articulate

adjective
ar·​tic·​u·​late | \ är-ˈti-kyə-lət How to pronounce articulate (audio) \

Definition of articulate

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : expressing oneself readily, clearly, and effectively an articulate teacher also : expressed in such a manner an articulate argument
b : divided into syllables or words meaningfully arranged : intelligible an articulate cry/utterance
c : able to speak So furious was he that he was hardly articulate— Arthur Conan Doyle
2a : consisting of segments united by joints : jointed articulate animals
b : distinctly marked off an articulate period in history

articulate

verb
ar·​tic·​u·​late | \ är-ˈti-kyə-ˌlāt How to pronounce articulate (audio) \
articulated; articulating

Definition of articulate (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to give clear and effective utterance to : to put into words articulate one's grievances He found it hard to articulate his feelings.
b : to utter distinctly articulating each note in the musical phrase
c : to give definition to (something, such as a shape or object) Eight shades of gray were chosen to articulate different spaces.— Carol Vogel
d : to give shape or expression to (something, such as a theme or concept) a drama that uses eerie props to articulate a sense of foreboding
2a : to unite by or as if by means of a joint : joint
b : to form or fit into a systematic whole articulating a program for all school grades

intransitive verb

1 : to utter clear and understandable sounds
2 : to become united or connected by or as if by a joint Most bones articulate with other bones in one or more places.

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Other Words from articulate

Adjective

articulately adverb
articulateness noun

Verb

articulative \ är-​ˈti-​kyə-​lə-​tiv How to pronounce articulative (audio) , -​ˌlā-​ \ adjective
articulator \ är-​ˈti-​kyə-​ˌlā-​tər How to pronounce articulator (audio) \ noun

Synonyms & Antonyms for articulate

Synonyms: Adjective

Synonyms: Verb

Antonyms: Adjective

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Examples of articulate in a Sentence

Adjective But he clearly adored his quick-witted and mercilessly articulate elder daughter. Contrary to feminist accounts of her patriarchal imprisonment, Emily Dickinson's objections to her father's strictures had an affectionate tone … — Christopher Benfey, New York Review of Books, 17 Jan. 2002 The engaging and articulate Bol makes campers realize how fortunate they are to have the freedoms enjoyed in America, and he emphasizes the importance of capitalizing on their opportunities to get the most out of life. — Chris Broussard, New York Times, 4 Aug. 2002 Among the most articulate critics of the tests are the boycotting students, who complain about narrowing opportunities and shrinking curricula. — Peter Schrag, Atlantic, August 2000 She's an intelligent and articulate speaker. He was very articulate about his feelings on the subject. The baby is beginning to form articulate words and phrases. Verb She was shocked, she told me, to see that he insisted on talking about her ideas—and about the pains and hopes that gave rise to them. "The only way to keep it is to give it away," he told her, articulating and enacting the essence of altruism. — Joshua Wolf Shenk, Atlantic, June 2009 "Fiction just doesn't interest me," one 41-year-old construction worker told CNN. "If I'm going to get a story, I'll get a movie," he said, articulating an attitude surely shared by many others in our media-saturated world. — Sara Nelson, Publishers Weekly, 27 Aug. 2007 Erudite, elderly, and introspective, one of my patients articulates clearly some of today's dilemmas facing both alcoholic patients and their physicians. — Thomas L. Delbanco, Journal of the American Medical Association, 13 Mar. 1996 He had some trouble articulating his thoughts. We disagree with the views articulated by the administration. a theory first articulated by ancient philosophers the bones that articulate with the clavicle
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Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective Is there an articulate person among the group who are upset with the way things are going that could step up to a microphone and speak for all the people? Mike Brest, Washington Examiner, "Republican lawmaker wonders if any George Floyd protester is 'articulate'," 4 June 2020 Not just ending the humane treatment of young undocumented immigrants under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals policy, but ignoring Congress’s requirements that any administration articulate rational reasons for policy changes. Washington Post, "The Democrats Are Moving Left. Will America Follow?," 12 Nov. 2019 And yet one of the most welcome surprises of this articulate, even-handed film is its openness toward mutual understanding, a path to which both Goodes and Grant have made significant contributions. David Rooney, The Hollywood Reporter, "'The Australian Dream': Film Review | Telluride 2019," 30 Aug. 2019 At once amiable and articulate, the conductor made the music approachable. Jonathan Rosenberg, WSJ, "Five Best: Jonathan Rosenberg on Music, Politics and Society," 7 Feb. 2020 The conductor Louis Langrée draws a lithe, articulate and elegant performance from the Mostly Mozart Festival Orchestra. New York Times, "Review: In ‘The Magic Flute,’ Mozart Meets Nosferatu," 18 July 2019 Pop, born James Osterberg, is an articulate, serious, and seriously busy multifaceted artist, one whose music —both solo and with his infamous band the Stooges — now shines in contemporary movies and ads. Katherine Turman, EW.com, "Iggy Pop on his legacy and receiving a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award: 'I was surprised'," 24 Jan. 2020 And several years sober, Isbell’s voice hasn’t sounded more articulate, stronger or heartfelt. Matt Wake | Mwake@al.com, al, "Here’s what a concert at VBC’s new music hall is like," 7 Jan. 2020 Buckley seemed an ideal alternative: an articulate, prominent sociopolitical critic who eschewed the racist epithets of conservativism’s more vocal white supremacists but who nonetheless supported segregation. Gabrielle Bellot, The Atlantic, "The Famous Baldwin-Buckley Debate Still Matters Today," 2 Dec. 2019 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Nowadays Arab rappers challenge conservative mores and articulate the fury of disenfranchised, jobless youths. The Economist, "Rap the casbah As Arab rappers challenge the old ways, despots hit back," 4 July 2020 The findings underscore the imperative for Biden to articulate a clear agenda for the country and to generate more enthusiasm among key Democratic groups, including young people. Susan Page, USA TODAY, "Exclusive USA TODAY poll: Biden widens his lead, but Trump keeps the edge on enthusiasm," 30 June 2020 Airlines will clearly articulate the rules to passengers before flying and flight crews will reiterate the rules once on board, including the consequences passengers could face for violating the policy. Caitlin O'kane, CBS News, "Airlines threaten to ban travelers who refuse to wear face masks," 16 June 2020 In most group therapy settings, patients are advised not to touch one another and instead encouraged to articulate their feelings and desires aloud to the room, with the aim of processing emotions through words. Amy Wallace, The Atlantic, "The Curious Comforts of a YouTube Show About Group Therapy," 11 June 2020 And then there are the artists, who use their creativity to articulate the range of feelings at the very heart of the movement. Ineye Komonibo, refinery29.com, "These Artists Are Using Art As Protest For Black Lives Matter," 9 June 2020 Within a decade, it was widely thought to be more convenient to dissolve the empire than to articulate a strategy for incorporating foreigners within it. Douglas Boin, Time, "Ancient Rome Thrived When the Empire Welcomed Immigrants. We Should Remember What Happened When That Changed," 9 June 2020 Slowed by the effects of Parkinson’s disease, Jackson leaned on his son Sunday to articulate specific policy recommendations for Louisville. Alfred Miller, The Courier-Journal, "Jesse Jackson reiterates call for Rand Paul to end opposition to anti-lynching bill," 7 June 2020 Minutes after that, a squadron of bicycle cops, wearing black articulated body armor, descended on a couple remaining cyclists who had not yet departed. Emily Witt, The New Yorker, "Protesting Past Curfew in New York City," 4 June 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'articulate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of articulate

