adjudicate

verb
ad·​ju·​di·​cate | \ ə-ˈjü-di-ˌkāt How to pronounce adjudicate (audio) \
adjudicated; adjudicating

Definition of adjudicate

transitive verb

: to make an official decision about who is right in (a dispute) : to settle judicially The school board will adjudicate claims made against teachers.

intransitive verb

: to act as judge The court can adjudicate on this dispute.

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Other Words from adjudicate

adjudicative \ ə-​ˈjü-​di-​ˌkā-​tiv How to pronounce adjudicate (audio) , -​kə-​ \ adjective
adjudicator \ ə-​ˈjü-​di-​ˌkā-​tər How to pronounce adjudicate (audio) \ noun
adjudicatory \ ə-​ˈjü-​di-​kə-​ˌtȯr-​ē How to pronounce adjudicate (audio) \ adjective

Did You Know?

Adjudicate is one of several terms that give testimony to the influence of jus, the Latin word for "law," on our legal language. Adjudicate is from the Latin verb adjudicare, from judicare, meaning "to judge," which, in turn, traces to the Latin noun judex, meaning "judge." English has other judex words, such as judgment, judicial, judiciary, and prejudice. If we admit further evidence, we discover that the root of judex is jus, the word for "law." What's the verdict? Latin law words frequently preside in English-speaking courtrooms. In addition to the judex words, jury, justice, injury, and perjury are all ultimately from Latin jus.

Examples of adjudicate in a Sentence

The board will adjudicate claims made against teachers. The case was adjudicated in the state courts. The board will adjudicate when claims are made against teachers.
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Recent Examples on the Web There is some pushback at the effort to adjudicate abuses from past centuries. Valentina Pop, WSJ, "The Long, Brutal History of Witch Hunts," 4 Mar. 2021 The House clearly has the authority to adjudicate this dispute. William A. Galston, WSJ, "A Cease-Fire in the Election 2020 Wars," 23 Mar. 2021 The department aimed to process 5,000 applications a week, the documents show — a standard that required agency employees to adjudicate claims that could stretch to hundreds of pages in less than 12 minutes. Stacy Cowley, New York Times, "A DeVos System Allowed 12 Minutes to Decide Student Loan Forgiveness," 19 Mar. 2021 The audit recommends that the department develop a timeline to adjudicate backlogged cases, a communications process for unemployment insurance staffers, and a methodology for recording overpayments. Robert Davis, Washington Examiner, "State audit finds significant problems with Colorado's unemployment insurance claims," 18 Mar. 2021 That process appears to bypass the Maryland State Board of Contract Appeals, which typically must adjudicate bid disputes before protesters may pursue a court case — a process that Tolchin said can add months. Washington Post, "Losing bidder protests Maryland selection for Beltway, I-270 toll lanes developer," 4 Mar. 2021 Proceeds from the sale will enter his estate, which has formed a compensation fund to adjudicate claims from Epstein’s alleged victims. Kaelan Deese, Washington Examiner, "Closing deal could sell Jeffrey Epstein's Manhattan mansion for nearly $50M," 3 Mar. 2021 The proceeds of the sale are slated to go to his estate, which has created a compensation fund to adjudicate claims from Mr. Epstein’s alleged victims. Katherine Clarke, WSJ, "Jeffrey Epstein’s New York Townhouse to Sell for Roughly $50 Million," 3 Mar. 2021 Newspapers and magazines could not resist such a rivalry, nor could intellectuals obliged to adjudicate the dispute. Brandon M. Terry, The New York Review of Books, "What Dignity Demands," 23 Feb. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'adjudicate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of adjudicate

circa 1695, in the meaning defined at transitive sense

History and Etymology for adjudicate

borrowed from Latin adjūdicātus, past participle of adjūdicāre "to adjudge"

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Time Traveler for adjudicate

Time Traveler

The first known use of adjudicate was circa 1695

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Last Updated

16 Apr 2021

Cite this Entry

“Adjudicate.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/adjudicate. Accessed 17 Apr. 2021.

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More Definitions for adjudicate

adjudicate

verb
ad·​ju·​di·​cate | \ ə-ˈjü-di-ˌkāt How to pronounce adjudicate (audio) \
adjudicated; adjudicating

Legal Definition of adjudicate

transitive verb

1 : to settle either finally or temporarily (the rights and duties of the parties to a judicial or quasi-judicial proceeding) on the merits of the issues raised
2 : to pass judgment on as a judge : settle judicially
3 : to pronounce judicially to be was adjudicated a bankrupt was adjudicated the child's father
4 : to convey by judicial sale

intransitive verb

: to come to a judicial decision : act as judge the court adjudicated upon the case

Other Words from adjudicate

adjudication \ ə-​ˌjü-​di-​ˈkā-​shən How to pronounce adjudicate (audio) \ noun
adjudicative \ ə-​ˈjü-​di-​ˌkā-​tiv, -​kə-​ \ noun
adjudicator \ -​ˌkā-​tər How to pronounce adjudicate (audio) \ noun

History and Etymology for adjudicate

Latin adjudicare to award in judgment, from ad to, for + judicare to judge — see judge

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