lull

1 of 2

verb

lulled; lulling; lulls

transitive verb

1
: to cause to sleep or rest : soothe
He was lulled to sleep by her soothing voice.
2
: to cause to relax vigilance
were lulled into a false sense of security

lull

2 of 2

noun

1
: a temporary pause or decline in activity
the early-morning lull in urban noise
: such as
a
: a temporary drop in business activity
b
: a temporary calm before or during a storm
2
archaic : something that lulls
especially : lullaby

Examples of lull in a Sentence

Verb The music lulled him to sleep. the absence of attacks for such an extended period had lulled the nation into a false sense of security Noun we took the opportunity of a lull in the conversation to announce that we were engaged to be married
Recent Examples on the Web
Verb
Thirdly, a user is gradually and silently lulled into believing that the generative AI is flawless. Lance Eliot, Forbes, 16 Feb. 2024 As the child drifts off to sleep, little ones listening along will be lulled into quiet time, too. Wendy Dunn, Fort Worth Star-Telegram, 31 Jan. 2024 Almost constant sunny weather has lulled us Californians into complacency. Debbie Arrington, Sacramento Bee, 31 Jan. 2024 Train travel is a distinct way to see the world as you’re lulled into relaxation by the calming chug of the engine and lovely landscapes whizzing by. Tracy Scott Forson, Smithsonian Magazine, 5 Jan. 2024 Knowing they are relaxed is often enough to lull her to sleep. Hiba Yazbek, New York Times, 24 Dec. 2023 The Wingfield family’s repressions are bound to boil over, but they are lulled into stasis by Williams’ poetical eloquence. David L. Coddon, San Diego Union-Tribune, 11 Dec. 2023 This portable white noise machine will block out any loud hotel or Airbnb neighbors, perfect for sensitive sleepers or lulling jet-setting babies to sleep. Amanda Finnegan, Washington Post, 4 Dec. 2023 This multi-sensory method lulls the brain into relaxation, and then finally sleep creeps in. Hannah Coates, Vogue, 31 Dec. 2023
Noun
In the early 18th century, New Orleanians celebrated Mardi Gras with masked balls and parades, but the Spanish occupation of the city led to a multi-decade lull in the festivities. Elizabeth Djinis, Smithsonian Magazine, 12 Feb. 2024 For a better chance of spotting any of these, or simply to enjoy the lull of being on the water, step onto a boat of your choice. Chelsee Lowe, Travel + Leisure, 5 Feb. 2024 And a spate of new government data released this week shows just how quiet that lull has become. Irina Ivanova, Fortune, 31 Jan. 2024 The time between the end of the primaries and the party conventions usually brings a lull in the campaign, when presumptive nominees test attacks on opponents, shore up their shortcomings and build the policy, political and financing foundation for the fall campaign. Adam Nagourney, New York Times, 28 Jan. 2024 On the flip side, KU lacks depth, shoots 3-pointers at the lowest rate in the Bill Self era and is prone to offensive lulls. Shreyas Laddha, Kansas City Star, 26 Jan. 2024 The last time North Americans caught a total solar eclipse, the sun was in a lull of activity. Meghan Bartels, Scientific American, 18 Jan. 2024 In San Francisco, at The Kimpton Alton, the Leafy Dreams package leans into CBD and cannabis experiences to lull guests into dreamland. Ronny Maye, Essence, 5 Feb. 2024 In the lull, Deborah dealt with health problems, including a heart condition that tires her easily. Jill Wendholt Silva, Kansas City Star, 30 Jan. 2024 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'lull.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Verb and Noun

Middle English; probably of imitative origin

First Known Use

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Noun

1719, in the meaning defined at sense 2

Time Traveler
The first known use of lull was in the 14th century

Dictionary Entries Near lull

Cite this Entry

“Lull.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/lull. Accessed 29 Feb. 2024.

Kids Definition

lull

1 of 2 verb
1
: to cause to sleep or rest
2
: to cause to relax vigilance
were lulled into a false sense of security

lull

2 of 2 noun
1
: a temporary calm before or during a storm
2
: a temporary drop in activity

More from Merriam-Webster on lull

Last Updated: - Updated example sentences
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