grandiose

adjective
gran·​di·​ose | \ ˈgran-dē-ˌōs How to pronounce grandiose (audio) , ˌgran-dē-ˈōs \

Definition of grandiose

1 : characterized by affectation of grandeur or splendor or by absurd exaggeration They did not believe his grandiose claims.
2 : impressive because of uncommon largeness, scope, effect, or grandeur had grandiose plans for the city

Keep scrolling for more

Other Words from grandiose

grandiosely adverb
grandioseness noun
grandiosity \ ˌgran-​dē-​ˈä-​sə-​tē How to pronounce grandiosity (audio) \ noun

Choose the Right Synonym for grandiose

grand, magnificent, imposing, stately, majestic, grandiose mean large and impressive. grand adds to greatness of size the implications of handsomeness and dignity. a grand staircase magnificent implies an impressive largeness proportionate to scale without sacrifice of dignity or good taste. magnificent paintings imposing implies great size and dignity but especially stresses impressiveness. an imposing edifice stately may suggest poised dignity, erectness of bearing, handsomeness of proportions, ceremonious deliberation of movement. the stately procession majestic combines the implications of imposing and stately and usually adds a suggestion of solemn grandeur. a majestic waterfall grandiose implies a size or scope exceeding ordinary experience grandiose hydroelectric projects but is most commonly applied derogatorily to inflated pretension or absurd exaggeration. grandiose schemes

Examples of grandiose in a Sentence

He was full of grandiose ideas. a grandiose plan to upgrade the entire interstate highway system in 10 years
Recent Examples on the Web For Vicente, a filmmaker with grandiose ideas about changing the world, the promise of professional success hooked him. Sophie Gilbert, The Atlantic, "How to Tell the Story of a Cult," 8 Nov. 2020 But Scott and editor-in-chief Clare Conley hatched a grandiose plan right there in New York City—many miles away from any sort of tillable ground—that would forever change the path of whitetail deer hunting. Gerry Bethge, Outdoor Life, "The Origin Story of Food Plots for Deer Hunting," 5 Nov. 2020 By all accounts, Jacob was an enchanting talker who could not deliver on any of his grandiose promises. Becca Rothfeld, The New Republic, "The Fiercely Despairing Fiction of Susan Taubes," 16 Oct. 2020 One is more invisible with their trauma and the other is more openly self-important and grandiose with it. Marcus Jones, EW.com, "Jena Malone on taking the villain role is Antebellum: 'I don't really scare easily'," 19 Sep. 2020 Shots punctuated the air and witnesses screamed as police stationed at the grandiose doors to the church appeared to fire at the attacker inside, according to videos obtained by The Associated Press. Arkansas Online, "France goes on maximum alert after attack at church kills 3," 29 Oct. 2020 But that didn’t stop King Charles II of England from issuing, in 1670, a grandiose charter granting an exclusive trading monopoly across the entire Hudson Bay watershed. Charlotte Gray, WSJ, "‘The Company’ Review: Conquering Canada," 27 Oct. 2020 Data show their grandiose plans do not boost a company’s performance. Lila Maclellan, Quartz at Work, "How a narcissistic leader infects company culture," 21 Oct. 2020 Small-time Swahili traders started to see possibilities for more grandiose trade operations. National Geographic, "This abandoned East African city once controlled the medieval gold trade," 3 Sep. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'grandiose.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of grandiose

1818, in the meaning defined at sense 2

History and Etymology for grandiose

French, from Italian grandioso, from grande great, from Latin grandis

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More about grandiose

Time Traveler for grandiose

Time Traveler

The first known use of grandiose was in 1818

See more words from the same year

Listen to Our Podcast about grandiose

Statistics for grandiose

Last Updated

15 Nov 2020

Cite this Entry

“Grandiose.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/grandiose. Accessed 23 Nov. 2020.

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for grandiose

grandiose

adjective
How to pronounce grandiose (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of grandiose

disapproving : seeming to be impressive or intended to be impressive but not really possible or practical

grandiose

adjective
gran·​di·​ose | \ ˈgran-dē-ˌōs How to pronounce grandiose (audio) \

Kids Definition of grandiose

: overly grand or exaggerated He would … fire his warriors with grandiose schemes and wild ideas.— Brian Jacques, Redwall

grandiose

adjective
gran·​di·​ose | \ ˈgran-dē-ˌōs How to pronounce grandiose (audio) , ˌgran-dē-ˈ How to pronounce grandiose (audio) \

Medical Definition of grandiose

: characterized by affectation of grandeur or splendor or by absurd exaggeration a paranoid patient with grandiose delusions

Other Words from grandiose

grandiosely adverb
grandiosity \ ˌgran-​dē-​ˈäs-​ət-​ē How to pronounce grandiosity (audio) \ noun, plural grandiosities

Keep scrolling for more

Comments on grandiose

What made you want to look up grandiose? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

Test Your Vocabulary

Great Scrabble Words—A Quiz

  • scrabble tiles that read scrabble quiz
  • Which of the following Q-without-U words means the number five in cards or dice?
Spell It

Can you spell these 10 commonly misspelled words?

TAKE THE QUIZ
Add Diction

Test Your Knowledge - and learn some interesting things along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!