adjudicate

verb
ad·​ju·​di·​cate | \ ə-ˈjü-di-ˌkāt How to pronounce adjudicate (audio) \
adjudicated; adjudicating

Definition of adjudicate

transitive verb

: to make an official decision about who is right in (a dispute) : to settle judicially The school board will adjudicate claims made against teachers.

intransitive verb

: to act as judge The court can adjudicate on this dispute.

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Other Words from adjudicate

adjudicative \ ə-​ˈjü-​di-​ˌkā-​tiv How to pronounce adjudicative (audio) , -​kə-​ \ adjective
adjudicator \ ə-​ˈjü-​di-​ˌkā-​tər How to pronounce adjudicator (audio) \ noun
adjudicatory \ ə-​ˈjü-​di-​kə-​ˌtȯr-​ē How to pronounce adjudicatory (audio) \ adjective

Did You Know?

Adjudicate is one of several terms that give testimony to the influence of jus, the Latin word for "law," on our legal language. Adjudicate is from the Latin verb adjudicare, from judicare, meaning "to judge," which, in turn, traces to the Latin noun judex, meaning "judge." English has other judex words, such as judgment, judicial,judiciary, and prejudice. If we admit further evidence, we discover that the root of judex is jus, the word for "law." What's the verdict? Latin law words frequently preside in English-speaking courtrooms. In addition to the judex words, jury, justice,injury, and perjury are all ultimately from Latin jus.

Examples of adjudicate in a Sentence

The board will adjudicate claims made against teachers. The case was adjudicated in the state courts. The board will adjudicate when claims are made against teachers.
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Recent Examples on the Web The investigation surrounding that thread cost Twin Galaxies months of time and thousands of dollars in equipment and salaries to adjudicate, according to court documents. Kyle Orland, Ars Technica, "Billy Mitchell takes his Donkey Kong high-score cheating case to court," 4 May 2020 The question of who gets a ventilator and who does not, when two people are both in real need, is a question of justice of the sort doctors are not trained to adjudicate. James Hamblin, The Atlantic, "An Ethicist on How to Make Impossible Decisions," 1 Apr. 2020 The Supreme Court in 1970 ruled that state and federal governments can not deprive anyone of public benefits without giving them the opportunity to adjudicate their case at a fair hearing. Akilah Johnson, ProPublica, "Medicaid Abruptly Canceled Her Health Insurance. Then Came the Coronavirus.," 25 Mar. 2020 The opposition tickets, disputing roughly 15 percent of the total vote count, appealed to the Independent Electoral Complaints Commission, which adjudicates candidate objections before a final result is announced. Mujib Mashal, New York Times, "Afghan Votes Will Be Audited, Extending Monthslong Election Crisis," 5 Feb. 2020 The woman received the settlement, according to The Washington Times, and did not pursue a formal complaint with the Office of Compliance, which adjudicates workplace complaints. Yvonne Wingett Sanchez, azcentral, "Rep. Raul Grijalva under scrutiny by House ethics committee over workplace allegations," 14 June 2019 In addition to more beds, the ICE budget asked for greater funding to adjudicate asylum claims and hire attorneys to work on behalf of the government in appeals cases. Fox News, "ICE chief: It will take 140 years to clear 'backlog' of illegal immigrants after US-Mexico border surge," 12 Mar. 2020 With her example, an entire generation of women has risen up in the courts, teaching law, practicing it, deciding it, adjudicating it—all the while working toward that more perfect union. Mattie Kahn, Glamour, "‘Thank You, RBG’: 9 Women Who Clerked for the Supreme Court Justice on Her Enduring Example," 6 Mar. 2020 Judge Stein said the plaintiffs’ circumstances and their decisions to buy and sell were so dissimilar that their claims needed to be adjudicated case-by-case. Andrew Scurria, WSJ, "UBS Investors Dealt Setback Over Puerto Rico Fund Losses," 18 Sep. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'adjudicate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of adjudicate

circa 1695, in the meaning defined at transitive sense

History and Etymology for adjudicate

borrowed from Latin adjūdicātus, past participle of adjūdicāre "to adjudge"

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Time Traveler for adjudicate

Time Traveler

The first known use of adjudicate was circa 1695

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Statistics for adjudicate

Last Updated

19 May 2020

Cite this Entry

“Adjudicate.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/adjudicate. Accessed 1 Jun. 2020.

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More Definitions for adjudicate

adjudicate

verb
ad·​ju·​di·​cate | \ ə-ˈjü-di-ˌkāt How to pronounce adjudicate (audio) \
adjudicated; adjudicating

Legal Definition of adjudicate

transitive verb

1 : to settle either finally or temporarily (the rights and duties of the parties to a judicial or quasi-judicial proceeding) on the merits of the issues raised
2 : to pass judgment on as a judge : settle judicially
3 : to pronounce judicially to be was adjudicated a bankrupt was adjudicated the child's father
4 : to convey by judicial sale

intransitive verb

: to come to a judicial decision : act as judge the court adjudicated upon the case

Other Words from adjudicate

adjudication \ ə-​ˌjü-​di-​ˈkā-​shən How to pronounce adjudication (audio) \ noun
adjudicative \ ə-​ˈjü-​di-​ˌkā-​tiv, -​kə-​ \ noun
adjudicator \ -​ˌkā-​tər How to pronounce adjudicator (audio) \ noun

History and Etymology for adjudicate

Latin adjudicare to award in judgment, from ad to, for + judicare to judge — see judge

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