Adjective

1531, in the meaning defined at sense 1b

Verb

1661, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

History and Etymology for articulate

Adjective and Verb

Latin articulatus jointed, past participle of articulare, from articulus — see article entry 1

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Time Traveler for articulate

Time Traveler

The first known use of articulate was in 1531

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Statistics for articulate

Last Updated

25 Jun 2020

Cite this Entry

“Articulate.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/articulate. Accessed 8 Jul. 2020.

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More Definitions for articulate

articulate

adjective
How to pronounce articulate (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of articulate

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: able to express ideas clearly and effectively in speech or writing
: clearly expressed and easily understood

articulate

verb
How to pronounce articulate (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of articulate (Entry 2 of 2)

: to express (something, such as an idea) in words
: to say or pronounce (something, such as a word) in a way that can be clearly heard and understood
technical : to connect with a joint or something that is like a joint

articulate

adjective
ar·​tic·​u·​late | \ är-ˈti-kyə-lət How to pronounce articulate (audio) \

Kids Definition of articulate

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : clearly understandable an articulate essay
2 : able to express oneself clearly and well an articulate speaker

Other Words from articulate

articulately adverb

articulate

verb
ar·​tic·​u·​late | \ är-ˈti-kyə-ˌlāt How to pronounce articulate (audio) \
articulated; articulating

Kids Definition of articulate (Entry 2 of 2)

: to speak or pronounce clearly Be sure to articulate your words.

articulate

adjective
ar·​tic·​u·​late | \ är-ˈtik-yə-lət How to pronounce articulate (audio) \

Medical Definition of articulate

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: consisting of segments united by joints : jointed articulate animals

articulate

verb
ar·​tic·​u·​late | \ -ˌlāt How to pronounce articulate (audio) \
articulated; articulating

Medical Definition of articulate (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to utter distinctly
2 : to unite by means of a joint
3 : to arrange (artificial teeth) on an articulator

intransitive verb

1 : to utter articulate sounds
2 : to become united or connected by or as if by a joint bones that articulate with each other

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Comments on articulate

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