articulate

adjective
ar·​tic·​u·​late | \ är-ˈti-kyə-lət How to pronounce articulate (audio) \

Definition of articulate

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : expressing oneself readily, clearly, and effectively an articulate teacher also : expressed in such a manner an articulate argument
b : divided into syllables or words meaningfully arranged : intelligible an articulate cry/utterance
c : able to speak So furious was he that he was hardly articulate— Arthur Conan Doyle
2a : consisting of segments united by joints : jointed articulate animals
b : distinctly marked off an articulate period in history

articulate

verb
ar·​tic·​u·​late | \ är-ˈti-kyə-ˌlāt How to pronounce articulate (audio) \
articulated; articulating

Definition of articulate (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to give clear and effective utterance to : to put into words articulate one's grievances He found it hard to articulate his feelings.
b : to utter distinctly articulating each note in the musical phrase
c : to give definition to (something, such as a shape or object) Eight shades of gray were chosen to articulate different spaces.— Carol Vogel
d : to give shape or expression to (something, such as a theme or concept) a drama that uses eerie props to articulate a sense of foreboding
2a : to unite by or as if by means of a joint : joint
b : to form or fit into a systematic whole articulating a program for all school grades

intransitive verb

1 : to utter clear and understandable sounds
2 : to become united or connected by or as if by a joint Most bones articulate with other bones in one or more places.

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Other Words from articulate

Adjective

articulately adverb
articulateness noun

Verb

articulative \ är-​ˈti-​kyə-​lə-​tiv How to pronounce articulate (audio) , -​ˌlā-​ \ adjective
articulator \ är-​ˈti-​kyə-​ˌlā-​tər How to pronounce articulate (audio) \ noun

Synonyms & Antonyms for articulate

Synonyms: Adjective

Synonyms: Verb

Antonyms: Adjective

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Examples of articulate in a Sentence

Adjective But he clearly adored his quick-witted and mercilessly articulate elder daughter. Contrary to feminist accounts of her patriarchal imprisonment, Emily Dickinson's objections to her father's strictures had an affectionate tone … — Christopher Benfey, New York Review of Books, 17 Jan. 2002 The engaging and articulate Bol makes campers realize how fortunate they are to have the freedoms enjoyed in America, and he emphasizes the importance of capitalizing on their opportunities to get the most out of life. — Chris Broussard, New York Times, 4 Aug. 2002 Among the most articulate critics of the tests are the boycotting students, who complain about narrowing opportunities and shrinking curricula. — Peter Schrag, Atlantic, August 2000 She's an intelligent and articulate speaker. He was very articulate about his feelings on the subject. The baby is beginning to form articulate words and phrases. Verb She was shocked, she told me, to see that he insisted on talking about her ideas—and about the pains and hopes that gave rise to them. "The only way to keep it is to give it away," he told her, articulating and enacting the essence of altruism. — Joshua Wolf Shenk, Atlantic, June 2009 "Fiction just doesn't interest me," one 41-year-old construction worker told CNN. "If I'm going to get a story, I'll get a movie," he said, articulating an attitude surely shared by many others in our media-saturated world. — Sara Nelson, Publishers Weekly, 27 Aug. 2007 Erudite, elderly, and introspective, one of my patients articulates clearly some of today's dilemmas facing both alcoholic patients and their physicians. — Thomas L. Delbanco, Journal of the American Medical Association, 13 Mar. 1996 He had some trouble articulating his thoughts. We disagree with the views articulated by the administration. a theory first articulated by ancient philosophers the bones that articulate with the clavicle
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Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective Many of us are encouraged by the corrective actions of theaters who have developed articulate maps to social justice. San Diego Union-Tribune, "Theater’s day of reckoning: Kimberly King: ‘Well, here we are again, but this time feels different’," 20 Mar. 2021 Presales professionals play a key role in helping both account executives articulate value and buyers assess and map which technologies can meet their operational and business needs. Freddy Jose Mangum, Forbes, "Why Technology Businesses Should Focus On Presales In The Digital Economy," 18 Mar. 2021 In the years since the crime, Weier was described in court as articulate, mature and remorseful. Christopher Kuhagen, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "The release of a woman in the Slender Man stabbing is on hold as the state and defense respond to doctor's reports," 10 Mar. 2021 An articulate Rhys Greene plays Malcolm X as a man who is haunted, dispirited and exhausted, but no less committed to his ideals for non-passive protest. Pam Kragen, San Diego Union-Tribune, "Review: Stellar performances lift Point Loma Playhouse’s ‘The Meeting’," 2 Mar. 2021 This event has provoked a fair amount of introspection among the audio community, some of whom are working to publicly articulate paths forward. Nicholas Quah, Vulture, "Key Podcast Takeaways from Spotify’s Big Event," 23 Feb. 2021 Joe Serio: Roy was a very personable, articulate, affable guy. Tracy Smith, CBS News, "Federal judge whose son was killed in ambush: "My son's death cannot be in vain"," 20 Feb. 2021 Ted is a window into the conservative’s soul for those who are not conservative, and an articulate advocate for those who are. cleveland, "In defense of Ted Diadiun -- I regularly disagree with him, but isn’t that the point? Letter from the Editor," 23 Jan. 2021 Amy Klobuchar and First Avenue owner Dayna Frank, who became a passionate, articulate and impactful lobbyist as president of the National Independent Venue Association. Star Tribune, "6 cool things in music this week include Bruce Springsteen, #SaveOurStages, Iggy Pop and First Avenue," 25 Dec. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Shepherd leaders motivate, promulgate, accelerate and articulate penetrating insights that docent opportunity. Peter Weedfald, Forbes, "Are You A Shepherd Leader?," 11 Mar. 2021 Too many expository lines articulate sentiments that are already apparent in the performances. Judy Berman, Time, "Genius: Aretha Is a Lavish, Lively Showstopper That Hits a Few False Notes," 19 Mar. 2021 But Biden’s critics have struggled to articulate what, exactly, the public is missing. Alex Shephard, The New Republic, "Joe Biden Hasn’t Held a Press Conference. Who Cares?," 16 Mar. 2021 To make their strategies clear, organisations should not only articulate the strategy choices made but also clarify the alternatives rejected in favour of focusing limited attention and resources. London Business School, Forbes, "Leading From Afar: Giving Autonomy Without Losing Control," 12 Mar. 2021 To rise above the pack, forward-looking leaders must articulate a perspective on what makes their business unique and different from competitors. Tom Deegan, Fortune, "Inside the Future 50: The 3 key traits of companies that outperform, regardless of industry," 23 Feb. 2021 Practically speaking, the refusal to articulate concrete positions spared the Party the embarrassment of watching the President contradict them. Jelani Cobb, The New Yorker, "What Is Happening to the Republicans?," 8 Mar. 2021 Since each reservation's biome differs, StarLife will first help communities articulate their needs and provide an à la carte menu of services to help systemize their environment. Danielle Bernabe, Fortune, "How Clubhouse is engaging with Native American communities," 6 Mar. 2021 Write job descriptions that clearly articulate key qualities and attributes for the role and use standardized scorecards to evaluate candidates. Paul Spiegelman, Forbes, "Is Hiring For Culture Fit Perpetuating Bias?," 1 Mar. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'articulate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of articulate

