breath

noun
\ ˈbreth \

Definition of breath

1a : air filled with a fragrance or odor
b : a slight indication : suggestion the faintest breath of scandal
2a : the faculty of breathing recovering his breath after the race
b : an act of breathing fought to the last breath
c : opportunity or time to breathe : respite
3 : a slight breeze
4a : air inhaled and exhaled in breathing bad breath
b : something (such as moisture on a cold surface) produced by breath or breathing
5 : a spoken sound : utterance
breath of fresh air
: a welcome or refreshing change
in one breath or in the same breath
: almost simultaneously
out of breath
: breathing very rapidly (as from strenuous exercise)
under one's breath
: so as to be barely audible mumbled something under his breath

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Examples of breath in a Sentence

When Oscar Wilde allegedly gestured at the garish wallpaper in his cheap Parisian hotel room and announced with his dying breath, "Either it goes or I go," he was exhibiting something beyond an irrepressibly brilliant wit. — Tom Robbins, Harper's, September 2004 I ski as far as I can and stop (in these relatively low-altitude coastal mountains, you don't stop for breath the way you sometimes do in Colorado; here you stop when your legs demand a break) … — Lito Tejada-Flores, Skiing, February 1999 gum that freshens your breath It's so cold outside that I can see my breath. My mad dash for the bus left me gasping for breath. I took a long breath before speaking again.
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Recent Examples on the Web

What unfolded, however, was one of those rare, magical fashion moments that takes the whole room's breath away. Lauren Alexis Fisher, Harper's BAZAAR, "This New Japanese Designer Just Put the Magic Back in New York Fashion Week," 9 Feb. 2019 That's because pilots reported episodes of oxygen deficiency, including shortness of breath and disorientation. Fox News, "Vice president's son completes Navy training in Mississippi," 28 Sep. 2018 Taking in every breath, every sight, and sound and holding it dearly. Taylor Mead, House Beautiful, "Joanna Gaines’s New Year’s Resolution Is Something Everyone Should Adopt This Year," 3 Jan. 2019 Tired Spongebob Nothing sums up our end-of-year exhaustion better like an out-of-breath Spongebob Squarepants. Erica Gonzales, Harper's BAZAAR, "22 Memes That Made 2018 Less Horrible," 17 Dec. 2018 Take deep belly breaths and let the residual tension go with every exhale. Zoë Ligon, Allure, "9 Things You Need to Know Before You Have Anal," 5 Nov. 2018 Officers found the Minnesota native alert and conscious, but highly intoxicated with a strong smell of alcohol in her breath, police said. Katherine Lam, Fox News, "'One of the worst DUI offenders in the US' arrested with liquor bottle in passenger seat: cops," 2 Oct. 2018 Recent research shared in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, however, found that breath monitors (typically $200 to $300) provide the most accurate readings. Karla Walsh, Woman's Day, "What Is the Keto Diet, Exactly?," 27 Dec. 2018 Or people in the Central Valley, where there aren’t great multimodal transportation options, and most of the growth tends to be low-density sprawl development that relies on cars to get around? AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli Deep breath. Alissa Walker, Curbed, "Getting around the Bay Area with Chanell Fletcher," 21 Dec. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'breath.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of breath

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for breath

Middle English breth, from Old English brǣth; akin to Old High German brādam breath, and perhaps to Old English beorma yeast — more at barm

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Statistics for breath

Last Updated

16 Feb 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for breath

The first known use of breath was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for breath

breath

noun

English Language Learners Definition of breath

: the air that you take into your lungs and send out from your lungs when you breathe : air that is inhaled and exhaled in breathing
: the ability to breathe freely
: an amount of air that you take into your lungs

breath

noun
\ ˈbreth \

Kids Definition of breath

1 : ability to breathe : ease of breathing I lost my breath for a moment.
2 : air taken in or sent out by the lungs Hold your breath. It's so cold I can see my breath.
3 : a slight breeze a breath of wind
out of breath
: breathing very rapidly as a result of hard exercise
under someone's breath
: very quietly “Don't blow this for me,” Dad said under his breath.— Jack Gantos, Joey Pigza Loses Control

breath

noun
\ ˈbreth \

Medical Definition of breath

1a : the faculty of breathing recovering her breath after the race
b : an act or an instance of breathing or inhaling
2a : air inhaled and exhaled in breathing bad breath
b : something (as moisture on a cold surface) produced by breath or breathing
out of breath
: breathing very rapidly (as from strenuous exercise)

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More from Merriam-Webster on breath

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for breath

Spanish Central: Translation of breath

Nglish: Translation of breath for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of breath for Arabic Speakers

Comments on breath

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