adjudicate

verb
ad·​ju·​di·​cate | \ ə-ˈjü-di-ˌkāt How to pronounce adjudicate (audio) \
adjudicated; adjudicating

Definition of adjudicate

transitive verb

: to make an official decision about who is right in (a dispute) : to settle judicially The school board will adjudicate claims made against teachers.

intransitive verb

: to act as judge The court can adjudicate on this dispute.

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Other Words from adjudicate

adjudicative \ ə-​ˈjü-​di-​ˌkā-​tiv How to pronounce adjudicative (audio) , -​kə-​ \ adjective
adjudicator \ ə-​ˈjü-​di-​ˌkā-​tər How to pronounce adjudicator (audio) \ noun
adjudicatory \ ə-​ˈjü-​di-​kə-​ˌtȯr-​ē How to pronounce adjudicatory (audio) \ adjective

Did You Know?

Adjudicate is one of several terms that give testimony to the influence of jus, the Latin word for "law," on our legal language. Adjudicate is from the Latin verb adjudicare, from judicare, meaning "to judge," which, in turn, traces to the Latin noun judex, meaning "judge." English has other judex words, such as judgment, judicial,judiciary, and prejudice. If we admit further evidence, we discover that the root of judex is jus, the word for "law." What's the verdict? Latin law words frequently preside in English-speaking courtrooms. In addition to the judex words, jury, justice,injury, and perjury are all ultimately from Latin jus.

Examples of adjudicate in a Sentence

The board will adjudicate claims made against teachers. The case was adjudicated in the state courts. The board will adjudicate when claims are made against teachers.
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Recent Examples on the Web Between June 27 and July 4, the department was able to adjudicate 1,110 cases according to numbers from releases and has 548 staff members working on adjudication. Laura Schulte, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "Republican Assembly members propose forgivable loan program to help those waiting on unemployment," 8 July 2020 The move comes just over two years after Mitchell's records were expunged following an investigation by Twin Galaxies International Scoreboard, which partners with Guinness to adjudicate video game records. Kyle Orland, Ars Technica, "Guinness reinstates Billy Mitchell’s Donkey Kong, Pac-Man records [Updated]," 18 June 2020 The World Trade Organization helps its 164 members adjudicate disputes over subsidies such as the decades-long cases involving U.S. and EU aircraft subsidies. Aoife White, Bloomberg.com, "Why It Seems Like Everybody’s Getting a State Bailout," 5 June 2020 But the stakes are too high to let the matter fester — or leave it to be investigated by and adjudicated in the media. Anthony Leonardi, Washington Examiner, "DNC blasts 'absurd suggestion' from New York Times to investigate Biden sexual assault allegation," 2 May 2020 Who could ever calculate that sum, adjudicate where blame belongs? Deborah Treisman, The New Yorker, "Tessa Hadley on What Happened and What Happened Next," 6 Apr. 2020 Carr, who is now an adult, was adjudicated delinquent by a Family Court judge and sentenced to six months in a juvenile facility in 2017. Washington Post, "Court says insurance doesn’t cover attacker in school fight," 30 Jan. 2020 No academic, journalist, victim or ordinary Catholic has any real idea how the Catholic Church has adjudicated these cases in any systematic way. Nicole Winfield, Anchorage Daily News, "Vatican office struggles to keep up with rise in clergy abuse cases," 21 Dec. 2019 There, personnel walled off from the initial investigation will be tasked with adjudicating the findings and assessing damages, if any, for victims. Kevin Rector, baltimoresun.com, "Kushner apartment company says Maryland AG ‘overreached’ with charges to target a ‘political enemy’," 5 Dec. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'adjudicate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of adjudicate

circa 1695, in the meaning defined at transitive sense

History and Etymology for adjudicate

borrowed from Latin adjūdicātus, past participle of adjūdicāre "to adjudge"

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Time Traveler for adjudicate

Time Traveler

The first known use of adjudicate was circa 1695

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Statistics for adjudicate

Last Updated

20 Jul 2020

Cite this Entry

“Adjudicate.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/adjudicate. Accessed 11 Aug. 2020.

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More Definitions for adjudicate

adjudicate

verb
ad·​ju·​di·​cate | \ ə-ˈjü-di-ˌkāt How to pronounce adjudicate (audio) \
adjudicated; adjudicating

Legal Definition of adjudicate

transitive verb

1 : to settle either finally or temporarily (the rights and duties of the parties to a judicial or quasi-judicial proceeding) on the merits of the issues raised
2 : to pass judgment on as a judge : settle judicially
3 : to pronounce judicially to be was adjudicated a bankrupt was adjudicated the child's father
4 : to convey by judicial sale

intransitive verb

: to come to a judicial decision : act as judge the court adjudicated upon the case

Other Words from adjudicate

adjudication \ ə-​ˌjü-​di-​ˈkā-​shən How to pronounce adjudication (audio) \ noun
adjudicative \ ə-​ˈjü-​di-​ˌkā-​tiv, -​kə-​ \ noun
adjudicator \ -​ˌkā-​tər How to pronounce adjudicator (audio) \ noun

History and Etymology for adjudicate

Latin adjudicare to award in judgment, from ad to, for + judicare to judge — see judge

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