accredit

verb
ac·​cred·​it | \ ə-ˈkre-dət How to pronounce accredit (audio) \
accredited; accrediting; accredits

Definition of accredit

transitive verb

1 : to give official authorization to or approval of:
a : to provide with credentials especially : to send (an envoy) with letters of authorization accredit an ambassador to France
b : to recognize or vouch for as conforming with a standard The program was accredited by the American Dental Association.
c : to recognize (an educational institution) as maintaining standards that qualify the graduates for admission to higher or more specialized institutions or for professional practice
2 : to consider or recognize as outstanding an accredited scientist
3 : attribute, credit an invention accredited to the company's founder

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Other Words from accredit

accreditable \ -​də-​tə-​bəl How to pronounce accreditable (audio) \ adjective
accreditation \ ə-​ˌkre-​də-​ˈtā-​shən How to pronounce accreditation (audio) , -​ˈdā-​ \ noun

Choose the Right Synonym for accredit

approve, endorse, sanction, accredit, certify mean to have or express a favorable opinion of. approve often implies no more than this but may suggest considerable esteem or admiration. the parents approve of the marriage endorse suggests an explicit statement of support. publicly endorsed her for Senator sanction implies both approval and authorization. the President sanctioned covert operations accredit and certify usually imply official endorsement attesting to conformity to set standards. the board voted to accredit the college must be certified to teach

Examples of accredit in a Sentence

The association only accredits programs that meet its high standards. The program was accredited by the American Dental Association. The invention of scuba gear is accredited to Jacques Cousteau. accredit an ambassador to France
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Recent Examples on the Web

More than 39,000 students matriculated from two-year or four-year culinary degree programs accredited by the ACF last year. Katy Mclaughlin, WSJ, "A Reckoning With the Dark Side of the Restaurant Industry," 12 Nov. 2018 The Journal previously reported that the Joint Commission continued to accredit a variety of hospitals despite safety violations. Stephanie Armour, WSJ, "Psychiatric Hospitals With Safety Violations Still Get Accreditation," 26 Dec. 2018 Among the groups affected could be the Joint Commission, the nation’s largest hospital and health organization accrediting organization. Stephanie Armour, WSJ, "U.S. Weighs Potential Conflicts in Hospital-Accreditation Groups With Consulting Arms," 18 Dec. 2018 Once the school is accredited, students can qualify for Pell grants and other federal student assistance to help cover tuition, which is expected to cost $12,000 a year. Alexia Elejalde-ruiz, chicagotribune.com, "JP Morgan Chase helps fund new community college targeting Chicago's Latino community," 28 June 2018 Any schools that were participating in the scholarship program before June 9, 2015 and are not accredited must gain accreditation before June 9 of this year or they will be dropped from the participating list, according to the law. Trisha Powell Crain, AL.com, "$30 million in AAA tax credits already claimed for 2018," 27 Apr. 2018 Through the start of June, accrediting body Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business advertised 28 job listings for business-school deans in 2018, up nearly 50% from this time last year. Kelsey Gee, WSJ, "Columbia Business School Dean to Step Down," 13 Sep. 2018 Journalists and other people accredited by the court will follow proceedings from a giant television screen on the court premises, but they are not permitted to carry mobile phones or laptops, preventing them from filing during the case. Farai Mutsaka, Fox News, "Zimbabwe court to hear opposition party's election challenge," 22 Aug. 2018 In others, anyone can perform nutrition counseling but only registered dietitians are accredited by the government as providers whose services are eligible for insurance reimbursement. Denby Royal, SELF, "I Used to Be a Wellness Influencer. Now I'm an Alternative Medicine Skeptic," 9 Aug. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'accredit.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of accredit

1535, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for accredit

probably borrowed from Latin accrēditus, past participle of accrēdere "to give credence to, believe, put faith in," from ad- ad- + crēdere "to entrust, believe" — more at creed

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Statistics for accredit

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Time Traveler for accredit

The first known use of accredit was in 1535

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More Definitions for accredit

accredit

verb

English Language Learners Definition of accredit

: to say that something is good enough to be given official approval
: to give (someone) credit for something
: to send (someone, such as an ambassador) to act as an official representative

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More from Merriam-Webster on accredit

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for accredit

Spanish Central: Translation of accredit

Nglish: Translation of accredit for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of accredit for Arabic Speakers

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