adjudication

noun

ad·​ju·​di·​ca·​tion ə-ˌjü-di-ˈkā-shən How to pronounce adjudication (audio)
1
: the act or process of adjudicating a dispute
The case is under adjudication.
2
a
: a judicial decision or sentence
b
: a decree in bankruptcy

Examples of adjudication in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web The ultimate standard of asylum, the merits stage — that standard is higher, and the difficulty is that a great number qualify under that lower standard and have historically, and far fewer qualify ultimately, but the time in between those moments of adjudication is years. Lulu Garcia-Navarro, New York Times, 2 Feb. 2024 The two companies have recently dropped out of the lawsuit, but other corporate entities that lease land to the growers remain in the water adjudication case as plaintiffs. Ian James, Los Angeles Times, 13 Nov. 2023 Moreover, the White House would be willing to mandate the detention of certain migrants who are allowed into the country pending the adjudication of their claims. Camilo Montoya-Galvez, CBS News, 12 Dec. 2023 And to the point about getting rid of him prior to a conviction or an adjudication in court, there is an argument that voters in the district did not have a lot of information about George Santos. ABC News, 3 Dec. 2023 Supreme Court justices appeared skeptical of the Securities and Exchange Commission's powers to conduct in-house adjudications without juries in a case that could disrupt the administrative state. Kaelan Deese, Washington Examiner, 29 Nov. 2023 If somebody has a mental involuntary commitment and adjudication of that nature, that usually would go into the system, and that would be on a traditional background check. Bridget Bowman, NBC News, 30 Oct. 2023 Holly pleaded no contest, according to court records, and a judge withheld adjudication again. Katie Mettler, Washington Post, 25 Oct. 2023 Once the investigation and adjudication process is complete, Athletics will reassess the status of the teams. Chris Barilla, Peoplemag, 22 Sep. 2023 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'adjudication.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

borrowed from Latin adjūdicātiōn-, adjūdicātiō "act of assignment (by a judge)," from adjūdicāre "to adjudge" + -tiōn-, -tiō, suffix of action nouns

First Known Use

1680, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of adjudication was in 1680

Dictionary Entries Near adjudication

Cite this Entry

“Adjudication.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/adjudication. Accessed 26 Feb. 2024.

Last Updated: - Updated example sentences
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