adjudicate

verb
ad·​ju·​di·​cate | \ ə-ˈjü-di-ˌkāt How to pronounce adjudicate (audio) \
adjudicated; adjudicating

Definition of adjudicate

transitive verb

: to make an official decision about who is right in (a dispute) : to settle judicially The school board will adjudicate claims made against teachers.

intransitive verb

: to act as judge The court can adjudicate on this dispute.

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Other Words from adjudicate

adjudicative \ -​ˌkā-​tiv How to pronounce adjudicative (audio) , -​kə-​ \ adjective
adjudicator \ -​ˌkā-​tər How to pronounce adjudicator (audio) \ noun
adjudicatory \ -​ˈjü-​di-​kə-​ˌtȯr-​ē How to pronounce adjudicatory (audio) \ adjective

Did You Know?

Adjudicate is one of several terms that give testimony to the influence of jus, the Latin word for "law," on our legal language. Adjudicate is from the Latin verb adjudicare, from judicare, meaning "to judge," which, in turn, traces to the Latin noun judex, meaning "judge." English has other judex words, such as judgment, judicial, judiciary, and prejudice. If we admit further evidence, we discover that the root of judex is jus, the word for "law." What's the verdict? Latin law words frequently preside in English-speaking courtrooms. In addition to the judex words, jury, justice, injury, and perjury are all ultimately from Latin jus.

Examples of adjudicate in a Sentence

The board will adjudicate claims made against teachers. The case was adjudicated in the state courts. The board will adjudicate when claims are made against teachers.
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Recent Examples on the Web

Some parents who don’t pass will be allowed to remain with their children in the US while the children’s cases are adjudicated. Dara Lind, Vox, "As many as 1,000 parents separated from their children are getting a second chance to stay in the US," 13 Sep. 2018 On Monday, a federal judge blocked a policy that would require asylum seekers to languish in Mexico while their cases were adjudicated in the States. Lynn Yaeger, Vogue, "The Week in Washington: An Outrageous Abuse of Power," 14 Apr. 2019 Skeen has continued to work for the Kansas City Fire Department as the case was adjudicated. William Cummings, USA TODAY, "Kansas City firefighter found not guilty of spitting on black child, using racial slur," 10 May 2018 Manafort declined to waive his right to have the charges adjudicated in Virginia. Washington Post, "Judge poses pointed questions on Manafort charges at hearing," 4 May 2018 Ideal government, of which the Constitution is a more or less perfect expression, derives from the need to adjudicate between two parties claiming, using, or defending their rights or property when one or more isn’t acting in good faith. James Pogue, Outside Online, "The Religious Ideology Driving the Bundy Brothers," 14 May 2018 More resources are needed to adjudicate asylum claims more rapidly, to secure people with pending claims in sustainable and humane ways, and to assist Central American countries in combating the underlying issues that drive people north. Matthew Yglesias, Vox, "The shutdown is intractable because Trump’s wall is ridiculous and Republicans know it," 8 Jan. 2019 Firearm ownership is prohibited for a person who is involuntarily committed to a mental-health facility or who has been adjudicated incompetent to manage his or her affairs, Prince said. Erin Mccarthy, Philly.com, "Before walking Abington streets with AR-15, man searched the internet, asking 'What weapons were used in Columbine'," 4 May 2018 Federal law already bars people who have been adjudicated mentally ill or committed to institutions from buying firearms. Richard A. Oppel Jr., New York Times, "In Florida, Extraordinary Obstacles for Changes to Gun Laws," 17 Feb. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'adjudicate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of adjudicate

circa 1695, in the meaning defined at transitive sense

History and Etymology for adjudicate

borrowed from Latin adjūdicātus, past participle of adjūdicāre "to adjudge"

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Statistics for adjudicate

Last Updated

17 Jun 2019

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Time Traveler for adjudicate

The first known use of adjudicate was circa 1695

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More Definitions for adjudicate

adjudicate

verb
ad·​ju·​di·​cate | \ ə-ˈjü-di-ˌkāt How to pronounce adjudicate (audio) \
adjudicated; adjudicating

Legal Definition of adjudicate

transitive verb

1 : to settle either finally or temporarily (the rights and duties of the parties to a judicial or quasi-judicial proceeding) on the merits of the issues raised
2 : to pass judgment on as a judge : settle judicially
3 : to pronounce judicially to be was adjudicated a bankrupt was adjudicated the child's father
4 : to convey by judicial sale

intransitive verb

: to come to a judicial decision : act as judge the court adjudicated upon the case

Other Words from adjudicate

adjudication \ ə-​ˌjü-​di-​ˈkā-​shən How to pronounce adjudication (audio) \ noun
adjudicative \ ə-​ˈjü-​di-​ˌkā-​tiv, -​kə-​ \ noun
adjudicator \ -​ˌkā-​tər How to pronounce adjudicator (audio) \ noun

History and Etymology for adjudicate

Latin adjudicare to award in judgment, from ad to, for + judicare to judge — see judge

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