Adjective

1531, in the meaning defined at sense 1b

Verb

1661, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

History and Etymology for articulate

Adjective

borrowed from Late Latin articulātus "uttered distinctly, expressed clearly" (as translation of Greek énarthros), past participle of articulāre "to make distinct sounds," going back to Latin, "to divide into distinct parts," derivative of articulus "joint, part of a limb or digit between joints, point of time, clause of a document" — more at article entry 1

Verb

borrowed from Late Latin articulātus, past participle of articulāre "to make distinct sounds," going back to Latin, "to divide into distinct parts" — more at articulate entry 1

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Time Traveler for articulate

Time Traveler

The first known use of articulate was in 1531

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Statistics for articulate

Last Updated

3 Apr 2021

Cite this Entry

“Articulate.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/articulate. Accessed 14 Apr. 2021.

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More Definitions for articulate

articulate

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of articulate

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: able to express ideas clearly and effectively in speech or writing
: clearly expressed and easily understood

articulate

verb

English Language Learners Definition of articulate (Entry 2 of 2)

: to express (something, such as an idea) in words
: to say or pronounce (something, such as a word) in a way that can be clearly heard and understood
technical : to connect with a joint or something that is like a joint

articulate

adjective
ar·​tic·​u·​late | \ är-ˈti-kyə-lət How to pronounce articulate (audio) \

Kids Definition of articulate

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : clearly understandable an articulate essay
2 : able to express oneself clearly and well an articulate speaker

Other Words from articulate

articulately adverb

articulate

verb
ar·​tic·​u·​late | \ är-ˈti-kyə-ˌlāt How to pronounce articulate (audio) \
articulated; articulating

Kids Definition of articulate (Entry 2 of 2)

: to speak or pronounce clearly Be sure to articulate your words.

articulate

adjective
ar·​tic·​u·​late | \ är-ˈtik-yə-lət How to pronounce articulate (audio) \

Medical Definition of articulate

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: consisting of segments united by joints : jointed articulate animals

articulate

verb
ar·​tic·​u·​late | \ -ˌlāt How to pronounce articulate (audio) \
articulated; articulating

Medical Definition of articulate (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to utter distinctly
2 : to unite by means of a joint
3 : to arrange (artificial teeth) on an articulator

intransitive verb

1 : to utter articulate sounds
2 : to become united or connected by or as if by a joint bones that articulate with each other

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Comments on articulate

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