zigzag

noun
zig·​zag | \ ˈzig-ˌzag How to pronounce zigzag (audio) \

Definition of zigzag

 (Entry 1 of 4)

: one of a series of short sharp turns, angles, or alterations in a course also : something having the form or character of such a series a blouse with green zigzags endured the zigzags of policy — Richard Bernstein

zigzag

adverb

Definition of zigzag (Entry 2 of 4)

: in or by a zigzag path or course

zigzag

adjective

Definition of zigzag (Entry 3 of 4)

: having short sharp turns or angles a zigzag trail

zigzag

verb
zigzagged; zigzagging

Definition of zigzag (Entry 4 of 4)

transitive verb

: to form into a zigzag or move along a zigzag course

intransitive verb

: to lie in, proceed along, or consist of a zigzag course

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Other Words from zigzag

Noun

zigzaggy \ ˈzig-​ˌza-​gē How to pronounce zigzaggy (audio) \ adjective

Synonyms for zigzag

Synonyms: Verb

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Examples of zigzag in a Sentence

Noun The kids were running in circles and zigzags around the yard. He's wearing a shirt with red zigzags on it. Verb We saw a motorcycle zigzagging on the highway. The player with the ball zigzagged back and forth down the field. A dirt road zigzags up the steep hill to our cabin.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Casually kicking his skateboard up into his hand after an afternoon run, Zuppke stopped long enough to admire the design of the surface, a two-tone zigzag pattern that reminds Sarah Lemelin of Charlie Brown’s trademark shirt. John Monaghan, Detroit Free Press, "Backyard skate ramp was a labor of love for 3 generations of a Ferndale family," 30 May 2020 Queen Rania of Jordan wore a grey Nafsika Skourti jacket with zigzag embroidery to welcome the president and first lady of Germany to Amman in 2015. Sheila Marikar, 1843, "Arab millennials have a new favourite fashion brand," 7 May 2020 Why not take a zigzag journey through the state capitals? Ted Widmer, Time, "How Lincoln Managed America's Governors to Become a Great National Leader," 17 Apr. 2020 Floating above the rising line were some black zigzags that faintly resembled cursive letters: the president’s signature. Mattathias Schwartz, New York Times, "Trump and His Allies Played Down the Virus. Then the Dow Got Infected.," 27 Mar. 2020 But today, without that costly option, Roscosmos engineers need to fit all major components onto rail cars, which could then pass through the narrow tunnels and treacherous zigzags of the Trans-Siberian railroad. Anatoly Zak, Popular Mechanics, "Everything You Need To Know About Russia’s (Possibly Fictional) Super Heavy Rocket," 3 Feb. 2020 Grazer came to Hollywood by way of a zigzag academic route, majoring in psychology at the University of Southern California, switching to cinema and television, then graduating and spending a year in law school before starting in TV production. Jeffrey Kluger, Time, "Producer Brian Grazer Wants You to Be More Curious About Other People," 19 Sep. 2019 In dramatic terms, 2020 is an exciting race with more zigzags that a slalom. Walter Shapiro, The New Republic, "The Media’s Lousy Election Analysis Is Damaging Political Discourse," 12 Feb. 2020 The pattern is less bothersome when used in flooring because the alternating zigzags are all the same color. Elizabeth Mayhew, Washington Post, "6 decorating trends that need to die," 31 Dec. 2019 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb By contrast, Isle de France is reached by steep zigzagging roads that let out into a green beachside oasis. Kate Holstein, Condé Nast Traveler, "Falling in Love With St. Barts All Over Again," 10 Apr. 2020 Lightfoot’s on the road in Iowa where candidates for months now have been zigzagging the state in hopes of notching an initial victory as primary season gets underway. Lisa Donovan, chicagotribune.com, "The Spin: Who is the unnamed Illinois public official R. Kelly allegedly bribed in newest round of legal woes?," 5 Dec. 2019 Phaethon was on a thrill ride, zigzagging horses and chariot and gradually losing control. Mike Lynch, Twin Cities, "Mike Lynch: A celestial swan song," 6 Oct. 2019 Thompson and his team are usually knee-deep in recruiting trips in March and April, spending their days zigzagging the country to convince kids to become Ducks. oregonlive, "High school seniors face tough college choices, uncertain futures amid coronavirus worries," 1 May 2020 After separating from its carrier in the stratosphere, the HGV zigzagged 6000 kilometers across Siberia at a searing Mach 27, Russian officials claimed, then smashed into a target on the Kamchatka Peninsula. Richard Stone, Science | AAAS, "‘National pride is at stake.’ Russia, China, United States race to build hypersonic weapons," 8 Jan. 2020 Thomas Cook’s cash flows traditionally zigzag from season to season, with money flowing in during the summer months through September and rushing out again in the period through March. Washington Post, "Thomas Cook’s Creditors Have the Right to Feel Outraged," 23 Sep. 2019 In Doctor Who lore, TARDIS is powered by time crystals, those exotic artifacts portrayed elsewhere in science fiction as the ultimate tools for zigzagging across dimensions. Stav Dimitropoulos, Popular Mechanics, "Could These Crystals Help Us Travel Through Time?," 11 Feb. 2020 Throughout the crisis, the actual version has zigzagged between denial and reluctantly accepting the advice of his medical advisers. John Cassidy, The New Yorker, "Trump’s “Light at the End of the Tunnel” Is a Delusion," 7 Apr. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'zigzag.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of zigzag

Noun

1712, in the meaning defined above

Adverb

circa 1730, in the meaning defined above

Adjective

1750, in the meaning defined above

Verb

1777, in the meaning defined at transitive sense

History and Etymology for zigzag

Noun

French

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Time Traveler for zigzag

Time Traveler

The first known use of zigzag was in 1712

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Statistics for zigzag

Cite this Entry

“Zigzag.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/zigzag. Accessed 30 Oct. 2020.

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More Definitions for zigzag

zigzag

noun
How to pronounce zigzag (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of zigzag

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a line that has a series of short, sharp turns or angles

zigzag

verb

English Language Learners Definition of zigzag (Entry 2 of 2)

: to move along a path that has a series of short, sharp turns or angles

zigzag

noun
zig·​zag | \ ˈzig-ˌzag How to pronounce zigzag (audio) \

Kids Definition of zigzag

 (Entry 1 of 4)

1 : one of a series of short sharp turns or angles in a line or course
2 : a line, path, or pattern with a series of short sharp angles

zigzag

adverb

Kids Definition of zigzag (Entry 2 of 4)

: in or by a line or course that has short sharp turns or angles He ran zigzag across the field.

zigzag

adjective

Kids Definition of zigzag (Entry 3 of 4)

: having short sharp turns or angles

zigzag

verb
zigzagged; zigzagging

Kids Definition of zigzag (Entry 4 of 4)

: to form into or move along a line or course that has short sharp turns or angles Both kids took off, zigzagging around trees and bushes.— Blue Balliett, Chasing Vermeer

More from Merriam-Webster on zigzag

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for zigzag

Nglish: Translation of zigzag for Spanish Speakers

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