animosity

noun
an·​i·​mos·​i·​ty | \ ˌa-nə-ˈmä-sə-tē \
plural animosities

Definition of animosity

: a strong feeling of dislike or hatred : ill will or resentment tending toward active hostility : an antagonistic attitude

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Choose the Right Synonym for animosity

enmity, hostility, antipathy, antagonism, animosity, rancor, animus mean deep-seated dislike or ill will. enmity suggests positive hatred which may be open or concealed. an unspoken enmity hostility suggests an enmity showing itself in attacks or aggression. hostility between the two nations antipathy and antagonism imply a natural or logical basis for one's hatred or dislike, antipathy suggesting repugnance, a desire to avoid or reject, and antagonism suggesting a clash of temperaments leading readily to hostility. a natural antipathy for self-seekers antagonism between the brothers animosity suggests intense ill will and vindictiveness that threaten to kindle hostility. animosity that led to revenge rancor is especially applied to bitter brooding over a wrong. rancor filled every line of his letters animus adds to animosity the implication of strong prejudice. objections devoid of personal animus

Where does the word animosity come from?

The important Latin word animus (very closely related to anima) could mean a great many things having to do with the soul and the emotions, one of them being "anger". As an English word, animus has generally meant "ill will", so it isn't mysterious that animosity means basically the same thing. Animosity can exist between two people, two groups or organizations, or two countries, and can sometimes lie hidden for years before reappearing. The deep animosities that exist between certain ethnic and religious groups sometimes seem as if they will last forever.

Examples of animosity in a Sentence

Few rivalries can match that of the Cards and Cubs in terms of history, color and animosity. Things are tense in an off year, but in 2003 the teams are at the top of the National League Central division (along with the Houston Astros), separated by a half-game. — John Grisham, New York Times Book Review, 1 May 2005 As I get older, I have noticed the troubles many of my friends have with their fathers: the animosities and disappointments, held so long in the arrears of late adolescence, suddenly coming up due on both ends. But my father and I, if anything, have gotten closer, even as I understand him less and less. — Tom Bissell, Harper's, December 2004 What I did not anticipate, however, was the depth of animosity that had been simmering among the teachers beneath the pleasantries that characterized our public, formal encounters. I discovered that my enthusiastic advocacy for whole language was received by traditional teachers as demeaning, insulting attacks. — Elaine Garan, Language Arts, September 1998 We put aside our personal animosities so that we could work together. his open animosity towards us made our meeting very uncomfortable
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Recent Examples on the Web

In short, before spreading animosity into the world, be mindful that people do read comments — the good and the bad ones. Sara Delgado, Teen Vogue, "Ariana Grande Fans Are Spamming Pete Davidson's Instagram With "Thank U, Next" Comments," 29 Nov. 2018 Here, even over five years later, that bubbling animosity is still present. Liana Satenstein, Vogue, "Meet Gerilyn, Tbilisi’s Queen of Drag," 21 Nov. 2018 Randy Dunn is out as president of Southern Illinois University, bookending a wild stretch of controversy and animosity at the two-campus system, the university announced late Friday. Dawn Rhodes, chicagotribune.com, "Southern Illinois University president ousted amid swirling controversy," 13 July 2018 Criticism in the press and animosity from environmental groups are likely not enough to derail Pruitt's political career, said Oklahoma GOP consultant Trebor Worthen. CBS News, "What's next for Scott Pruitt?," 6 July 2018 The increased coverage of Meghan's father Thomas Markle Sr., and his numerous comments to the British tabloid papers and morning shows could well have amplified Harry's animosity toward the press. Caroline Hallemann, Town & Country, "Prince Harry Thinks There's "Too Much Hysteria" Over Meghan Markle," 5 Aug. 2018 The study also suggests that the animosity prompted by dehumanizing language is momentary; propaganda needs to be repeated regularly or its effects dissipate. Aliza Luft, Washington Post, "How dangerous is it when Trump calls some immigrants ‘animals’?," 25 May 2018 Ending a period of animosity over North Korea's nuclear and missile development, Trump made history by meeting North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in Singapore in June. Fox News, "South Korea urges more US-North Korea talks, despite Pompeo's canceled trip," 25 Aug. 2018 For whatever reason, customers who call sometimes exhibit a great deal of animosity. Sonia Rao, chicagotribune.com, "'What's up with that white voice?': The tricky art of linguistic code-switching," 14 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'animosity.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of animosity

1568, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for animosity

Middle English animosite, from Middle French or Late Latin; Middle French animosité, from Late Latin animositat-, animositas, from Latin animosus spirited, from animus — see animus

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Statistics for animosity

Last Updated

6 Jan 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for animosity

The first known use of animosity was in 1568

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More Definitions for animosity

animosity

noun
an·​i·​mos·​i·​ty | \ ˌa-nə-ˈmä-sə-tē \
plural animosities

Kids Definition of animosity

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