from Herring’s and held a woman and her 10-year-old child at gunpoint. oregonlive, "Portland man sentenced for his role in gang shooting that killed a pregnant woman," 12 Oct. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'barge.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of barge

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined above

Verb

1649, in the meaning defined at transitive sense

History and Etymology for barge

Noun

Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin barca

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Time Traveler for barge

Time Traveler

The first known use of barge was in the 13th century

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Statistics for barge

Last Updated

15 Feb 2020

Cite this Entry

“Barge.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/barge. Accessed 26 Feb. 2020.

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More Definitions for barge

barge

noun
How to pronounce barge (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of barge

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a large boat that has a flat bottom and that is used to carry goods in harbors and on rivers and canals

barge

verb

English Language Learners Definition of barge (Entry 2 of 2)

: to move or push in a fast, awkward, and often rude way

barge

noun
\ ˈbärj How to pronounce barge (audio) \

Kids Definition of barge

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a broad boat with a flat bottom used chiefly in harbors and on rivers and canals

barge

verb
barged; barging

Kids Definition of barge (Entry 2 of 2)

: to move or push in a fast and often rude way He barged through the crowd.

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More from Merriam-Webster on barge

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for barge

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with barge

Spanish Central: Translation of barge

Nglish: Translation of barge for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of barge for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about barge

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