Scotch

1 of 7

adjective

1
2
: inclined to frugality

Scotch

2 of 7

noun (1)

1
: scots
2
plural in construction : the people of Scotland
3
often not capitalized : whiskey distilled in Scotland especially from malted barley

called also Scotch whisky

Scotch

3 of 7

trademark

used for adhesive tape

scotch

4 of 7

verb (1)

scotched; scotching; scotches

transitive verb

1
archaic : cut, gash, score
also : wound
we have scotched the snake, not killed it William Shakespeare
2
: to put an end to
scotched rumors of a military takeover

scotch

5 of 7

noun (2)

: a superficial cut : score

scotch

6 of 7

noun (3)

: a chock to prevent rolling or slipping

scotch

7 of 7

verb (2)

scotched; scotching; scotches

transitive verb

1
: to block with a chock
2

Examples of Scotch in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web
Verb
But electric cars at the time cost a lot to build and had limited range, and Mr. Wang had to scotch his plans to enter the American market. Keith Bradsher, New York Times, 12 Feb. 2024 After taking charge in late 2018, Culp quickly scotched plans for an IPO of the entire health care business, and instead decided that only massive debt reduction would enable GE to simplify its business and potentially divide into durable, stand-alone enterprises. Shawn Tully, Fortune, 26 Jan. 2024 Canada’s NorthStar Earth and Space has signed a multi-launch deal with Rocket Lab after Virgin Orbit’s bankruptcy scotched plans to deploy its space situational awareness satellites this summer, Space News reports. Eric Berger, Ars Technica, 23 June 2023 Talk of the couple installing an air conditioner — and thus, like the guy who threw out the induction oven last week, invalidating the carbon-neutral nature of the house — scotches the deal. Alan Sepinwall, Rolling Stone, 8 Dec. 2023 With West Virginia scotched, the Democratic Senate map is undeniably constricting. Shane Goldmacher, New York Times, 10 Nov. 2023 In February, the SEC forced crypto exchange Kraken to scotch a program offering returns as high as 21%. Shawn Tully, Fortune, 8 May 2023 Kavanaugh and company might also block D.C. statehood, hollow out any new voting-rights provisions, and scotch any attempts to reform the electoral process. David Faris, The New Republic, 22 Sep. 2020 Glover also talked about how not getting a shot at Saturday Night Live — pal Amy Poehler reportedly told him his edgy stand-up is what scotched the deal — was probably a good thing. Gil Kaufman, Billboard, 5 Apr. 2023
Noun
The whiskey, bottled at a high 99 proof, is almost like an older scotch, with unusually prominent (for American whiskey) notes of tropical fruit on the palate. Jonah Flicker, Robb Report, 15 May 2024 Born in Philadelphia to a boxing trainer who used to throw empty scotch bottles at him, Feldman has ascended from boxer to small-time MMA promoter to scion of a new combat sport. Stayton Bonner, Rolling Stone, 21 Apr. 2024 In the back is a moody, intimate lounge that mixes drinks such as the Tomb of the Fizzy Kitty (with ingredients like scotch, fernet, black-cherry cola, and lime). Chadner Navarro, Condé Nast Traveler, 8 Apr. 2024 The two have a laugh and Capote hands her a Valium to wash down with scotch. Paula Mejía, The Atlantic, 19 Mar. 2024 Guinness is poured with a perfect creamy head, and there’s a decent selection of scotch and Irish whiskeys. Kate Bradshaw, The Mercury News, 4 Mar. 2024 Breakfast cocktails include Sunday Morning, with rye whiskey, scotch and maple syrup; and Coffee + TV, with vodka, coffee and orange liqueurs, smoked vanilla syrup and espresso. Pam Kragen, San Diego Union-Tribune, 9 Feb. 2024 No cask finishing or other whisky gimmicks were used, just the careful selection and blending of some of the distillery’s best barrels resulting in yet another bottle for scotch fans to hunt down. Jonah Flicker, Robb Report, 4 Feb. 2024 Guests can sit back and explore quality cigars with a glass of whiskey, scotch, wine, spirit or liqueur. Ebony L. Morman, Charlotte Observer, 1 Feb. 2024

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'Scotch.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Adjective

contraction of Scottish

Verb (1)

Middle English scocchen to gash, from Anglo-French escocher, eschocher to pierce

Noun (3)

origin unknown

First Known Use

Adjective

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Noun (1)

1603, in the meaning defined at sense 2

Verb (1)

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Noun (2)

15th century, in the meaning defined above

Noun (3)

1639, in the meaning defined above

Verb (2)

1642, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of Scotch was in the 15th century

Dictionary Entries Near Scotch

Cite this Entry

“Scotch.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/Scotch. Accessed 21 May. 2024.

Kids Definition

scotch

1 of 3 verb
ˈskäch
1
archaic : to injure so as to make temporarily harmless
2
: to stamp out : crush
especially : to put an end to by showing the untruth of
scotch a rumor

Scotch

2 of 3 adjective

Scotch

3 of 3 noun
1
: scots
2
Scotch plural : the people of Scotland
3
often not capitalized : whiskey made in Scotland especially from barley
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